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7

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


5

Yes, you might be 80% against a random hand, but unless he really is just gambling on his last hand (how can you know?) his likely range will significantly lower your odds. For example: You're getting pot odds of 42%. Your card odds are around 18% if he's only ever shoving AA in this spot, around 23% if he's shoving AA or KK, and 50% if he's shoving AA, KK ...


5

Unless you think your opponent only ever does this move with AA, you're likely to be at least a 70-80% favourite to win the hand. Maybe not the bet to be making with your entire net worth, but with a portion of your poker bank on the table, I'd call this every time. Of course you're not going to win 100% of the time (and it hurts when you do lose - ...


5

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


4

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


4

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

This question is considered by way to many players as relevant to building a bankroll. What you are winning or losing in any particular session has nothing to do with your expectation. One is going to have rushes and bad runs. These things even out. What the important thing to keep in mind is that you want to play winning poker for as many hours as you can. ...


4

When you see such post-flop aggression from an opponent, you want to take a look on post-flop stats like AF and specifically in what frequency this guy bets in every street. The VPIP/PFR you posted doesn't really describe his play. Although the sample you have is small; ~60 hands are not that descriptive for the play made by Villain. Personally, and because ...


4

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


4

There are a lot of questions outstanding in this, but a couple of things jump out at me. It's a micro-limit play money game - people will play anything Your raise to 2x BB with multiple limpers is WAY too small. It's too small of a raise to be considered a raise, really, even in a big real-money cash game. The pot-odds almost dictate that the other ...


3

It seems quite plain to me that the sequence of events it crucial to resolving this situation. The fact that villains hands is mucked, and that a live hand is in play means Hero should be awarded the pot. It seems irrelevant to me that the Hero's four hole cards aren't all exposed. It also seems disingenuous that the game runner should award himself half ...


3

Really understand the maths* It's one thing to know that one out with two cards to come is around 4% to win, it's totally another to get your head around what that really means. Most people see that they're 96% to win and completely fail to consider that they can lose from this point. You need to be able to accept that losing is a perfectly valid outcome. ...


3

Just gonna throw my two cents in to make you think about some things (some people might have mention some of them already.) You haven't actually mentioned anything about positions here, what position are you and what position is villain? Position is one of the most important factors when explaining a hand as our range changes based on this. For example if ...


3

This is really just a comment on your turn play. Short version: After you check and he bets, I think you should have shoved all-in. You don't say exactly what the stacks were to begin the hand, but since you say they were greater than 100 bigs, I'm guessing they were closer to 100 than 200+. You called his pre-flop reraise and played the flop and turn quite ...


3

You have to call once. You have AA, in fact i would definitely called with QQ+ without history. Most players try this raise with a high J to state their hand, to slow-down the action on Turn/River and define their hand better by Villain's reply. Not necessarily the nemesis of AA, a set. In my opinion sets are betting/raising the Flop on particularly wet ...


3

One of the troubles with this hand is you can't narrow his range pre-flop. He's seeing a lot of flops anyway and since he's defending his blind his range will likely be even higher than normal. Pre-flop he can have almost any hand. FLOP He raises your strong looking 3/4 pot bet and you call. Since he is aggressive (from his pre-flop stats at least) it's a ...


3

First of all, it seems you were in a very trappy table. The lads had lots of VPIP and some traces of PFR, which mean you were in a calling, weak table rather than a value bet table. When i'm in such a table, and especially when the action ended in a limp, my first thought is that my opponent can have literally anything, except premium hands. You would ...


3

Given your description of villain, I think your play is OK but a call might be better. A flush draw is a huge part of his range here. The problem with raising him all in though is that he's getting a pretty good price to call with just a flush draw. If you were to call instead of raising, then the majority of turn cards would result in one of two ...


2

Action is the one word answer! Antes were common in all higher limit (5/10 and better) Seven Card Stud games, and variants like Eight or Better, and Razz. Very rare in Texas Hold'em games. I also believe that most higher limit five card draw games like lo-ball and jacks or better also commonly had antes. The downside to Antes are that they slow down the ...


2

The traditional rule is that if it is the apparent winner of the hand who asks to see the loser's hand, then the dealer may show the hand and it is live, that is, the player asks to see the hand at his own risk. If, say, a third or fourth player who called to the river asks to see the hand, then the dealer should pick up the hand, touch it to the muck to ...


2

Depends on where you play. 20 years ago a caller had the right to see any called hand was pretty much the standard rule in any poker room. This rule is changing in many locations. You don't necessarily have a right to see a hand, and a floor person must be called to make a ruling rather or not you can see the hand. You really need to ask what the rule is ...


2

I do not know if you call, I do know that you do not automatically fold. The majority of boards in hold'em like this have cards that are connected enough and suited enough for someone to hold a hand better then yours. What it really boils down to is the dynamics between you and the other player that will dictate rather or not you should call. Besides the ...


2

You think he's on a flush draw but he probably has a high Ax or a high pair. Even if you're 100% sure that he holds 2 hearts eg. 9♥8♥, the correct play is to bet/raise 50% (or more) of the pot on the Turn to give him at least 25% pot odds while he has about 20% card odds with 1 card to come to hit his hypothetical flush. You can try to bet ...


2

I'd call once, and then fold if the villain continues to bet. He probably has "trips," maybe jacks. To "protect" yourself, you need to develop a reputation of raising not only with AA, but with lower pairs. My guess is that with your reputation, if you raised with pairs down to T-T, most people would fold. Eventually if you get caught, then the villain ...


2

LIFE You might reconsider if it's worth taking 4 hours travel to go play poker. Unless you do it once a month or so. I'd tell you to find a better way to make money perhaps. Poker is a tyring, stressfull game. If you play too long and have to travel 2 hours to go and 2 hours to come back you might consider that one day you might get an accident because ...


2

The differences between online play money and online microstakes cash games are huge. IMO, the microstakes cash NLHE games are similar in nature to a typical $1-$2 NL game in a live poker room. There are some awful players and some that are clearly better than the others, ranging from nitty to loose-aggressive. Deposit a small amount of cash in an online ...


2

TL;DR: I think shoving was fine. After his flop raise he has only about a half the pot left in his stack. You're of course not folding to that raise given your read on him as a looser player who is likely to be playing diamonds this way, so calling or shoving are your two options. It's true that the villain has priced himself into the hand with that raise ...


2

My analysis is you played fine. If villain was on a flush draw you got pot odds to put him all in on the flop and you might have gotten him to fold. If you had waited for a blank on turn he might have gotten away. What I don't get is the $20 raise from villain. He is not getting pots odds on the $20. If he was trying to push you off the pot he should ...


2

I see villains stats, and I wonder how many hands were in the sample. Those seem to be short-term unsustainable maniac stats. Secondly, is this a cash game, SNG, MTT, HU, Spin & Go? And how early on in the session/at table? Thirdly, what are the actual stakes? You say micro but, 50NL or micro-micro like 2NL? At 50NL I cannot believe the stats are ...



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