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6

Focus on playing hands that have polarized showdown value. High flush draws and pocket pairs (preflop) are good examples. Basically, against passive callers, the difficulty is that you don't gain information about what they have during the hand, so you have to play only hands where you can be sure you're either leading or losing with high certainty, and ...


5

Having a set, i would only check the flop if: ..it was dry like 3⋄8♥J♣ My reasoning is there are not enough high cards and draws for someone to have hit something and following me. There's no other case in my book for slowplaying a set. Slowplaying is overrated and a nice way to lose a whole street of value. On a flop of 78T i'm ...


4

As I am not allowed to comment below 50 reputation I have to post an answer. I mostly agree with the points of Yang. I would consider playing a Tight Agrgressive (TAG) style of Play as the best optpion here. The general guideline of poker is to maximize your wins and minimize your losses. Meaning to extract the most possible value if you're ahead with smth. ...


3

That depends on what you're contemplating, and what you think future action will be. For example, if you're contemplating a bet that will put you or your opponent all in, then the odds of the next two cards are what matters, because you're buying the right to see both of them. But if you're contemplating calling for a draw, and you both have stacks, well ...


3

Your "paradox" arises from the fact that aside from your bet, the pot contains enough expected value already for each player that neither could improve their expected ending stack by folding. With too small of a stack, you can't bet enough so that the opponent loses money. However, with your bet you can still reduce the expected overall gain from his point ...


3

We need a bit more information. Starting stacks, bets pre-flop etc. From what it sounds like so far you should have pushed all in pre-flop or after the flop. One thing I disagree with however is when you said that in the long run you would lose money to a flush draw. If you are positive you have him beat and the only thing that will save him is if he ...


3

if your bet leaves you with the stack less than the bet itself, you should have gone all in on the flop. In general, if your bet takes the third of your stack you have to go all-in.


3

It's good that you're considering pot odds when drawing to a hand, but your way of thinking about this is flawed for a few reasons (the third reason being the biggest). For one, the pot odds you get/give on the flop should only be compared to your odds of improving on the turn; after all, the turn will bring another round of possible betting where ...


3

This depends on number of things you have to consider, not only the direct odds. What I mean: The pure odds you calculate should be used if you expect your opponent to check the turn and you see free river. Always calculate implied odds! People usually bet on turn and river! If you expect your opponent to bet on the turn, you have to calculate this too - ...


3

Your money already in the pot is water under the bridge. But when you put the money in the pot consider there will likely be future bets to call. You have to consider: Position(s) that put money in Size of the bet(s) Player(s) range from that position Player(s) stack size If you are calling from anything but the blinds then you have position You ...


2

The heads up game is much more complex than this. you need to adapt to your opponent. Effective is probably not the right word. In heads up bluffing is necessary. You need to play more hands. the tighter your opponent is, the easier it should be. Better even is a loose opponent preflop and tight post flop :) Also bluffing requires a good understanding of ...


2

So you've got the question, the answer, and the reasoning behind it. Yes, bluffing is more useful and effective in a two player game (heads-up), compared to bigger tables. The only thing left to mention here is that your opponent probably knows this fact. The thing that can make bluffing in heads-up a bit more "complicated" than bigger tables. And as a side ...


2

If everyone is folding to your raises more often than they should, raise more hands. This is particularly true if you have tighter players on your left and action is folded to you. You can either steal blinds pre-flop or win post-flop with a single continuation bet many times when your opponent misses. Sometimes when you have a great hand like AA, nobody ...


2

As a general rule it is a bad idea to have such a telegraphed betting pattern. Even if they're amateur players don't assume they won't be able to pick up on what your bet sizing means. Just because they are amateur's never assume they can't play poker. Certainly thinking players who are tracking the game and paying attention will quickly notice and remember ...


2

When you are short stacked you unfortunately don't have the chips to force a bad decision. Accept the opponent is not going to fold. 1/4 pot bet is not going to get them off a flush draw. If you are short stacked then you need to look at it as you are getting 4:1 and you are not going to get a better chance to get your money in. If you held back and ...


1

Those number are wrong 19.15% turn 19.57% river 34.97% turn or river (I think you are missing that 5 cards are out) At the flop if either are all in then you can count on no more bets on the turn. You have to base it on what you think your opponent will do on the turn If you don't hit If they bet in to you on the flop then highly likely they are going ...


1

I am a mathematician and ran the numbers out of curiosity and for table strategy. p = pot b = bet as fraction of pot - the denominator (number on bottom) So for a pot of 10 a b of 1 is a full pot bet of 10 A b of 2 is 1/2 the pot for a bet of 5 A b of 5 is 1/5 the pot for a bet of 2 The calculation for chips to commit (stack that you want) in 3 even ...


1

I won't give the check to myself but I ran the numbers to see if they supported my intuition Let's just go with 10 BB in the pot preflop I ran the EVs Basically have 3 options play it slow assume 1/3 pot size bet each round villain is smart enough to get away on the river if they don't hit a draw hero will fold river if a draw hits and they did ...


1

I broadly agree with all the comments so far but I would add: For the decent mid-stakes pros I play with, they would be raising the button more than any other position at the table. This is the ideal situation for them as the table loses respect for their button raise and assumes a relatively wide range The exact amount you should bet is dependent on table ...


1

Squeeze play is a specific move that works under the following circumstances: A very aggressive and loose player raises preflop (wide range) A loose player after him calls, since he knows the raiser will have a wide range You currently have a relatively tight table image What you do with a squeeze play is re-raising the pot big, such that the original ...


1

If you are on the draw then you are playing this totally wrong. Betting enough to push your opponent off a flush draw when you are on the draw is purposefully giving yourself the wrong odds. A draws should put as little chips in as possible but still put yourself in a position to get more chips in the pot if you hit. Devalue suited connector in ...


1

Why did you just call preflop? You should have poped to 6 bb to build pot equity, get them to fold (at least the bb), define the hands, and take control. Out of position you might as well take control. Button could have been on a steal. 33 is not that strong if you can just pick up the pot do it - you had 5 bb to pick up. So bb calls you have ...


1

Although this can be a house-related regulation, it's always good to look at the official TDA, if you read Rule 43, you'll find that the raiser must at least raise the "largest bet or raise of the current round". Well what does that mean? it means that if you want to re-raise the minimum, you need to look at how much was added to the calling amount during ...


1

Yes, the more players you are up against, the less inclined you should be to bluff. Not only is there a chance that one of them might have hand, but also even if you know they don't have a hand (and neither do you), they might just decide to float you (i.e. call with nothing to see if they can steal the pot or catch a card). Since there's some non-zero ...


1

There is a huge amount of resources out there. I'd recommend joining a poker forum like 2+2, they have subforums for nearly everything you could want to learn or talk about. PokerNews also have a strategy section that is updated daily. As for videos, look up a guy called Jason Sommerville, you can find him on youtube and he also streams daily on twitch. He ...


1

Thanks to over-sophisticated answers like the ones given here it took me forever to understand this stuff.. It's actually way easier to calculate: bet/pot+bet -> 2,200/5,200+2,200=0.297 which translates to 30% "pure" pot odds. So you'd need at least a 30% winning chance to profitably call here.


1

Regardless of the situation you have provided, so you can use it in more situations, it depends on the players and how the hand played. There is not one answer, every situation will be different. Simple answer is whatever amount you think will make your opponent fold. Some opponents will see a small bet as scary and that you want to be paid off, some will ...



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