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5

You did not play the pot correctly, you managed to lose the maximum amount possible. Your pre-flop raise was OK. With queens I would much rather have two aces hit the board then one, but that only means my hand is a little less likely to be beat at this point because there is one less ace in someone's hand. It does not mean anything other then that, you ...


5

Unless you think your opponent only ever does this move with AA, you're likely to be at least a 70-80% favourite to win the hand. Maybe not the bet to be making with your entire net worth, but with a portion of your poker bank on the table, I'd call this every time. Of course you're not going to win 100% of the time (and it hurts when you do lose - ...


5

Yes, you might be 80% against a random hand, but unless he really is just gambling on his last hand (how can you know?) his likely range will significantly lower your odds. For example: You're getting pot odds of 42%. Your card odds are around 18% if he's only ever shoving AA in this spot, around 23% if he's shoving AA or KK, and 50% if he's shoving AA, KK ...


4

The best way to beat this kind of player is tight-aggressive. you're not going to outplay this one, you're not going to bluff them, and you're certainly not going to be able to control them. All you can do is beat them. But it requires very disciplined uncreative play. You let them self destruct right into your stack. This kind of player is going to raise ...


4

The only way to lose with a King high straight flush is to a royal flush of the same suit. That means that the KQJT must all be community cards. The last community card is either the 9 or you have it as a pocket card. Case 1: 9 is on the board. The odds of this are the same as getting dealt a royal flush in 5 card stud: 20/52 * 4/51 * 3/50 * 2/49 * 1/48 ...


4

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


4

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


4

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


4

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


4

When you see such post-flop aggression from an opponent, you want to take a look on post-flop stats like AF and specifically in what frequency this guy bets in every street. The VPIP/PFR you posted doesn't really describe his play. Although the sample you have is small; ~60 hands are not that descriptive for the play made by Villain. Personally, and because ...


3

First of all, it seems you were in a very trappy table. The lads had lots of VPIP and some traces of PFR, which mean you were in a calling, weak table rather than a value bet table. When i'm in such a table, and especially when the action ended in a limp, my first thought is that my opponent can have literally anything, except premium hands. You would ...


3

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


3

If on the button and nobody has called, try to steal the blinds, if in early and middle position and nobody has raised limp. If in early middle position and somebody raised fold. If in the blinds and somebody is raising very late or on the button, make a call. If somebody raises in early to middle position, this hand is a fold. Raising this hand in early ...


3

You state you don't have much motivation playing micro stakes. I understand from your statement that what motivates you is the money gains. They are indeed low at micro stakes. And every poker player would be happy to rank 1st at a tourney with a million dollar gain. But what should motivate you is the game itself. If you see the game as a part time time ...


3

This depends on several factors... what's customary for the table, blind/ante sizes relative to stack sizes, who you are targeting with your raises. Early on, you can expect to get more loose calls when the blinds are low, so you'll have to raise a higher amount if you expect it to induce a fold -- maybe 3-4x if you're opening, and higher if others have ...


3

Regarding the issue with the ante: yes, the dealer will give you back a chip of 500. (S)he will take it either from the current pot or ask another player to make the exchange. But only put the 1000 chip in if you don't have anything smaller to pay for the ante. As long as you have the required chip denominations, use them. As for exchanging chips: yes, ...


3

UTG+1 must still min raise to 200 as the blind (100) is still the bet. Again, UTG has not met the min raise so you can still bet to 200. UTG+1 must raise to 340 as the last raise was of 120 (100 to 220) UTG+1 makes a min raise from 100 to 200 (raise size=100), UTG+2 must then at least match the last raise size and make it 300. If there was an all in from ...


3

One of the troubles with this hand is you can't narrow his range pre-flop. He's seeing a lot of flops anyway and since he's defending his blind his range will likely be even higher than normal. Pre-flop he can have almost any hand. FLOP He raises your strong looking 3/4 pot bet and you call. Since he is aggressive (from his pre-flop stats at least) it's a ...


3

You have to call once. You have AA, in fact i would definitely called with QQ+ without history. Most players try this raise with a high J to state their hand, to slow-down the action on Turn/River and define their hand better by Villain's reply. Not necessarily the nemesis of AA, a set. In my opinion sets are betting/raising the Flop on particularly wet ...


3

If he had only 12bb then he had a small, pushing M of 5 (M = stack / blinds + antes) and he was in Red Zone as described in Harrington's zone system. He was in a prime shoving situation since everyone folded before him, his cards consists in vast majority of high cards and any ace. The fact he shoved from hijack means he had even more lower requirements ...


3

This is really just a comment on your turn play. Short version: After you check and he bets, I think you should have shoved all-in. You don't say exactly what the stacks were to begin the hand, but since you say they were greater than 100 bigs, I'm guessing they were closer to 100 than 200+. You called his pre-flop reraise and played the flop and turn quite ...


3

Just gonna throw my two cents in to make you think about some things (some people might have mention some of them already.) You haven't actually mentioned anything about positions here, what position are you and what position is villain? Position is one of the most important factors when explaining a hand as our range changes based on this. For example if ...


2

The player at your table is an idiot, obviously. Under his theory player B that raised the $500 bet to $1000 with 2 $500 chips should not have been allowed either since by removing one of his $500 chips wouldn't constitute a legal raise. He is completely misinterpreting the rule. The rule is simple. If you are facing a bet and throw in multiple chips, it is ...


2

I think the player at your table was misinterpreting the rule. This is a raise. Rule 43 states: a multiple-chip bet is a call if there is not one chip that can be removed and still leave at least the call amount. To me, this says that in order for it to be considered a call, there cannot exist a situation where one chip is removed and the resulting ...


2

IMHO, even if you manage to calculate your odds perfectly well, in every hand, if you are sit in a 9 players table, you'd win the pot 1/9 time (in a purely probabilistic way). Now, just try to imagine if your hands are weak before the flop (or turn/river) and someone, for any reason, breaks the odd every hand you play, because he saw you were playing that ...


2

I think your question is an important one because antes is where I definitely see the most mistakes being made in a tournament. Your thinking is along the right lines. I'm assuming your tournament will have some sort of clock available; that clock should show you the antes and blinds. This clock is your friend, always make sure you know where you're at in ...


2

Each table tends to have it's own emergent raising pattern. In my experience the amount of the raise depends on what the table considers "normal" - like a 3x raise - and how loose the table is. If you want to get an "effective" raise - one that will cause weak (or weaker) hands to fold - you need to find the raise amount that will get people's attention. ...


2

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


2

The more you get into the game, the more aggressive it gets so this is something you'll need to get used to if you want to progress. I'd recommend finding out if they're loose or passive aggressive first before trying to pick them off. To get a handle on this, you'll need to see a few of their showdowns. If they're playing the occasional wild hand then ...


2

This is one of the cases where you need to raise strongly the limpers before you. The error on your side was that you raised the typical amount of only 3BBs. In your situation you have to raise much more. How more? Take a look: You have QQ, a very strong hand, yet a vulnerable holding if A or K flops. Your first thought is to open raise typically at 3BBs. ...



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