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You are not going to prevent losing to the set. But you could prevent losing your stack to the set. preflop preflop mid just called so AJo is probably ahead or a coin flip to low pair AQ or better would have raised you bet 60 - raised 40 into 1 $50 pot so you are giving 110:40 pot odds = 2.75 : 1 that is going to chase off blanks in the blinds it is ...


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You raised too small preflop, giving around 25% pot odds to a low pair to call you. He just have to call 40 more for a pot of 110 while he already limped 20, he's not going to fold, especially with a low pair. On flop you should have C-bet to find where you're of at least around 60%. Since you checked, he realized he's not going to get more money in the ...


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I think you should be raising more here pre-flop, with that said I wouldn't say it's necessarily bad. Villain can't really fold, with what is likely in their early position limping range, for 40 more with 110 in the pot. Very much depends on your style, but I'd probably bet about 80/90 here. I would have bet the flop too. Depending on what the villain does ...


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The winner is always the best 5-card hand. So, in the case of a Full House, it goes by the 3-of-a-kind first, then the pair. 444AA vs.88844 888 is higher than 444, so ‘88844’ is the high hand here. The only time the pair matters is if both players have the same 3-of-a-kind. For example: 444AA vs. 44488 (444 is on the board, Player 1 has pocket AA, Player 8 ...


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The winner is the player with the highest trips, so 88844 is the winning hand. If you use the search term "Full House" then you should find a few more decent examples here to explain the concept. Also, check out the "five card rule" for a definitive overview of Texas Hold Em hand rankings.



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