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1

You are describing a strategy called "Slowplaying" or "Sandbagging." It is a common play, and should be in any poker players arsenal, and works best against highly aggressive players who bet regularly with weak holdings. It is a mistake to slowplay strong holdings against passive players, who'd have simply called your raises had you made them.


1

As I stated in a comment a big pot is not the proper objective. A big pot you lose is not not good for you. The proper objective is to maximize EV (Expected Value). AA is the best head up hand Lets say bb is $2 and you can get QQ to go all in for $80 you are 80% EV = -80 + .8*(163) = $50.4 Let's say you limp to get three plus you in the pot - problem is ...


3

TLDR: You can do this...once in a while...but it shouldn't be your standard play. Rather than "double bluff", I would usually refer to this as "disguising your hand". Obviously the goal in any hand is to maximize the amount you expect to win (or minimize losses), so let's look at what impact just calling with pocket aces might have. You say that the point ...


3

Your money already in the pot is water under the bridge. But when you put the money in the pot consider there will likely be future bets to call. You have to consider: Position(s) that put money in Size of the bet(s) Player(s) range from that position Player(s) stack size If you are calling from anything but the blinds then you have position You ...


1

A safe betting strategy that's almost always better than slow play but almost never optimal: Pre-flop: Always bet some amount when ahead that guarantees all calls. Post-flop Always bet when ahead just enough to pot commit draws. Always pot control when behind. You can optimize at low risk but its a complicated calculation and situation ...


0

You always need to consider turn and river bets, yes. It is very important to consider positions. IP, it is much easier to see ways you can make money OTT and OTR, regardless if you hit or miss. OOP it is a bit trickier.


3

This depends on number of things you have to consider, not only the direct odds. What I mean: The pure odds you calculate should be used if you expect your opponent to check the turn and you see free river. Always calculate implied odds! People usually bet on turn and river! If you expect your opponent to bet on the turn, you have to calculate this too - ...


1

Those number are wrong 19.15% turn 19.57% river 34.97% turn or river (I think you are missing that 5 cards are out) At the flop if either are all in then you can count on no more bets on the turn. You have to base it on what you think your opponent will do on the turn If you don't hit If they bet in to you on the flop then highly likely they are going ...


3

That depends on what you're contemplating, and what you think future action will be. For example, if you're contemplating a bet that will put you or your opponent all in, then the odds of the next two cards are what matters, because you're buying the right to see both of them. But if you're contemplating calling for a draw, and you both have stacks, well ...



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