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16

Yes, I burn cards at a friendly home game. Cards can become marked unintentionally. Further, failure to follow standard clean dealing procedures makes mistakes more likely, and even in friendly games, a mistake that costs someone a big pot can cause hard feelings.


11

In the case of an inexperienced player, I would give a longer adjustment period. I might start instituting more severe repercussions on the fourth instance. This player sounds like he knows what he is doing (based in part on the "the casinos let me do it" comment), and as such, I'm going to be less forgiving. I would likely implement said 'severe ...


6

Yes. It's important for consistency reasons. If one dealer does it and the next one does not, then you run into problems with people saying the wrong cards appeared on the board. It could be a house rule that you do not burn cards, but whatever is done needs to be done the same on every single hand.


6

According to my experience It depends.... If going all in three way handed and the loosing player has the low stack, the other two players split the bounty. If the loosing player has more chips than one of the other players, the bounty is not split and "goes" to the player with the high stack. I know you didn't ask but to complete the answer.. in split ...


5

Unless you're actually short of physical chips - 3 distinct values (1 / 5 / 25) should be plenty. It just gets too confusing otherwise.


5

Here are some considerations for denomination choice: If your supply of chips is limited, large denominations can be used similar to "cash plays". We like to minimize the average number of chips per denomination per bet. We like to maximize the number of possible bet sizes for denominations in use. We like to minimize the effort required to count bets. We ...


5

He mucked his cards, with his chips, then decided he 'changed his mind' and tried to pull back two cards. This was caught and his hand called dead. Well I would warn him the first time, maybe even a second but after that I would penalize him. A round of blinds is usually a good penalty. After a hand, he looked at another players hole cards that ...


4

I'll give a known ranking procedure and a handicapping example further down. Pokerstars awards the points to the top 15% of players in a tournament based on this calculation: Points = 10 * [sqrt(n)/sqrt(k)] * [1+log(b+0.25)] Where: n is the number of entrants k is the place of finish (k=1 for the first-place finisher, and so on) b is the buy-in ...


4

I am angered enough at the other two answers here to move my comments to an actual attempt at an answer. I think they really miss the point. In short: This behavior from the big blind is illegal collusion and deserving of a penalty. The intent of the BB here is obviously to signal to the SB that he is no threat in the hand. That's a big deal. This is a ...


4

There is no reason to deviate from standard procedure of burning a card before the flop, turn, and river when dealing with an all-in situation - it saves nothing and can only cause confusion. Running it twice isn't really part of any official poker rules, so it will always follow the house rule. I would prefer that known cards not be reshuffled between - if ...


3

I think that with requirements so specific, you won't find any existing software that can fullfill them. You might have to write the software yourself or have someone else write it for you. I don't want to get into the subject of software development (there are other StackExchange sites for that), but at a first glance creating something like this shouldn't ...


3

Bluff very little and play stonger starting hands than your opponents. Don't push weak draws - you want big wraps if you are betting. If they have poor betsizing, draw to the nuts for cheap - don't semi-bluff. It sounds like these people will be very easy to value bet, and very difficult to bluff. Pump up the pot when you are likely to have the best of ...


3

From my experience, the biggest chip should be 10 times the big blind. Especially if the maximal buy in is limited to somewhere around 100 times the big blind. In this case I believe you should use 1$, 2$, 5$, 10$, 20$ chips. although 20$ chips are relatively big, they can be used as psychological "tool" to put more pressure on the other players.


2

In this case, I think the chips with value 1 and 2 should be more than 60 - 70 % of all chips. You use them the most, the ones with 20 and 50 are rarely used.


2

IMHO there is a difference between etiquette, house rules and gamesmanship. I've yet see a house game, casino game or big tournament that has a rule against what the BB said. However, they might. But that would be a silly rule, IMHO. You are usually not allowed to talk about the exact cards in your hand, in the same sense that you shouldn't turn your ...


2

Burning a card is good practice: It if there is a mark on the back of the card rather intentional or not it protects that mark from being known and exploited. The top card on the deck is more prone to being shown inadvertently then the one right below it. Its is much more common to accidentally expose the top card then the card second from the top. It is ...


1

I don't speak for cash games. At home with my kids, it is pointless to play for money so I decided to choose the denominations {1,2,5,10,25} and for every game each player has 100 total. The total of 100 would correlate to 100% of one's total assets. Although, I am not yet so sure that 100 can manage well the surge of variance when one is using optimum ...


1

The answer depends on the "house rules". However I would suggest in general: if you are not in the hand, then you should not talk about the hand or what you folded or think someone has you must not collaborate with anyone. You can't make deals with people or help them you should not indicate what you are going to do until it is your turn to act Having ...


1

The problem is that you can't teach someone a subject matter if they're not really interested in it. Poker is a great game, but unless the student wants to learn, they're not going to. Imagine you showed up at one of these get-togethers, and one of your friends said, "Hey, let me teach you Chess. It's an awesome game, but it's complicated. You'll love it." ...


1

The most important thing is that you should be aware of the fact that you cannot teach poker to someone who doesn't like the game. Yes, it's a great game and yes, I enjoy it very much. But, as much as it hurts, it doesn't mean that my friends should like it too. Judging by what I read, they don't seem to like it that much. So, before everything, make sure ...


1

I'm in exactly the same situation, down to every cruel aspect of it. It's actually quite amazing, something that people without knowledge of probability distributions would call a huge coincidence :D . I think the problem in your approach is the fact that you throw a huge amount of information at them. Texas Hold'em (and poker in general) is a game with a ...


1

Access to the SMS API is fairly restricted on phones. iOS as of 5.0 started allowing limited access but still doesn't allow reading incoming SMSes (privacy concerns) or automatic SMS broadcast from within an app (spam concerns). I believe Android and other smart phones will have similar restrictions for the same reasons. Any other kind of app will need to ...


1

Burning cards is part of the game rules for all Hold'em poker variants (Texas Hold'em, Omaha, Omaha 8 etc.). I think the game rules should be applied as they are no matter where the game is played. I've seen many bitter situations caused by bending or changing of the rules. Even changes made with good intentions can cause undesirable situations.


1

It seems you are playing against loose players, so don't bluff - you will get called anyway. According to what you wrote, it seems that many players bet to see the flop - in this case I would have joined them (many players in the flop means bigger pot - improve your pot odds); If you miss the flop, fold to any bet. Of course, you should pay attention to the ...


1

I have seen this happen and the rule that was applied was the bounty went to the player with the most chips a the start of the hand.


1

I would try to distinguish between what's accidental and intentional. "Mixing up" chips might be accidental, and deserve a few warnings. But looking at mucked cards or taking back folds are intentional. Such actions deserve AT MOST one warning, after which penalties (or "barring") should apply.


1

It's not a big deal in what you describe. Depends on the home game. Some home games are very serious and involve significant stakes. Other home games are entirely casual/social occasions and involve low stakes. So, you'll probably need to burn cards in the "serious" games; in the casual/social games, I wouldn't worry about it very much. That being ...


1

I think your system is good when is separating good players from weaker players, then in other scale separate good players from totally weak players. From comments i see you have payouts and motivation issues to good weaker players, is good to see that in ranking i think you should change your payout system (after 6 months) because in that is problem not in ...


1

Play a stronger range than your opponents. If they are consistently getting the money in with low equity the only really good way to profit is to have a stronger range than your opponents when the bigger pots are being played. Preflop hand selection revolves around picking hands that will flop a good high and a good low draw and go from there.



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