Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

If your laying down AK to a loose cannon that is raising all in all the time you are making a huge mistake. These calls you made all in were just fine. You will get the guy sooner or later. The 99 he had you were slightly behind but for the Qx you dominated. I will sometimes get out of games like this, usually because I am not able to get the guy and ...


7

You haven't provided enough information. This is entirely dependent on what the action was leading to the all-in, current stack sizes, and the frequency with which your opponent is taking said action. I can tell you, just from experience, that your opponent would either need to be very short stacked, ~13-15BB or less, or jamming all-in with a very wide ...


7

You also have to take into account whether you are playing a tournament or Cashgame. For tournaments, the ruling is as described by Radu Murzea In Cashgames, there is usually no showdown until the river is dealt. The player who has gone all in has to show his cards first. The player who called can then still muck his cards if he cannot beat his opponents ...


6

It is definitely profitable to be calling with AKo and AKs against someone shoving 100% of their hands. Using the Poker stove calculator, AKo will win 65.20% of the time against an opponent's random holding, and will still win 62.12% of the time against an opponent who shoves only with the top 20% of hands dealt. Similarly AKs wins 67% of the time against ...


6

The rule is: The cards must be shown in the case of all-in when there are no more possible moves (fold/check/bet/raise) to be made by any of the players that are in the hand. Now, this happens when: all the chips of the participanting players are in the pot there is only player in the hand that has chips. This is so because, since he's the only one left ...


6

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


5

My short answer is this: as long as your opponents have 100BBs, it doesn't matter how many BBs you have (as long as you have them covered). You will only play for their 100 BBs. Shoving every hand when you have 10000 BBs is as bad as shoving every hand when you have 100 BBs. The difference is that in former case you don't have to re-buy every time after you ...


5

See here: How are side pots built? . I don't think the rules about side pots will change if a player is so severely short stacked. In your particular case, I think it will be: Main Pot: 40 (10 from each player, since player 2 has the fewest chips) Side Pot 1: 60 (player 1 has 20 left, so players 3 and 4 also put 20 chips in. 3 x 20 = 60). Side Pot 2: 40 ...


4

Firstly, the term "short stack" only really relates to a pre-flop description of relative stack sizes of all players. It doesn't have a reasonable use after the action has started. That said, a player may be "short stacked" post-flop but that's entirely down to what action has occurred. Specific to the example, player A can only call the All-In for $7, ...


4

Yes, definitely go all-in. Most people go all-in pre-flop with hands way worse than KK, e.g., AK, AQ, QQ, JJ. And statistically speaking, KK is only worse than AA, so you should definitely go all-in.


4

This sounds like a play money game, am I correct? If so, then I can assure you these same people would not be doing this in a real money game in almost all typical circumstances, except maybe a tournament structure where the blinds are very high relative to stack sizes. The simple answer to your second problem is, a better starting hand than your ...


4

It depends on a lot of things. The first thing to consider regardless of your cards is how well do you manage your bankroll ? If you are playing for all the money you have in your life then the answer is easy here... Even with AA you should fold, and you should leave the table and play some lower stakes. Even if the math shows a positive expected value you ...


4

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


3

I would go back a little further than the point you're asking about here. When the cards are being dealt out, your stack is ten big blinds, and the blinds are coming up fast. I think you're in territory where your only options are fold or open-shove, and you may not have the luxury of waiting for a better hand to come along. Given the way the hand actually ...


3

It's important to realize that running it more than once does not change the odds at all. It will only reduce the variance for you and your opponent. If you want to reduce your variance as much as possible, you could run it as many times as the stub (remaining cards in the deck) would permit. Even more efficient would be to just chop the pot based on your ...


3

The only one I've heard is something like "x-way all-in", for example "There's 4-way all-in".


3

This is actually an interesting question and not because it might relate to good strategy when considering hand equity match-ups or Expected Value, (let's face it, random All-In shoves every hand don't fair well in terms of overall strategies) but because it's a good example of bankroll management, and how people misapply it. The key concept here is how ...


3

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


3

You lose as many chips as he had, the rest of chips are considered the same as an uncalled raise and are returned to you.


3

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have to be $70. There are a few places I've been with a house rule that an all-in of more than half the proper amount does constitute a raise, and so in one of those ...


3

No. Player 2 can either call by putting in 100 to match the big blind here, or he can raise to any amount 200 (100 big blind + 100) or more. Then players 3 and 4 will have their right to act, during which they can each opt to call, raise, or fold when the action is on them. A player going all-in for less than the blind doesn't eliminate those players' right ...


2

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. • If a player goes all-in for less than the minimum legal raise after the open raiser, and is called by at least another player, the open raiser will only be ...


2

This question is actually very similar to the "double your bet" strategy for baccarat, or any other close to even odds game. Casinos typically will always have a table max bet for these games to prevent some billionaire from coming in and keep doubling their bet until win back all of their loses. The number of times you can lose before you hit the limit is ...


2

Was this [calling all-in] good playing or bold (and mindless) move? This should be a snap call. AQs is just far too strong to fold. Villian would have to be 3-bet shoving a very tight range to justify folding here. Specifically, he would have to be jamming {33+, AQ+, AJs} for it to be unprofitable to call his all-in. The average opponent is 3-bet shoving ...


2

Funny that I should come across this question shortly after leaving this comment. To expand on it: As always, the answer is "follow the rules of the house you're in." Most poker rooms in casinos (at least, the ones I've seen) will address this issue in the fine print of their rules, which you can usually find online and at the registration desk/brush stand. ...


2

I think Jon's and Pops' answers are both good, particularly Jon's sentiment that you're too short to play around here. I mostly just wanted to comment on your comment near the end of your question: should have called for a cheap card I think this is wrong. You were short at the start of the hand, and you're really short-stacked on this flop, with the ...


2

You think he's on a flush draw but he probably has a high Ax or a high pair. Even if you're 100% sure that he holds 2 hearts eg. 9♥8♥, the correct play is to bet/raise 50% (or more) of the pot on the Turn to give him at least 25% pot odds while he has about 20% card odds with 1 card to come to hit his hypothetical flush. You can try to bet ...


2

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


2

"Table stakes" rules are essentially as old as poker itself. My copy of Foster's Practical Poker (1905) says that some games would allow borrowing or going to pocket, but even then going all in was more common. There was an extra important rule: if you borrowed or went to pocket in order to raise, you were no longer allowed to go all in if reraised, but had ...


2

I've found this in the wsop tournament rules: Exposing Cards and Proper Folding: A participant exposing his or her cards with action pending will incur a penalty, but will not have a dead hand. The penalty will begin at the end of the hand. All participants at the table are entitled to see the exposed card(s). When folding, cards should be pushed ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible