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5

Having a set, i would only check the flop if: ..it was dry like 3⋄8♥J♣ My reasoning is there are not enough high cards and draws for someone to have hit something and following me. There's no other case in my book for slowplaying a set. Slowplaying is overrated and a nice way to lose a whole street of value. On a flop of 78T i'm ...


5

TLDR: You can do this...once in a while...but it shouldn't be your standard play. Rather than "double bluff", I would usually refer to this as "disguising your hand". Obviously the goal in any hand is to maximize the amount you expect to win (or minimize losses), so let's look at what impact just calling with pocket aces might have. You say that the point ...


3

That depends on what you're contemplating, and what you think future action will be. For example, if you're contemplating a bet that will put you or your opponent all in, then the odds of the next two cards are what matters, because you're buying the right to see both of them. But if you're contemplating calling for a draw, and you both have stacks, well ...


3

This depends on number of things you have to consider, not only the direct odds. What I mean: The pure odds you calculate should be used if you expect your opponent to check the turn and you see free river. Always calculate implied odds! People usually bet on turn and river! If you expect your opponent to bet on the turn, you have to calculate this too - ...


3

Your money already in the pot is water under the bridge. But when you put the money in the pot consider there will likely be future bets to call. You have to consider: Position(s) that put money in Size of the bet(s) Player(s) range from that position Player(s) stack size If you are calling from anything but the blinds then you have position You ...


3

Your "paradox" arises from the fact that aside from your bet, the pot contains enough expected value already for each player that neither could improve their expected ending stack by folding. With too small of a stack, you can't bet enough so that the opponent loses money. However, with your bet you can still reduce the expected overall gain from his point ...


3

We need a bit more information. Starting stacks, bets pre-flop etc. From what it sounds like so far you should have pushed all in pre-flop or after the flop. One thing I disagree with however is when you said that in the long run you would lose money to a flush draw. If you are positive you have him beat and the only thing that will save him is if he ...


3

if your bet leaves you with the stack less than the bet itself, you should have gone all in on the flop. In general, if your bet takes the third of your stack you have to go all-in.


3

It's good that you're considering pot odds when drawing to a hand, but your way of thinking about this is flawed for a few reasons (the third reason being the biggest). For one, the pot odds you get/give on the flop should only be compared to your odds of improving on the turn; after all, the turn will bring another round of possible betting where ...


2

The heads up game is much more complex than this. you need to adapt to your opponent. Effective is probably not the right word. In heads up bluffing is necessary. You need to play more hands. the tighter your opponent is, the easier it should be. Better even is a loose opponent preflop and tight post flop :) Also bluffing requires a good understanding of ...


2

So you've got the question, the answer, and the reasoning behind it. Yes, bluffing is more useful and effective in a two player game (heads-up), compared to bigger tables. The only thing left to mention here is that your opponent probably knows this fact. The thing that can make bluffing in heads-up a bit more "complicated" than bigger tables. And as a side ...


2

If everyone is folding to your raises more often than they should, raise more hands. This is particularly true if you have tighter players on your left and action is folded to you. You can either steal blinds pre-flop or win post-flop with a single continuation bet many times when your opponent misses. Sometimes when you have a great hand like AA, nobody ...


2

As a general rule it is a bad idea to have such a telegraphed betting pattern. Even if they're amateur players don't assume they won't be able to pick up on what your bet sizing means. Just because they are amateur's never assume they can't play poker. Certainly thinking players who are tracking the game and paying attention will quickly notice and remember ...


2

When you are short stacked you unfortunately don't have the chips to force a bad decision. Accept the opponent is not going to fold. 1/4 pot bet is not going to get them off a flush draw. If you are short stacked then you need to look at it as you are getting 4:1 and you are not going to get a better chance to get your money in. If you held back and ...


2

As I stated in a comment a big pot is not the proper objective. A big pot you lose is not not good for you. The proper objective is to maximize EV (Expected Value). AA is the best head up hand Lets say bb is $2 and you can get QQ to go all in for $80 you are 80% EV = -80 + .8*(163) = $50.4 Let's say you limp to get three plus you in the pot - problem is ...


2

I think you played fine. Villain had nothing and you got him to pay off 0.46 on the river. Certainly a hand to call with from the blinds. No reason to bet the flop out of position on a draw. I would have checked the turn hoping to get the villain to bet. You don't want to announce you made the flush. On the river you put out a proper sized value bet. ...


2

Yes the board could have a made hand that has hero beat. That board also could have draws that a made hand should chase off. Are you going to shut down with a set? Giving up a set on the flop is not a winning strategy. That is a very wet board that is very likely to have draws. Need to raise to not give draws odds to continue Raise to find out ...


2

"there is a decent chance they are already behind" Is there really? Let's break it down and see. Provided we have T♠T♣ and the flop is 9♥ J♥ T♦. Our opponents might have: Any two hearts. Any Two pair with a Jack. Any straight draw (Any Queen, any 8, or K and 7) Pocket Queens or Pocket eights (interesting straight draws) All the above hands might suck ...


2

"Protecting their hand" means when a player is trying to deny another player the proper odds for catching up in the hand. In other words, they would be making a mathematical mistake by calling.


2

As a general rule, it is most ideal to limp with a hand that has good odds compared to the investment. This is where pot odds and implied odds come into play. This way you can know when it is getting too expensive for you to continue pre-flop versus the odds of getting a winning hand. On a more loose/aggressive table I personally restrict myself to limping ...


1

A safe betting strategy that's almost always better than slow play but almost never optimal: Pre-flop: Always bet some amount when ahead that guarantees all calls. Post-flop Always bet when ahead just enough to pot commit draws. Always pot control when behind. You can optimize at low risk but its a complicated calculation and situation ...


1

Those number are wrong 19.15% turn 19.57% river 34.97% turn or river (I think you are missing that 5 cards are out) At the flop if either are all in then you can count on no more bets on the turn. You have to base it on what you think your opponent will do on the turn If you don't hit If they bet in to you on the flop then highly likely they are going ...


1

I am a mathematician and ran the numbers out of curiosity and for table strategy. p = pot b = bet as fraction of pot - the denominator (number on bottom) So for a pot of 10 a b of 1 is a full pot bet of 10 A b of 2 is 1/2 the pot for a bet of 5 A b of 5 is 1/5 the pot for a bet of 2 The calculation for chips to commit (stack that you want) in 3 even ...


1

I won't give the check to myself but I ran the numbers to see if they supported my intuition Let's just go with 10 BB in the pot preflop I ran the EVs Basically have 3 options play it slow assume 1/3 pot size bet each round villain is smart enough to get away on the river if they don't hit a draw hero will fold river if a draw hits and they did ...


1

I broadly agree with all the comments so far but I would add: For the decent mid-stakes pros I play with, they would be raising the button more than any other position at the table. This is the ideal situation for them as the table loses respect for their button raise and assumes a relatively wide range The exact amount you should bet is dependent on table ...


1

Squeeze play is a specific move that works under the following circumstances: A very aggressive and loose player raises preflop (wide range) A loose player after him calls, since he knows the raiser will have a wide range You currently have a relatively tight table image What you do with a squeeze play is re-raising the pot big, such that the original ...


1

If you are on the draw then you are playing this totally wrong. Betting enough to push your opponent off a flush draw when you are on the draw is purposefully giving yourself the wrong odds. A draws should put as little chips in as possible but still put yourself in a position to get more chips in the pot if you hit. Devalue suited connector in ...


1

Why did you just call preflop? You should have poped to 6 bb to build pot equity, get them to fold (at least the bb), define the hands, and take control. Out of position you might as well take control. Button could have been on a steal. 33 is not that strong if you can just pick up the pot do it - you had 5 bb to pick up. So bb calls you have ...



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