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13

The standard straddle is, in general, a losing proposition. You're trading 2BB for the right to play last preflop. You'll end up playing larger pots out of position, which is a bad thing. You have to have a huge edge against your opposition to make up for the positional disadvantage. Some special situations, where straddling makes sense: Trying to build ...


13

In a cash game, never fold AA preflop. You're always ahead. The only time this might be reasonable is in a tournament, and the reasons would relate directly to ICM calculations. Even then, the situations will be rare where folding AA is reasonable.


12

I think the only realistic options for villain are a missed draw or Tx. I think he'd have gotten more aggressive earlier if he had you preflop. Your line looks a lot like an overpair to me, and as such, he would want to get value out of you if he had trips or a full house. As such, I don't think he shoves the river here if he wanted a call. He knows you ...


11

Your question is slightly all over the place but I'll try to answer it the best I can. First, it seems like you've fallen prey to a common mindset issue many, mostly recreational, poker players have. You shouldn't be measuring your results by what you're currently up or down during one session. You'd be surprised to learn that winning players are really ...


10

Is there an inherent advantage/disadvantage to having a larger stack than your opponent in a cash game? No. There is no advantage nor disadvantage, because you play for his stack, not yours. If you have 75 BBs and he has 40 BBs, the maximum you can win is 40 BBs, the rest of 35 BBs being returned to you. I would think if you expect to have a skill ...


9

Using PP's solely to flop sets isn't a winning strategy. (note: I'll stick to talking about open-betting pre-flop and not cold-calling which leads to similar post-flop situations, but infers different ranges for all players involved. Also, I consider small PP's 22-88; mid PP's 99-TT; and big PP's to be JJ-AA. JJ is a special case. Closer to being a mid ...


9

Theoretically, no. For every dollar you and your opponent add to the pot, you stand to win your dollar back plus some of his, regardless of his hand. However there are a few practical edge-cases worth considering. Trusting the game If this is your first time playing in a home game, there are a few ways this could be a mistake. The first is cheating; ...


8

First, a look at ranges: I think he has AA/KK/Tx/88/33 here no more often than he has JJ or a busted draw (to the straight or the flush). And sometimes he'll turn up with utter crap. So if we say it's an even money bet, we're getting good odds on a call. Second, let's look at history: You noted in the comments that Villian has not let a pot check around. ...


8

Of course it is. If you're a player who knows the game, then having a big stack will also give you a crucial psychological advantage. Your opponents will fold to your bets and raises much more often, this will allow you to make much more effective bluffs. They know that the guy with the big stack is able to go all-in without a significant risk to himself. ...


8

Jam on the flop after the small blind bets $80 into a $210 pot. This is a perfect opportunity to semi-bluff. You have 9 outs to the nut flush and 3 outs to top pair. The only hands that are going to be comfortable calling your all-in are a completed straight or combo draw. You'll get a fair amount of folds from overpairs/top pair in this spot and many good ...


7

Disclaimer: I am a cash game player, so you might consider my opinion to be biased. Cash games tend to run deeper than tournaments. This in turn leads to more post flop play in cash games than in tournaments, as a general rule. Post flop play in a deep cash game, even one that is only 100 BBs deep, can be very difficult. Given that we play against ...


7

If you are a better player than the rest of the players at the table, you want a stack as large as everyone else at the table so that you maximize your winning hands. Having $1 or $1,000,000 more than everyone else at the table makes no difference in terms of the game itself (but might make a difference psychologically).


7

how would you play this hand knowing that the villain is an incredible calling station who will put his entire stack even on the 2nd pair? You did put all your stack when you were way ahead and he called: that is perfect! I'm not saying that's how you should always play KK like that: but versus an opponent which you know cannot fold, the goal is to ...


6

Generally, as stacks get shallower, cards matter more. As stacks get deeper, game dynamics and player tendencies matter more. Shallow When playing with short effective stacks (<50bb), you need to play hands that will make the best hand a lot of the time. If you are playing against people with larger stacks, you will have less fold equity, so you will ...


6

Shoving with a straight+flush draw is a pretty standard play for NLHE in my book. You typically have enough equity to be even money against your opponent's calling range. That means you could call their shove and see a profit due to the dead money in the pot. Almost any time that you could call and be even money, a shove is better, and the more money in the ...


6

1) Did you find my thought on flop reasonable of calling? Yes, absolutely. You should only tend to count backdoor outs as 1 out though. Giving yourself 3 extra outs for a backdoor flush draw is a little too generous. Apart from that your calculation was perfect. He gave you a great price to call and if you pair your King/Queen or hit your gutshot on the ...


5

I'd bet $55 on the flop, $130 on the turn. That said, if he is as aggressive as you state, has a wide a range as you perceive and doesn't like to let a betting opportunity go by then, given the vulnerability of your hand and it's likelihood to improve, check calling three streets (providing you don't spike a set) is a reasonable line IMO. A bare overpair ...


5

Typically, live play will mean you're seeing between 30-50 hands per hour. In your case, this will mean that you've seen somewhere in the region of 7,000 hands. This is an incredibly low number to make any significant, reliable assumptions about the StDev of your win-rate. The data set simply isn't large enough to be approaching what we'd consider a normal ...


5

The more players, the more money on the table. The rake is less noticed. Be aware that: The rake is increased together with the number of the hands. If you play HU and on the first hand you both go all-in, the rake will be minimum. If you play many hands, the total rake is increased (and of course, the amount of money is decreased). If you play in a full ...


5

There are quite a few things we need to address here. I'm going to do my best to break them down point-by-point. First off... AK is not favorite to win against so many players, is it really profitable in the long run? What should i look for in this 2 situations to decide if it's profitable on the long run? Should i consider play AQ as well in this ...


5

My suggestion based off my own personal experience with house games is start with small buy-in tournaments. As the experience and comfort level grows, you can then either. Up the buy-in of the tournaments and/or transition into cash games. You can set the Buy-in caps of the cash games to limit the loss and keep the games friendly. To keep players from ...


5

The only time you can consider folding AA preflop is: You are on the bubble in a tournament, and More than two players are all in, and one of them WILL bust, and Your stack is such that you could bust out if you call, and If you fold, you are guaranteed a place in the money. ALL of these things MUST be true to make folding AA the right decision. There ...


5

You characterize the villain as very tight so with that in mind, his range is narrow and rarely includes any bluffs, if any at all. I'm guessing you think the same. That said, I'd split his range into two parts, his core range and a secondary range. His core range is likely [AQx, KQx, QJx, KJs, KTs]. His secondary range is likely [JJ ,TT, 99]. If i'm ...


5

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


5

Judging from what you wrote in the question, I think you are misunderstanding a few concepts here. First, math is math. Math doesn't care if you play poker, running, feeding your dog or doing something else. Math's laws are universal. This means that the math will have the same precision both in the heat of the battle and after the session is over and you ...


4

Disclaimer: All of what follows applies only to winning players. For non-winning players, none of this matters a whit. I'm not going to discuss actual, hard numbers as most people familiar with StdDev in poker will declare something that can be interpreted as "StdDev is completely useless until you have 100k+ hands," -- a sentiment I disagree with in ...


4

Someone who never took insurance would do better in the long run than somebody who took insurance. Ultimately it's a subjective question since you are losing EV. Only you can answer if the juice is worth it to you to reduce variance. It's easy to construct hypothetical situations in which I would take insurance in real life, given a large enough pot. That ...


4

I would argue that both games take a similar amount of skill in order to achieve expert-level play. However, to achieve average-level play, tournaments require less skill. The reasoning behind this is, as John Dibling stated, cash games require more postflop play. That complication is forced into the game much more than any of the complications of ...


4

Since you didn't engage any money yet if you call you would do $2 but the minimum amount for a raise there is $4 since the $2 is from the max amount that was bet in the table and the next amount you can place is $2(max bet)+$2(BB). Answer:$4 Some casino's might have some rules and sometimes they aren't the same as in other casino's.


4

However I would say cash game is more complicated, that's not the point. The point is, they need different skill sets; in tournament play, you deal with a ton of preflop problems, which is far more easy to learn and doesn't need good logic at all. You just need a lot of work, knowing which stack size you can do what. This is all you need basically. (Sure ...



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