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My partner and I are fighting about this. I had 10 and something, don't remember and he had 3 and 2. On the table : 10 J Q K A. I think I win with my 10 completing my straight but he said we had to split cause it was straight in the table. Who is right in this case guys? Thank you!

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1 Answer 1

It's a split.

In short, the best 5 card hand that you can make wins. In this case, you're both playing the board.

There is a similar question here, What is the“Top Five Cards” rule and how does it apply to splitting pots?, explaining the scenario in more detail.

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Why should I split if I have a connection and he doesn't? For my logic it's wrong. –  Anna Feb 9 '13 at 22:11
    
I already read it but it's not the same. –  Anna Feb 9 '13 at 22:14
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Community cards can be used by all players, thus your connection doesn't matter. Only the relative ranking of a players qualifying hand. As for the logic of it all, it's a man-made game, so if anything, the rules are arbitrary. –  Toby Booth Feb 9 '13 at 22:15
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@Anna The rules say the best 5 card hand is played. The fact that you have an extra 10 is immaterial by rule. The term counterfeited often applies in these cases where you have a made hand and cards come that nullify cards in your hand. –  Rich Shealer Feb 11 '13 at 2:53
    
Basically you both have 7 cards of which to make the best 5 card hand. Thats 2 personal cards and 5 common cards. In this case the best hand possibly consisted of all 5 common cards (the 2 cards in each of your hands could be ripped up and thrown away), thus its a split pot. If your card made it a royal flush then you would win, however I guess that was not the case, so it was a draw. –  Kevin Anthony Oppegaard Rose Feb 13 '13 at 15:42
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