Poker Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for serious players and enthusiasts of poker. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

Say player A initially raises the bet to 2200, player B re-raises to 5200, player C calls 5200, and players D and E fold. Player A then shoves all-in for 8200 total. Does this open the betting round for player B to re-raise?

share|improve this question
    
Yes, and by precisely the minimum. The betting was 2200 + 3000 + 3000. If that last amount had been less than 3000, then the betting would be closed. – Lee Daniel Crocker Dec 15 '15 at 21:36

According to the World Series of Poker No-Limit & Pot-Limit rules page, yes, player B has the option to reraise because it is just enough to reopen the betting round.

All raises must be equal to or greater than the size of the previous bet or raise on that betting round, except for an all-in wager. A player who has already acted and is not facing a fullsize wager may not subsequently raise an all-in bet that is less than the minimum bet (which is the amount of the minimum bring-in), or less than the full size of the last bet or raise. (The half-the-size rule for reopening the betting is for limit poker only.) Example: Player A bets $100 and Player B raises $100 more, making the total bet $200. If Player C goes all in for less than $300 total (not a full $100 raise), and Player A calls, then Player B has no option to raise again, because he wasn't fully raised. (Player A could have raised, because Player B raised.)

So, in this case:

Player A raised to $2200
Player B reraises $3000 to make the total bet $5200
Player C calls $5200
Player A reraises $3000 to make the total bet $8200

Thus, player A only needed to raise $3000 to open the betting round again — which he did.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.