Hot answers tagged

7

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


5

Ok. Let's take this one step at a time. You describe your opponent as a "maniac". However, that player displays no "maniac" behavior in this hand, so I'm not sure where to go with that. I'd like more information on how you get that read on the player. But we can still analyze the hand. So you wake up with A4os in middle position and decide to raise 6x ...


5

Yes, you might be 80% against a random hand, but unless he really is just gambling on his last hand (how can you know?) his likely range will significantly lower your odds. For example: You're getting pot odds of 42%. Your card odds are around 18% if he's only ever shoving AA in this spot, around 23% if he's shoving AA or KK, and 50% if he's shoving AA, KK ...


5

Unless you think your opponent only ever does this move with AA, you're likely to be at least a 70-80% favourite to win the hand. Maybe not the bet to be making with your entire net worth, but with a portion of your poker bank on the table, I'd call this every time. Of course you're not going to win 100% of the time (and it hurts when you do lose - ...


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


5

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


4

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

When you see such post-flop aggression from an opponent, you want to take a look on post-flop stats like AF and specifically in what frequency this guy bets in every street. The VPIP/PFR you posted doesn't really describe his play. Although the sample you have is small; ~60 hands are not that descriptive for the play made by Villain. Personally, and because ...


4

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


4

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


4

No matter the subsequent actions of player 1, as soon as player 2 folds, player 1 should be awarded the side pot, even if his cards are never seen by anyone. Player 3 should never, ever be awarded the side pot, since he didn't have enough money in the pot to earn that from the other players. He was all in for less than the others had, so he should never be ...


4

My initial reaction when reading this hand was that a push was the easy play. After thinking about it a little, I'm not sure that it's so clear. Make no mistake, a push is absolutely a good, profitable play, but maybe just calling is better for the following reason: given his range, (which btw, I think is too tight--you shouldn't ever totally discount ...


3

I ran a simulation of around 5K hands and i found the following: 88 vs A9s (84% to win) Four of a Kind, won 128 times (3%) Full House, won 999 times (20%) <--- Three of a Kind, won 3113 times (62%) 88 vs KJs (82% to win) Four of a Kind, won 116 times (2%) Full House, won 900 times (18%) <--- Three of a Kind, won 3125 times (63%) I ...


3

If he had only 12bb then he had a small, pushing M of 5 (M = stack / blinds + antes) and he was in Red Zone as described in Harrington's zone system. He was in a prime shoving situation since everyone folded before him, his cards consists in vast majority of high cards and any ace. The fact he shoved from hijack means he had even more lower requirements ...


3

Just gonna throw my two cents in to make you think about some things (some people might have mention some of them already.) You haven't actually mentioned anything about positions here, what position are you and what position is villain? Position is one of the most important factors when explaining a hand as our range changes based on this. For example if ...


3

This is really just a comment on your turn play. Short version: After you check and he bets, I think you should have shoved all-in. You don't say exactly what the stacks were to begin the hand, but since you say they were greater than 100 bigs, I'm guessing they were closer to 100 than 200+. You called his pre-flop reraise and played the flop and turn quite ...


3

UTG+1 must still min raise to 200 as the blind (100) is still the bet. Again, UTG has not met the min raise so you can still bet to 200. UTG+1 must raise to 340 as the last raise was of 120 (100 to 220) UTG+1 makes a min raise from 100 to 200 (raise size=100), UTG+2 must then at least match the last raise size and make it 300. If there was an all in from ...


3

One of the troubles with this hand is you can't narrow his range pre-flop. He's seeing a lot of flops anyway and since he's defending his blind his range will likely be even higher than normal. Pre-flop he can have almost any hand. FLOP He raises your strong looking 3/4 pot bet and you call. Since he is aggressive (from his pre-flop stats at least) it's a ...


3

You have to call once. You have AA, in fact i would definitely called with QQ+ without history. Most players try this raise with a high J to state their hand, to slow-down the action on Turn/River and define their hand better by Villain's reply. Not necessarily the nemesis of AA, a set. In my opinion sets are betting/raising the Flop on particularly wet ...


3

First of all, it seems you were in a very trappy table. The lads had lots of VPIP and some traces of PFR, which mean you were in a calling, weak table rather than a value bet table. When i'm in such a table, and especially when the action ended in a limp, my first thought is that my opponent can have literally anything, except premium hands. You would ...


2

I do not know if you call, I do know that you do not automatically fold. The majority of boards in hold'em like this have cards that are connected enough and suited enough for someone to hold a hand better then yours. What it really boils down to is the dynamics between you and the other player that will dictate rather or not you should call. Besides the ...


2

You think he's on a flush draw but he probably has a high Ax or a high pair. Even if you're 100% sure that he holds 2 hearts eg. 9♥8♥, the correct play is to bet/raise 50% (or more) of the pot on the Turn to give him at least 25% pot odds while he has about 20% card odds with 1 card to come to hit his hypothetical flush. You can try to bet ...


2

Your thinking is good, although with a hand this strong as QQ and no history you definitely want to push more preflop and probably got it in. QQ has the most value before the flop so make him buy the full value. This also eliminates the positional advantage as well. Sure, he may have AA, KK but what could you do? Personally, i don't like to pay 11 BB (or ...


2

I think you played this too aggressively after the flop. When he calls your pre-flop raise out of position and then calls your pot-sized flop raise, what is he representing? Not many of those hands are hands that you can beat. 44, 77, TT+, AcXc, AT, and maybe a few other tens if he's really loose. You're a huge underdog to that range on this flop. The ...


2

I've found this in the wsop tournament rules: Exposing Cards and Proper Folding: A participant exposing his or her cards with action pending will incur a penalty, but will not have a dead hand. The penalty will begin at the end of the hand. All participants at the table are entitled to see the exposed card(s). When folding, cards should be pushed ...


2

I'd call once, and then fold if the villain continues to bet. He probably has "trips," maybe jacks. To "protect" yourself, you need to develop a reputation of raising not only with AA, but with lower pairs. My guess is that with your reputation, if you raised with pairs down to T-T, most people would fold. Eventually if you get caught, then the villain ...


2

I see villains stats, and I wonder how many hands were in the sample. Those seem to be short-term unsustainable maniac stats. Secondly, is this a cash game, SNG, MTT, HU, Spin & Go? And how early on in the session/at table? Thirdly, what are the actual stakes? You say micro but, 50NL or micro-micro like 2NL? At 50NL I cannot believe the stats are ...


1

I think your mistake was on the flop. There's a decent chance that you have the best hand after the flop, but it's important to consider how the rest of the hand is going to play out. Given that HJ has called a preflop raise and bet into you on the flop, there's a good chance he'll call the raise--the only time he folds is when you're way ahead, and do you ...


1

If you're playing a tournament i think going all in preflop is kinda bad after the player raises 11 bb. You're almost 100 BB deep you can play more cautiously in MTT. No need to risk a coin flip or bad moment with QQ, unless you are playing a fast pace game (turbo <= 5min). But still deciding on going all in would look too suspicious. In cash game going ...


1

It depends on how much you think this player is capable of running bluffs. If the player is totally incapable of bluffing, it's fine to fold on the flop. However, against a normal player they will have semibluffs in their range at a minimum. Against super nits - fold Against average players who can semibluff - call once and re-evaluate on the turn and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible