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22

Even though seeking to completely control one's tells is a good goal to aim for, it may be a good idea not to give them a chance of happening. One way of accomplishing this, noted in Phil Gordon's Little Green Book, is not to look at your cards until it is your turn to act (before the Flop in Texas Hold'em). Or, to state it in a more general way: The less ...


19

When faced with these situations in my home games, we begin to institute a penalty of some sort for any recurring violations. I think that works for both serious and friendly games - it may simply alter what penalty you choose. Examples we have followed: Folding of their hand (and either negating any bet they made on the current street or forfeiting that ...


14

It's the Host's responsibility to educate the players and warn them of the rules they need to follow. If the game is too rules focused, it can kill a good evening. Like you said, most times explaining to the player (especially if they are new) the rules and upcoming repercussions, is the best thing to do. If they fail to listen, then start beating them ...


11

In addition to codesparkle's great advice, I think the other key thing (as noted in Joe Navarro's Read 'Em and Reap) is to replace your tells with routine. Have a set (and comfortable) base position that you return to every time, likely with your elbows on the table, hands covering your mouth. Consciously strive to make your actions (looking at cards, ...


11

I think the only realistic options for villain are a missed draw or Tx. I think he'd have gotten more aggressive earlier if he had you preflop. Your line looks a lot like an overpair to me, and as such, he would want to get value out of you if he had trips or a full house. As such, I don't think he shoves the river here if he wanted a call. He knows you ...


10

My standard raise in this spot preflop would be something like $84. With reads that villains are bad (i.e. will call 3bets like this way too often) that number becomes bigger. So $110 probably isn't a bad raise size, but you should realize that you're putting in 1/3 of effective stacks and you really don't want to play postflop when that's the case. Under ...


9

You can fold at any point in poker, that is legitimate play. Even if it was his turn to show first he could fold and sacrifice his chance of the pot (although it would be stupid to do so). To fold at this point is in fact good play, if you know you can't win then you should give your opponents less information about how you bet.


8

First, a look at ranges: I think he has AA/KK/Tx/88/33 here no more often than he has JJ or a busted draw (to the straight or the flush). And sometimes he'll turn up with utter crap. So if we say it's an even money bet, we're getting good odds on a call. Second, let's look at history: You noted in the comments that Villian has not let a pot check around. ...


8

I'm iffy about your flop bet-size. There are not many hands that you are worse than even-money with on that board. Represent the strength that you have so that your decisions later in the hand are easier. A half pot bet looks like you are just c-betting to c-bet. Honestly, I prefer either a larger bet to maintain control of the hand, or a similar bet to ...


8

Live poker tends to be significantly different than online. Rules Always protect your cards. That doesn't mean don't let someone grab them and run, it means cover your cards with something. Use one of your poker chips. If you don't, and are in the seats close the dealer, the dealer will rarely, accidentally muck your hand. This isn't their fault. It's ...


7

It is very important when explaining rules that you explain why the rules exist. For example, holding your cards below the table can lead to out-of-order play, which can actually be quite unfair to the other players, who either get information they wouldn't have had normally--in which case it is unfair to everyone else--or who unwittingly may reveal ...


7

First, $110 is too much. $70 (~6 times more than the initial raise) would be enough here to make other players fold their hands (obviously, they are trying to catch something with Axs, small connectors, small pairs, etc. - it's hard to call 3bet for them here). KK is a good hand but it seems like hero is so afraid of losing with this hand, so he can't play ...


6

Your best source of information will be the casinos themselves. Most casinos have web sites, and many of those include tournament schedules for their poker rooms. Otherwise, you can call them, and they can tell you of any upcoming events. Ante Up Magazine's web site has an index of poker rooms by state that could be of use in your search for nearby ...


6

The rules vary from casino to casino. But Generally: The last person to bet has to show first and then it goes clockwise from him or her. You are allowed to muck if someone shows a winning hand. However, a lot of casinos will show your mucked cards if the other player asks to see them after all the action is done. When I say mucked cards I mean cards ...


6

It's challenging to accomplish, but taking a long view of poker is a good way to hide tells. If you don't let yourself get caught up in wishing for a specific outcome or action, then you are less likely to show nerves or excitement/disappointment. Dissociate your thoughts from the money and approach each situation as you would if the situation were posed as ...


6

If you think you have the best hand then going all-in is about the only move that's left as a sensible option. That said, for us to be ahead, villain would have to have J7x, J8x, 87x (Two pairs); J9x, T8x, T9x, T7x (Pair+Gutshots); 96x, 65x (Open Ended Straight Draws); AJx (TPTK, although I doubt he'd be this aggressive?!). Otherwise, we're behind JJ, 88, ...


6

I think all-in is definitely the best move here in a cash game, where the hero is most surely ahead. The villain, being in dealer position, would most likely have raised with QQ or 99 pre-flop. Without knowing about your table image, the villain could have been playing Q-x, 10dJd, or could have 2 pair. So of the likely holdings for the villian there are ...


6

Obviously the flop here is terrible for the hero. The hero is behind A-x, JJ, KQ, 10-10. Villain raised under the gun making AK, AQ or high pockets the likely holdings. An all-in bet will likely immediately chase away 9-9 pockets and below, leaving the likely holdings of AK,AQ, AA, QQ, JJ , 10-10 remaining. I excluded KK, since this holding is very ...


6

You do not ever have to count or tell you opponent your stack size. You will have to move your hands/arms out of the way so that your opponent can see your stack size, though. It's the dealer's job to tell your opponent how many chips you have if your opponent asks.


6

I would suggest you play some online freerolls to get the feel for online poker. If you can deposit (not sure based on the US rules) then I would deposit as much as you are comfortable losing. Dont deposit $200 if you can only really afford $75 for example. Then you need to stick to some strict Bankroll Management. With regards to books, there are hundreds ...


6

For me it is not about body language when an opponent looks at his cards. I'm doing a few things when I'm waiting for my turn. Monitoring the players to act after me. There are players that will give away whether or not they want to play their hand or not before it gets to them. This has an effect of strengthening your position. If you are in mid position ...


5

Typically, live play will mean you're seeing between 30-50 hands per hour. In your case, this will mean that you've seen somewhere in the region of 7,000 hands. This is an incredibly low number to make any significant, reliable assumptions about the StDev of your win-rate. The data set simply isn't large enough to be approaching what we'd consider a normal ...


5

Limping AJs on the button was probably a mistake (raise), tiny raise with top 2 in a tiny pot was probably a mistake (raise bigger), and calling the all-in is pretty easy in this spot. Against the tightest range we can assign villain in this spot, you are a favorite: Board: Ad Js 2c equity win tie pots won pots tied Hand 0: ...


5

Given the range of hands you are assigning him, I don't think you can profitably call preflop. You should probably fold, or possibly 3bet if you think he will make the mistake of folding too much (either immediately or to a flop continuation bet). But I think folding is the best play, exploiting the fact that he is too tight with his open raises. As ...


5

I tend to raise this spot preflop but if the guys behind you and in the blinds are passive limping behind can be ok. The flop raise is a tad big, but standard, and yes, call the shove. His shove is pretty large and if anything that's indicative of a big draw like A⋄K⋄ or J⋄T⋄. Sure he'll show up with better sets sometimes ...


5

I think the biggest mistake here is not raising pre-flop. With three people in the hand and AQ out of position I think this has to be a raise, relating to some comments that I read I would be raising here 100% of the time, I don't think playing AQ out of position is great (obviously you play it, it's a monster) and so narrowing the field would be the first ...


5

This is a little tricky. A non-verbal check is generally defined as "knocking or taping the table." So a single hit on the table with a fist does generally qualify as a check. Checking in the dark is a completely legal move. And since the bettor would have been next to act after the card is dealt, the non-verbal check motion might qualify as a check in ...


4

Tom is right. And if Alice really wanted to see Bobs hand, she shouldn't have showed her hand first. Try to fish it out of him is best, and if this doesn't work, Alice won the pot and that is what poker is all about! winning pots! :)


4

The reason we need opponent tendencies here is to come up with an accurate preflop range to call a 3 bet with. I would default it to JJ+, AQs+, AKo. You are behind AA, possibly with a redraw to a flush if he doesn't have the A♠, behind QQ with a redraw, and you have the rest crushed. His AK and AQ hands can't be flushes yet. Adding AsJs strengthens his ...


4

Don't talk during hands. The less you communicate, the less you risk giving away. Don't try to stare down an opponent. A lot is revealed in your eyes. I like to look at a spot on the table in front of me if I am being scrutinized by an opponent. Take your time. Especially when you've already made up your mind. Make it a habit to count to 10 slowly inside ...



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