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7

It depends! What are your definitions of "conservatively" and "good hand" and "couple of chips"? And how long had you been playing at this game, allowing your opponents to develop an impression of your play? First, you can't make any generalizations based on this single hand. The fact that you got dealt AA doesn't entitle you to win a big pot. It could ...


7

Check raising can be used to punish people who auto-bet in position too often. It's also good for semi-bluffing or building a pot when you've got a made hand vs normal betting frequencies. It's part of a balanced strategy. If every time you have a hand you donk and every time you check you either check-call or check-fold then your opponents can take ...


5

The books I have read by professional poker players discuss the check raise as part of a balanced strategy and discuss its use. The authors specifically point out that is perfectly acceptable. I surmise that those who object simply don't like having to cope with this particular tactic. If its a game among family or friends and someone objects, you might ...


5

OK, let's break it down mathematically. I'm going to use a standard poker equity calculator for this. You have T⋄ 9⋄ You say the all-in player had a medium pocket pair. For this "exercise", let's pick 8♠8♣ Let's consider the third player a typical tight-agressive player, in this case with a standard 18% Range of hands preflop ...


4

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...


4

When you bet and you get raised, is there a situation where it is justified to just call instead of raising or folding? In general I would say no. Lets think about this for each scenario. Passive Fish A passive fishy player re-raises you on the flop, you should fold. Passive fish are calling stations, not raisers. When they raise it is because they a ...


4

This sounds like a play money game, am I correct? If so, then I can assure you these same people would not be doing this in a real money game in almost all typical circumstances, except maybe a tournament structure where the blinds are very high relative to stack sizes. The simple answer to your second problem is, a better starting hand than your ...


4

The best way to beat this kind of player is tight-aggressive. you're not going to outplay this one, you're not going to bluff them, and you're certainly not going to be able to control them. All you can do is beat them. But it requires very disciplined uncreative play. You let them self destruct right into your stack. This kind of player is going to raise ...


3

The answer to this question addresses the 100 hands before you got your AA, not the AA itself. If you get AA, then usually cram and press pre-flop. Unless, of course, you feel unusually lucky and feel like playing a subtle hand and try to outplay your opponents - good luck. As Doyle Brunson put it, AA is a great way to win a small pot or loose a big one. ...


3

What kind of plays could I make to convince my opponents that I have a polarised hand range? You don't make plays to convince your opponents that you have a polarized hand range, you just polarize your hand range. If they fail to pick up on that, you've profited greatly. There are generally three types of ranges: Polarized With a polarized range, your ...


3

Stud Hi and Stud 8 are usually played as limit games. In these games there are four types of bets: the ante, the bring-in, the small bet and the big bet. To refer to the stakes of a stud game you would at least name the small and the big bet, so for instance: a $500/$1000 game. The ante is paid before any cards are dealt and is usually very small, between ...


3

It's not just home games that view check-raising as "pejorative" as you say. Most of the lowball games spread in Southern California flat-out banned check-raising. The other answers are generally correct... the reasons you would check-raise are the same as why you would bet out. Sometimes, though, check-raising makes a lot more sense than just betting out ...


3

This has to do with the fact that late-position players in a poker hand have an advantage, having seen what early position players did, or didn't do. A check raise represents an attempt by an early position player to reverse the order. That is, he will wait for the late position player to bet first, before showing his strength. If a player never check ...


3

It sounds like we're looking for game states. Assumptions: The game is Texas Hold 'Em We round bets to multiples of the big blind for calculating state We don't distinguish between raising and re-re-re-re-raising because we only care about "betting / checking outcomes." For the sake of example, we'll assume $0.50 / $1.00 blinds with a $100 buy-in. The ...


3

Your question is a great example of some of the math that you need to carry out at the table. The first part is to know the value you're getting from the situation. Since Gus is calling a smaller amount than what's in the pot, there's an overlay available. To do this you take the pot divided by the amount you have to call: 5200/2200 = 2.36. You can express ...


2

that is good question. I was thinking about this as well. I found it useful in some scenarios. Consider this: you got very strong hand and at first you don't know if your opponent(s) are interested in playing further, so you don't bet allowing them to see free card and extract some value on further streets. But as soon as one of the opponent bets - that ...


2

The question, as always, is, "Why is this person still playing?" If you are up against someone whom you know chases wild draws, like drawing to a flush with only three suited cards, then you may well get busted when they actually do get lucky and flop a set. On the other hand, if the player isn't a loose cannon, but limped in and calls bets on the flop, ...


2

I would say it would be flawed to raise every time with pocket pairs in order to hit a set but depending on the players at the table it MAY (and this is a big may as it hinges on your opponents sloppy post flop play) not be incorrect to at least call in every position to hit a set. This largely hinges on you winning typically about say 12:1 on your money ...


2

Sometimes you realy can't avoid it It realy depends what type of game you are playing if it's super turbo or turbo where you are < 10 BB i guess shoving PF is the right play. If you have no information about your player and you have 20BB in a fast pace game i don't think you can avoid an all in either because of the 5-7BB PF raise. Tournament play and ...


2

I decided to have a go at answering this myself. The situation is you against one other player who has a made hand, and you have N outs. Before the turn, the 1-step EV (ignoring any bets on the river) is EV1 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * (-10) The two-step EV, taking river bets into account, is EV2 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * [ N/46 * (X + 20) + (46-N)/46 ...


2

Your raise size pre is pretty standard, but given you read on the UTG willing to play anything, I would raise slightly larger. Flop: shove is standard, any bet is effectively a shove anyways since you cannot bet/fold. You have a SPR(Stack to pot ratio) of 1.16 to the BB and greater than 1:1 against the UTG. Checking the flop is just bad.


2

Getting your money in good basically mean to put yourself in an all in situation by making the right decision. In my experience different players might put slightly different meanings behind it: (but the overall idea is that your play is good) Some people can say that you get your money in when you go all in and you have a hand that has better chance of ...


2

I agree with @david Hirst answer and reasoning. At the end, it always depends on how well you know the opponent player. You didn't mention in your question what sort of a game it was. Is it a tournament or a cash table. What about stakes? Are you the chip leader or the caller is the chip leader , or neither? These are important considerations too. Finally, ...


2

IMHO, even if you manage to calculate your odds perfectly well, in every hand, if you are sit in a 9 players table, you'd win the pot 1/9 time (in a purely probabilistic way). Now, just try to imagine if your hands are weak before the flop (or turn/river) and someone, for any reason, breaks the odd every hand you play, because he saw you were playing that ...


2

The biggest mistake I see people make is NOT folding to tight players. And NOT saving a bet on the river just because the pot is so big. Fold the river if you know ur beat. It should be obvious after the Turn betting who is on a draw. If the flush or st8 card comes on the river and a tight player bets- Fold the to the 20$ bet even if the pot is 200$. Because ...


2

The more you get into the game, the more aggressive it gets so this is something you'll need to get used to if you want to progress. I'd recommend finding out if they're loose or passive aggressive first before trying to pick them off. To get a handle on this, you'll need to see a few of their showdowns. If they're playing the occasional wild hand then ...


2

I would suggest you have a read up on Pot Odds Here are a few sites: Pot Odds Wikipedia The Poker bank pot odds Hopefully these will help you understand.


1

Personally, I'm limping 9 times out of 10 in this specific situation, depending on my table image and my history with those players. Such a wasted opportunity to push them out most of the time. Give them 4 chances to bluff or catch a decent but worse hand, and if they don't and you min-bet the river and turn over Aces, everybody will be wondering why you ...


1

These are all great answers. I use one of two strategies in this situation. I will always raise, it's just a matter of how much. The only time I don't raise pre-flop with AA is when I'm early in position and I know there is a wild canon to my left and I can come over the top. So I'm guessing the situation is that only the SB and BB remain to your left. ...


1

In the scenario you've mentioned, I'd personally be inclined to bet the pot rather than shoving as it is the best of both worlds. If you're called or re-raised, you know they have something. Whereas if they call your shove, you are committed. Sure if you hit a set later you can play a stop and go or such like. To me, getting your money in good is about ...



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