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9

When I tell my non-poker playing friends that I play poker they thing I'm gambling - until I give them the following explaination. Poker, played correctly, is not gambling in my opinion. And I think this is a good way to explain EV to non-poker players or new players. The idea in poker is to do two things - make correct decisions based on available ...


4

Say we have a $1 million raffle that has only two tickets: a winner and a loser. I give you a random ticket and tell you that you MUST sell it. How much money should you sell it for? (I.e. how much is it worth?) A. $1 million? No, because it could just as easily be worth $0. B. $0? No, because it could just as easily be worth $1 million. C. $0.5 million? ...


3

Definitely yes, its worth it. For example: you play MTTs, in the middle of tournament, and you've got a decent stack of chips (not short stacked). Blinds are going high, and a lot of short stacked players will start going all in. And that's where poker math comes into play. Its the best time to increase your stack by doing some calls, if odds / pot odds are ...


3

Advantage is to be "on the button" -- the player furthest from the action. That is, with each cycle around the table, the blinds are first to act and the button is last. This is highly advantageous because the person last to act has seen a suggestion of each other player's interest in the pot (subject, of course, to bluffing and slow play). Blind raising is ...


2

If you have a simple 6 side dice you can arrange a simple demonstration. Tell your friends you'll give them 1$ in every throw if the result is 3-6, and they have to pay 1$ if it is 1-2. Tell them you're going to play 5 rounds and what they expect in terms of money won / lost. Then play the game and compare the results to their estimation. Intuitively they ...


2

TwoPlusTwo poker forums. Nothing else. I highly recommend the following collection of forum posts / articles. These are the finest writings about the basics and more advanced concepts of the game, these will put you lightyears ahead of micro / small stakes competition. I remember when i first came by this around 2008, I got so hooked :) Have fun! ...


2

this page does a very good job of explaining variance and expected value http://www.thepokerbank.com/strategy/other/variance/


2

First of all it's important to explain that EV is a concept rooted in the law of large numbers, and which poker players use to calculate risk and reward. I'll get back to this concept. When calculating EV a poker player takes a few things into consideration: 1) The size of the pot 2) The probability of winning that pot 2) The size of the bet they're faced ...


2

Knowing poker math has helped me bet (and win) the occasional hand by understanding pot odds. That made it "worth it" for me. More to the point, it's worth it for someone who plays "occasionally" or more.


2

IMHO, even if you manage to calculate your odds perfectly well, in every hand, if you are sit in a 9 players table, you'd win the pot 1/9 time (in a purely probabilistic way). Now, just try to imagine if your hands are weak before the flop (or turn/river) and someone, for any reason, breaks the odd every hand you play, because he saw you were playing that ...


2

In the big scheme of things at the poker table there are upsides and downsides to math, as well as with intuitive play. For the sack of clarity, generally speaking intuitive play is doing what you feel is right, and mathematical play is what you figure out is right based on a range of factors. Neither is a strategy, they are how you approach the game. The ...


2

Of course it's worth it. Playing profitable poker comes down to two fundamental principles: Identify your opponent's strategy. Compute, and implement, the best response. You're falling prey to a common misconception about poker. Too many players try to justify only focusing on principle #1 because it's far easier and more intuitive than putting in hard ...


1

Beyond the basic math of pot odds and hand odds, you should also understand what kind of percentages you should be calling/raising/folding in different situations simply to prevent others from exploiting you. For example, if you are folding more than X % in a certain spot, it can make it profitable for opponents to play any 2 cards against you and make a ...


1

I don't recommend not using money, learn how to play the basics from books. then set yourself a spending limit IE £20, deposit that into a good site and play. trying to lose as little as you can out of maximum hands, without playing too tight. When you're not using money you don't make decisions that you would do realistically and it doesn't feel right. ...


1

If it's just about not loosing money, you should try Play Chips on PokerStars. Once you manage to build up a nice stack of play chips and hold on to it, you should also be able to do the same at the pennypoker that PokerStars offer. There are as of yet no robots that play any kind of proper No Limit Holdem. The only thing you could learn from playing ...


1

I have bought and am utilizing Poker Genius (www.poker-genius.com) to learn Texas Hold’em. As a successful Blackjack card counter for 25 years I know the value of meaningful practice and Poker Genius training software is the best I have found. Not only can I play realistic games from a technical standpoint, but I can play against a variety of life-like ...


1

If you can learn patience and the ability to fold small hands to postflop raises then you will be far ahead of most microstakes players when you decide to play for real money.


1

For cash games, when you feel you are by far the best player at the table, you can start playing for real money. Repeat this step on real money tables as well. What I think is interesting are the freeroll tournaments. I really learned a lot by doing this. You will learn playing in position, playing with your stacksize, adapting to new blind levels and so ...



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