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28

No, it is absolutely not rude to leave from UTG. Frankly, it a crazy suggestion. What right does anyone have other than yourself to compel you to spend your own money against your will! From any position, it's still your money. I'd suggest they were the rude one for proposing it. Not only is it fine, it's strategically best as it minimizes the cost per hand ...


11

When you sit down, one of three things happens: 1) You pay the big blind because you are in that seat, and then start playing. 2) You wait one or more turns until the big blind comes around to you, and then start playing. 3) If you want to start playing immediately, out of position, you "post" an amount equivalent to the big blind bet to get into the game. ...


9

If they are beginners, their play is completely haotic and makes absolutely no sense. In a weird and ironic way, this makes such players somewhat dangerous... I see this all the time if I play online and enter a tournament that has virtual money as entry fee (yeah, I still do that). In such tournaments, people often go all-in in the absolute first hand with ...


8

In 15+ years of playing in casinos and home games, I have never encountered a rule regarding when one can leave the table. Also, in looking at Robert's Rules of Poker by Bob Ciaffone, I can find no rule regarding when one can leave a game. So, you can get up and leave a table anytime you choose to and it's not rude. Leaving from UTG is a good plan as you ...


6

Your preflop actions look fine. You have the second best starting hand in poker, so 4betting strongly is correct. The 3-5-6 rainbow flop is coordinated, but you worrying about hands like 2-4 and 4-7 is just silly. Think about it: would you call a 4-bet preflop with this kind of hand? Probably not unless you were super deepstacked (which you didn't mention, ...


5

When else would you leave a cash game? By paying a round of blinds, you've paid for the right to play a round of hands. If you don't want to play another round of hands, don't pay another set of blinds. Always be wary of players who say it's rude to not throw your money away.


5

Basically it depends on some factors: the available statistics and notes to the opponents. tournament stage your stack opponent's stack General Big Blind behaviour: we tend to defend blinds against the "stealer", who is more loose/agressive than average we tend to defend blinds in the late tournament stage we tend to defend the blind against the big ...


4

The betting behavior of players does not affect the order in which action takes place in later betting rounds. When new community cards are dealt (flop, turn and river), the new betting round starts with the first player left of the dealer, if he/she hasn't folded in the previous betting round. In the examples you give, nobody folds so this would be the ...


3

Checking in the dark is a high level play to reestablish position on the flop. Like someone else already mentioned, most of the time this is done with drawing hands, as someone with vulnerable hands like AA/KK would most likely never make this move. It is essentially a way of giving away less information regarding your hand and how it relates to the flop. ...


3

Ratio of chips to current pot size always to me play, when you want look poker odds calculator software that will calculate that for you. About chips what you have in stack this depends: when you play tournament then this matter, depends how much your stack is to blind sized you play more open. For calculate that you have Harrington M and SNG PokerStategy ...


3

Dead button - Spots vacated by leaving players who would pay the small blind or get the button during the next hand remain open for the purposes of shifting blinds and button. Thus, the small blind may not be paid in the subsequent hand if the player due to pay the small blind has vacated the spot and, therefore, is considered "dead". However, there is ...


3

You are correct. The blinds are usually paid in advance by either waiting for the button or posting from somewhere in the middle. Therefore, the optimal money management is to leave after your UTG hand. That said, if the game you are playing in is a private game and the players and/or host don't like you leaving in that spot, you probably have a decision to ...


3

This chart shows how position effects expected value, which is what I think you are interested in from reading your question.


3

Pokerstars just released "Zoom". I'm quite sure there are other rooms now releasing their own versions of this format (open-market?), so I wouldn't be suprised if almost all major sites and networks created some type of quick-seat change offering. I got this from Pokerstars: "...you will be randomly seated with a set of players from your chosen game. ...


2

Technically, from what I've seen from the Zoom hands that people sent me from PokerStars, the small blind is always in "Seat 2" and the big blind is always in "Seat 3" (seat numbers on PokerStars starts at one, there are a few, rare, networks, where seat numbers start from 0). The button is always the player sitting at the "Seat 1" and there's always ...


2

Position has no effect on odds, which are determined by relative hand strength and is the same regardless of position. Theoretically speaking, equity is impacted by position but it would be impossible to define as it would be different for every player, and also different for every player against every opponent and further still different for every player ...


2

There may be a few instances that are relative to the setting in which they are used. The numbering, I'm confident, will always move in the direction in which game play progresses. I haven't seen, and doubt I ever will, anything other than that. Some examples... In a casino seat one (1) is almost always be the seat directly to the left of the dealer, if ...


2

Gaz makes a lot of good points. The goal with aces is to get all the money in preflop, but you should absolutely slow down and reevaluate postflop. Board texture, opponent types and tendencies, reads, stack sizes, etc. all come into play after the flop comes out and your opponent is betting and/or not folding to your bets. Don't get married to aces postflop; ...


2

The short answer is that this is just the nature of things when playing for play money. When you get pocket aces, you often can (and should) get all of your chips in pre-flop because most play money players simply don't care. If someone before you raises, you can usually just shove all in and get multiple callers. Long term, you will still make (a lot) ...


2

I think that pre-flop is pretty strange play by your opponents unless you guys are super deep. When you say you raised 3x because of the premium hand you should probably start re-thinking this tactic pre-flop. If you raise 3x with premium hand and 2x with hands that are worse this is pretty exploitable play. I would then say that depending on how deep you ...


2

First of all if you can get someone to commit all of their chips pre flop when you hold Aces then you are doing well. You should be fist pumping at this stage as you are the favourite. If they suck out post flop then thats just varience you did the hard part getting all of your chips in pre which is +EV. You should always play the hand aggressively, but try ...


2

It's best explained using examples: Let's say there are 9 players at the table and the action begins: UTG raises UTG + 1 and UTG + 2 both call UTG + 3 makes a 3-bet Hijack, Cut-Off, Button and the blinds all fold UTG, UTG + 1 and UTG + 2 all call the 3-bet So now, the players in the pot are: UTG, UTG + 1, UTG + 2 and UTG + 3. Because UTG + 3 was the ...


2

There's a 23.30% chance the other players have one of {66+, A7+}. Yes, there is an easy way to calculate the chance of a dominating hand behind you. You can use a program like ProPokerTools Odds Oracle to model the scenario and determine the probabilities. There is a free trial available. Below is a screenshot of the calculation as well as the log file. ...


1

The only options P1 has are to call, raise, or fold. P1 could only check if he had already matched the highest bet (which he hasn't, because of the raise). P2 then has to call the highest bet, raise it, or fold, for the same reasons. The fact that P4 folded has no impact on what options P1 and P2 have. Edit based on comment: The round (pre-flop, flop, ...


1

Position 1 is the first person to act. In a no-blind game this is the person to the left of the dealer. In a game with one or more blinds, this is the first person to have a choice of acting (fold, call, raise). After the first betting round, postion 1 is to the left of the dealer.


1

Interesting question. A good thought experiment perhaps. Firstly, something to consider is was he closing the action pre-flop when he called? This really isnt something you'll encounter very often, so i'd be inclined to give it almost no significance, until I could establish how my opponent was using it in their own unique way. Obviously, that's not going ...


1

People use to blind check when they don't want to show their weakness. they are sitting on a draw and are hoping to complete it. when they first see the flop and then check they are showing "weakness". so your info is, that he is setting up a trap or he has a draw. when they instantly checking you will never know if they probably completed their "draw". I ...


1

To make it simple, Bear in mind that, for those who called your raise in pre-flop, very likely they have an Ace on hand. So basically if there's no Aces on flop, I would raise or even go all-in, not to allow them to draw the chance of catching a pair of Ace. But if an Ace came out, I would definitely just check.


1

In the early stages of a tournament, you want to survive the weeding out of the unfit. Hence, you tend not to defend, unless your hand is reasonably good. In the later stages of a tournament, you are playing against survivors. Hence you need to play "reasonable" blind hands that offer any hope, and fold only your worst ones. That said, you defend more ...


1

You can leave a game (permanently) at any time. We're not talking about taking a few hands off to take a smoke - if someone does that in my game, they post their blinds automatically. The only (unwritten) rule we have in our game about leaving is that it's not cool to win a giant pot and then get up right away and leave the game. Of course, some of the ...



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