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18

This is very much related to this question: How big an edge can you have on a tournament field ? ROI vs edge question You have to balance the chance that your hand will win against a random hand with the actual advantage you gain from getting their stack. In general, I'd advise folding with less than a premium pocket pair preflop, and continuing on the flop ...


13

The general rule of thumb from me would be to stick with the same raise you would make in the same situation with T9s. You want to balance your range so that you get a good mix of action with your great hands and folds with your steals. What that raise should be will depend a lot on your history with the blinds and on their stack sizes. Whether we are ...


9

Using PP's solely to flop sets isn't a winning strategy. (note: I'll stick to talking about open-betting pre-flop and not cold-calling which leads to similar post-flop situations, but infers different ranges for all players involved. Also, I consider small PP's 22-88; mid PP's 99-TT; and big PP's to be JJ-AA. JJ is a special case. Closer to being a mid ...


9

This will be pretty messy if I don't define some variables, so here goes: P$ = Current size of the pot S$ = Minimum of your stack vs your opponent's stack F% = Chance of your opponent folding to your shove (this should be between 0 and 1; divide percentages by 100 to get corresponding value) W% = Chance of you winning when called (this should be between 0 ...


9

Your second question is unanswerable. Estimating what the mix of styles in a tournament will be on average is too inflexible an assumption for any strategic use. Your first question is more interesting and problematic. Can we play small-ball poker in a cash-game? Yes, but it takes far greater personal involvement from the player, and frankly doesn't lead to ...


9

If they are beginners, their play is completely haotic and makes absolutely no sense. In a weird and ironic way, this makes such players somewhat dangerous... I see this all the time if I play online and enter a tournament that has virtual money as entry fee (yeah, I still do that). In such tournaments, people often go all-in in the absolute first hand with ...


9

Sounds like you had an 18K stack preflop, or about 30bbs. The 3K raise is fairly standard, though you shouldn't only raise that size with hands like AA because perceptive opponents can figure that sort of thing out if they play enough hands with you (then again, if no one at your table is perceptive, go ahead and play in an exploitable way). On the flop ...


8

Honestly, I think that small ball strategy is significantly more effective in cash games. Many of the benefits it provides center around people adjusting to your image. In tournaments, that can all go down the drain when players are moved to different tables. By contrast, in cash games you are much more likely to play a large number of hands against the same ...


8

Ask yourself what Btn is likely to have for his pre-flop raise and continuation bet, and if you just call what are the chances he will bet again on the turn. Check raising here just screams that you have hit your hand (set or two pair) so you're unlikely to get further action. If you want to check raise, much better to at least give him another chance to bet ...


7

Depends on how much often this all-in is presenting by for example using hud statistics software, you can measure this and push at least for example 20% of his range counting from top of course. Then full range is 100%, his all-in range is 60% (i assuming this is top 60%) then you calling 12% (60% of 20%) top hands. If you want measure this you can do this ...


7

You hinted at the answer in the last line of your question: play online for low stakes. Unless you are in Utah or Washington (or there's another state that criminalized online play which I somehow never heard about), then you do still have access to real money online play - just not at Pokerstars or the other sites that used to be big in the US. You can ...


7

Check raising can be used to punish people who auto-bet in position too often. It's also good for semi-bluffing or building a pot when you've got a made hand vs normal betting frequencies. It's part of a balanced strategy. If every time you have a hand you donk and every time you check you either check-call or check-fold then your opponents can take ...


6

Against an unknown opponent, stack sizes dominate the decision for me. If we have a big stack and he has an average-to-medium-but-not-short stack, then I'll raise a lot until he shuts me down. Similarly, if we both have medium stacks, I'll probably still raise a fair amount - if we cover him by a fair margin, this frequency goes up. If either one of us has ...


6

By definition, a continuation bet is a bet made on one betting round after you were the aggressor in the previous betting round. Continuation bets are typically made regardless of whether or not the cards that came improved your hand. Most often the term applies to bets made during the second round of betting (the flop in Texas Hold'em) after aggression ...


6

What @Jeffrey Blake said, is totally correct, however there are situations when you don't need to balance you range in this situation at all, for example against players who doesn't care and calling anyway, you should make as big bets as you can to make more profit. Also, against players who are not observant at all, you might make bigger bets, because they ...


5

There are so many things to consider when coming to a conclusion about how to play not just AA, but any hand. Not the least of which is: Game Type & Format Stack Sizes Opponent Skill Hero's Image Opponent Tendancies Metagame (ie, history) Board Texture Opponent's Likely Range The list goes on and on. However, as a general rule of thumb (to which ...


5

There are quite a few things we need to address here. I'm going to do my best to break them down point-by-point. First off... AK is not favorite to win against so many players, is it really profitable in the long run? What should i look for in this 2 situations to decide if it's profitable on the long run? Should i consider play AQ as well in this ...


5

Basically it depends on some factors: the available statistics and notes to the opponents. tournament stage your stack opponent's stack General Big Blind behaviour: we tend to defend blinds against the "stealer", who is more loose/agressive than average we tend to defend blinds in the late tournament stage we tend to defend the blind against the big ...


5

The books I have read by professional poker players discuss the check raise as part of a balanced strategy and discuss its use. The authors specifically point out that is perfectly acceptable. I surmise that those who object simply don't like having to cope with this particular tactic. If its a game among family or friends and someone objects, you might ...


4

Unless you are truly expert, small ball is just an excuse to play loose and weak and likely to be a losing strategy. What you should do instead is focus on the other players at the table and try to adjust to the way they are playing. See if you can figure out what kind of mistakes they tend to make and play in a way that has the best chance of exploiting ...


4

Since you didn't engage any money yet if you call you would do $2 but the minimum amount for a raise there is $4 since the $2 is from the max amount that was bet in the table and the next amount you can place is $2(max bet)+$2(BB). Answer:$4 Some casino's might have some rules and sometimes they aren't the same as in other casino's.


4

Obviously, the nuance you're considering is valid. Our ability to outplay this opponent and whether that is more valuable in the long run than just taking a more volatile approach and trying to get stacks in now is worth considering. That said... A8s is approximately within the top 13% of hands depending on how you use hand rankings but it's very close ...


4

Ignoring the fact that he called with 75o (as that does prove your point), what makes you conclude that this opponent is a weaker player? Often in Heads-up tournament play, the best strategy is to play A LOT of hands and play them very aggressively. It sounds like this is what he was doing. If he's aggressive enough to make it hard to whittle him down, you ...


4

When you move to limit, math is going to be a much bigger part of your play. You have to learn to correctly calculate pot odds and implied odds, since it is very different. You can and should read whole books on the subject of limit play, because it is very different. To summarize the MAJOR points that change. Open ended straights on the flop on ...


4

In the end, any formulaic starting hand strategy is going to suffer from major weaknesses due to the fact that it fails to make the proper adjustments for the specific players you are playing against. Chen's formula is no exception. If you're just starting out, this provides as good a strategy as any for giving you a place to start. It will point you in the ...


4

Firstly, you should realize that when you're playing against novice players you're in a good situation because it'll be easier to capitalize on their mistakes (since they'll tend to make more of them than experienced players). Secondly, their playing styles are very important - not all novice players play the same (in fact, not all novice players online ...


4

Well, obviously like everything in poker, the answer is: "it depends". Let's strip it down to its core: Pocket pairs are good because if you go against an opponent that doesn't have a pocket pair, he needs to hit the flop/turn/river somehow in order to have showdown value. You don't have to connect to the flop to do this, because you already have a pair. ...


4

Other than mining published tournament data or summaries of your own data sets, I don't believe there are direct avenues to access this specific kind of data. That said I'd be willing to bet, with almost absolute certainty, that there isn't a tourney in history (with significant participants) where the winner wasn't all in at some point prior to the final ...


4

Strategy itself is a fluid thing, and although the flow of a game and the effective strategy to beat it will constantly change, the fundamentals of good strategy don't. Wherever you play poker, it's still the same game, play money or real money! Simply put, if you let the type of game interfere with what you believe/know to be an effective strategy, then ...


4

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...



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