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7

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


5

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


4

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

It is true that running it multiple times will not influence the expected value and therefore the hand of the other player does not matter in the decision to run it multiple times. As an example: Player A has a probability of 0.9 to win the pot of €2000,- and Player B a probability of 0.1. The expected value for a single run: Player A: 0.9 * 2000 = ...


3

if your bet leaves you with the stack less than the bet itself, you should have gone all in on the flop. In general, if your bet takes the third of your stack you have to go all-in.


3

It seems the app is poorly designed. If you raise and win a pot your stack still goes down. The developer forgot to add the winning amount back to the winners stack. So as far as the game is concerned after an all in the player is out of the game as they have no chips. As for all-in betting, if it's a no limit game you can bet everything you have at any ...


3

Short answer: no, player 1 can't raise here. Assuming here that player 1 opens the betting in your example, player 2's all-in is less than an official raise, so it does not re-open the betting for a player who has already acted. Player 3 is free to raise here because he has not yet acted, but he elects to call instead. If player 3 had raised, player 1 ...


3

Player three wins the money from the other players that match player three's money. In this case player three is going to get the main pot, which is seventy five. That is twenty five from player one, twenty five from player two and player three's original betting. Player one or two only wins the seventy five in the main pot if he can show down a better ...


3

Your "paradox" arises from the fact that aside from your bet, the pot contains enough expected value already for each player that neither could improve their expected ending stack by folding. With too small of a stack, you can't bet enough so that the opponent loses money. However, with your bet you can still reduce the expected overall gain from his point ...


3

We need a bit more information. Starting stacks, bets pre-flop etc. From what it sounds like so far you should have pushed all in pre-flop or after the flop. One thing I disagree with however is when you said that in the long run you would lose money to a flush draw. If you are positive you have him beat and the only thing that will save him is if he ...


3

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have to be $70. There are a few places I've been with a house rule that an all-in of more than half the proper amount does constitute a raise, and so in one of those ...


3

You lose as many chips as he had, the rest of chips are considered the same as an uncalled raise and are returned to you.


3

No. Player 2 can either call by putting in 100 to match the big blind here, or he can raise to any amount 200 (100 big blind + 100) or more. Then players 3 and 4 will have their right to act, during which they can each opt to call, raise, or fold when the action is on them. A player going all-in for less than the blind doesn't eliminate those players' right ...


2

I've found this in the wsop tournament rules: Exposing Cards and Proper Folding: A participant exposing his or her cards with action pending will incur a penalty, but will not have a dead hand. The penalty will begin at the end of the hand. All participants at the table are entitled to see the exposed card(s). When folding, cards should be pushed ...


2

"Table stakes" rules are essentially as old as poker itself. My copy of Foster's Practical Poker (1905) says that some games would allow borrowing or going to pocket, but even then going all in was more common. There was an extra important rule: if you borrowed or went to pocket in order to raise, you were no longer allowed to go all in if reraised, but had ...


2

You think he's on a flush draw but he probably has a high Ax or a high pair. Even if you're 100% sure that he holds 2 hearts eg. 9♥8♥, the correct play is to bet/raise 50% (or more) of the pot on the Turn to give him at least 25% pot odds while he has about 20% card odds with 1 card to come to hit his hypothetical flush. You can try to bet ...


2

When you are short stacked you unfortunately don't have the chips to force a bad decision. Accept the opponent is not going to fold. 1/4 pot bet is not going to get them off a flush draw. If you are short stacked then you need to look at it as you are getting 4:1 and you are not going to get a better chance to get your money in. If you held back and ...


2

No, no. The "current bet amount" is 100, the big blind. Each player in turn facing that must call 100 if he can, go all in short if he can't, or raise. The fact that a player went all in short ahead of you does not in any way affect your options. For the next player it's 100 to call, or 200 or more to raise. If a player goes all-in for an exact call, then ...


1

First I would not necessarily put him on a flush draw. He raised pre flop with only you. Flush draw does not play well head up and you know he does not have the Ace. $100 preflop with even K little suited is very aggressive. A flush draw would likely just call the $30 on the flop to see another card for free. $100 is more of a value bet. On the draw why ...


1

I think it is marginal to play that from the BB 8-9 suited would be been (maybe) OK Preflop you were getting 3.5 : 2 A flush has the chance of stacking an aggressive player You would be playing it for the implied odds But since you only started the hand with like $65 you don't even have that great of implied odds You were getting pot odds to call the $6 ...


1

Basically if you believe that you have the player beat and that he will call I would shove, otherwise I would just let him donk off some more money. Since you have 84% chance of winning, the ideal is to get as much from him as possible. If you believe he has an ace or draw at this point, you just need to estimate the likelihood that he is going to call. ...



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