Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

This will be pretty messy if I don't define some variables, so here goes: P$ = Current size of the pot S$ = Minimum of your stack vs your opponent's stack F% = Chance of your opponent folding to your shove (this should be between 0 and 1; divide percentages by 100 to get corresponding value) W% = Chance of you winning when called (this should be between 0 ...


9

When I tell my non-poker playing friends that I play poker they thing I'm gambling - until I give them the following explaination. Poker, played correctly, is not gambling in my opinion. And I think this is a good way to explain EV to non-poker players or new players. The idea in poker is to do two things - make correct decisions based on available ...


8

Probability: the chance of a particular outcome. More precisely, the probability of any given outcome is the ratio of all the favorable outcomes and every outcome that is possible. (so favorable / everything) The probability of throwing 6 with a dice is exactly 1/6 because all the sides are perfectly equal, there are 6 of them but only 1 is favorable in ...


8

The decision is based on the extra equity you gain in the tournament if you win. In the first instance, you have an 80% chance at a 600bb stack, and a 20% chance at not cashing. Your ROI with a 600bb stack would need to go up based on that stack to make the call worthwhile. The breakeven point is .8 * 300% * advantage + .2 * 300% * 0 = 300% The left side ...


5

If you know your post-flop equity, your cards are irrelevant to the calculation here. That said, we have one crucial bit of information that is lacking: what range of hands is your opponent reraising with preflop? If he reraises with 100% of his cards and then folds everything but AA/KK, then it's pretty easy to make this profitable. If he only ever ...


5

There are thumb rules for the preflop equity (against a single random opponent) of pocket pairs and suited-connected combos. For the equity of a pocket pair, you calculate how many cards away from 2 your cards are (for example, Queens are 10 cards away from 2), multiply by 3 and add 50%. So QQ's preflop equity is approximately: (10 * 3) + 50 = 80% For ...


4

Say we have a $1 million raffle that has only two tickets: a winner and a loser. I give you a random ticket and tell you that you MUST sell it. How much money should you sell it for? (I.e. how much is it worth?) A. $1 million? No, because it could just as easily be worth $0. B. $0? No, because it could just as easily be worth $1 million. C. $0.5 million? ...


4

Direct EV calculations are the first step in figuring out how to calculate "maximized EV" based on situational considerations. To become a better player, you will very much care about the size of your positive EV. Sure, the basic EV calculations say to either bet, call or fold based on card odds vs pot odds. Usually, you're only really looking for a ...


2

this page does a very good job of explaining variance and expected value http://www.thepokerbank.com/strategy/other/variance/


2

KQ offsuit apparently has about 48 - 50 % equity against that range (I calculated this using an equity calculator). So, given that the all-in was preflop, you essentially have a coin-flip. So it's very hard to determine if a call here would be +EV or -EV, especially because figuring out that range is always very hard. So the calculation of equity can (and ...


2

First of all it's important to explain that EV is a concept rooted in the law of large numbers, and which poker players use to calculate risk and reward. I'll get back to this concept. When calculating EV a poker player takes a few things into consideration: 1) The size of the pot 2) The probability of winning that pot 2) The size of the bet they're faced ...


2

If you have a simple 6 side dice you can arrange a simple demonstration. Tell your friends you'll give them 1$ in every throw if the result is 3-6, and they have to pay 1$ if it is 1-2. Tell them you're going to play 5 rounds and what they expect in terms of money won / lost. Then play the game and compare the results to their estimation. Intuitively they ...


2

Say that we decide to bet on coin flips. In the first case, I will give you $1 every time that it is heads, and you will give me $1 every time that it is tails. Simple logic will tell you that since 1/2 of the time I owe you $1 (heads) and the other 1/2 of the time you owe me $1 (tails) that if we flip the coin enough times, it will even out. In this ...


2

I don't think anything is proven, not even that ev_sb >= 0, so the only bounds we have are trivial: -0.5 <= ev_sb <= 1. An easier question is "What ev_sb do people find solving abstracted versions of HUNLHE". It would be be interesting to know the sorts of values people are getting, i.e. 1) The value of the (abstract) game from the SB's ...


2

When holding a pocket pair, you will hit a set one time in 8. That's 12%. Rough math at the table means that you can set-mine if you expect to make 10x your preflop call amount when the set comes (which is going to be a factor of bet-size, stack-size, and opponent tendencies).


1

You can get some tighter bounds by calculating the expected value of some specific strategy (call it S1), knowing that the GTO strategy will be >= S1. For instance let S1 be the strategy where the small blind goes all-in with AA, and folds all other hands. It is a pretty simple probability problem to calculate the expected values in that situation. There is ...


1

I think there is a problem with your definition of ev_sb; you've included a recursive definition that doesn't make sense to me. Also, your definition of r_ev has possibly complicated the problem definition. Instead of r_ev is the part of the initial pot of 1.5BB the sb wins when r I redefine r_ev to be the EV to the SB when SB open-limps or ...


1

The EV is (% he folds to All in * Current pot size) + (% of times opponent calls * % you will win * Total size of pot) - (% of times opponent calls * % you will lose * Amount that you bet/shove). On the left of the "+" sign are the times without a showdown. On the right are the times with a showdown. The times you win or lose can be calculated either ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible