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7

Since I rarely play cash games, I'll only talk about tournaments. When it comes to tournaments, the bankroll you choose must depend on both your skill level and on your financial possibilies. You may be a millionare, but starting to play tournaments that have $5000 as buy-in is definitely not a good idea. Basically, my rule is at least 60 buy-ins for ...


6

The two most well known database management tools are PokerTracker (I have this one) and Holdem Manager. Both are very good, but I prefer PT's extensibilty using PostgreSQL. Also, evplusplus have other useful things, like a Risk of Ruin calculator, Winrate Confidence calculator and bankroll management simulator that I've used extensively to model how I ...


5

First off, 200 times the big blind is NEVER* enough. That's two buy-ins. If that were your bankroll, you would go broke, even if you were the best poker player on the planet. Now then... SoboLAN's answer was a great one for MTTs. For SNGs, you can probably start out a bit lower than that - around 60% of his recommendation should be ok if you are playing a ...


5

Typically, live play will mean you're seeing between 30-50 hands per hour. In your case, this will mean that you've seen somewhere in the region of 7,000 hands. This is an incredibly low number to make any significant, reliable assumptions about the StDev of your win-rate. The data set simply isn't large enough to be approaching what we'd consider a normal ...


4

If you know your winrate and your standard deviation information you should be able to estimate your bankroll requirements by looking at the ev++ variance calculator. You'll see a good amount of information here about longest breakeven and downswings and other winrate related estimates: http://www.evplusplus.com/poker_tools/variance_simulator/ For ...


3

If it doesn't cost you anything to withdraw or deposit (no fees), I don't see any benefit of keeping a large bankroll online. Plus it could be a form of money management by keeping a % of your bankroll on a site. If you bust and can't buy in over and over, it will force you to take a break by redepositing and hopefully getting of tilt.


3

Disclaimer: All of what follows applies only to winning players. For non-winning players, none of this matters a whit. I'm not going to discuss actual, hard numbers as most people familiar with StdDev in poker will declare something that can be interpreted as "StdDev is completely useless until you have 100k+ hands," -- a sentiment I disagree with in ...


3

I remember reading on pocket fives a long time ago that you will want one extra buyin, beyond the typical recommendation of 25-40 buyins, for each additional table that you will be playing. 20 buyins is a little on the low side unless you can afford to replace it if you go broke. If you start with 40 buyins, the chance of going broke (assuming that you are ...


2

Deciding how comfortable you are with going bust (a.k.a. Risk of Ruin or RoR), is arguably the most important issue regarding how you personally manage your bankroll. Issues like the depth of your bankroll, how you handle variance, the type of games you play, and potentially your drawdown (if you're living off the income from playing) are part of ...


2

I used to have my bankroll split between various sites and my winning on MoneyBookers (called "Skrill" nowadays). Then I ended up keeping my bankroll mostly on one big site and withdrawing my winnings to my bank account. A huge problem with splitting on different sites is that it's great while your clear bonuses (and reload bonuses) but besides that, it's ...


1

If you can learn patience and the ability to fold small hands to postflop raises then you will be far ahead of most microstakes players when you decide to play for real money.


1

For cash games, when you feel you are by far the best player at the table, you can start playing for real money. Repeat this step on real money tables as well. What I think is interesting are the freeroll tournaments. I really learned a lot by doing this. You will learn playing in position, playing with your stacksize, adapting to new blind levels and so ...


1

Obviously it is not that good of an idea. Better go to a bank and let your money grow there. However, as a European guy, I have thought about this as well. Since on most poker sites, everything is stored as dollars, you could basically deposit an amount when the euro/dollar ration is low and then withdraw your money when the ratio changes in a positive way. ...


1

I would say you should only keep on there, what you don't mind losing, just in case anything was ever to go wrong. I would also stick to the bigger sites to be honest, less chance of them going broke etc. When i win big i tend to take at least half of it out and pay off some bills etc.


1

Although I don't think these are solely poker terms, "Total Money" is equivalent to Bankroll. "Money Invested" is equivalent to Money at Risk or Current Exposure to Risk. Some useful links to answers from this site on the topic of bankroll are: What is a proper starting bankroll? Tools for Managing Bankroll, Income and Losses



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