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11

This is a tiny little chart I made for a few friends who are very new to the game and often can't get their head around how much of a difference one or two pips can make! Reading the chart: If your hand is unsuited, match your hole cards in the lower left half of the table. If your hand is suited, match your hole cards in the upper right half of the ...


8

Yes, as I understand. Player 2 can either call the amount of the big blind or if they make a raise, they will have to raise to the smallest allowable amount. In this case that would be the twice the size of the big blind (4000).


8

This shouldn't even be a debate/question. It's a standard jam. There's nothing else to do here. Your hand is too strong, there are too many missed draws, and so on. You're truly, 100% overthinking this. You have a monster. Get it in. If Villian has a set or weird two-pair, rebuy and move on to the next hand. I've seen too many posts like this. I might be ...


7

It depends! What are your definitions of "conservatively" and "good hand" and "couple of chips"? And how long had you been playing at this game, allowing your opponents to develop an impression of your play? First, you can't make any generalizations based on this single hand. The fact that you got dealt AA doesn't entitle you to win a big pot. It could ...


5

Although physically the dealer is in place, the symbolic dealer is one of the players. They don't deal the cards but they have a "button" in front of them, indicating they are the dealer (and the blinds are the players to the button's left). After each hand, the (actual) dealer has the responsibility of moving the button to the next player. Often the ...


5

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old poker adage: "You ...


4

I have something that I call the Q-T-8 standard. Among starting hands, no unsuited hands where the lower card is lower than a Q (that is A-Q and K-Q only), no suited hands where the lower card is less than a ten (that is down to J-T), and no pairs lower than 8s.


4

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...


4

I think that you mucked. Now, that doesn't matter. I think calling the min-raise on the flop was wrong. I would have reraised it just to be sure. If he commits an other reraise, you know your kings are garbage. If he folds, good job, you took the pot. Calling there is very risky since villain will see weakness (calling is almost always weak). What will you ...


4

Well, IMHO, your analysis is pretty good. However, you see this kind of play all the time even in big tournaments. And in general, this play from the A8 is usually not a bad one. Whenever you have a super-short stack (really anything under 10 BBs) then they are capable of pushing with just about anything. In fact, there comes a time that it just doesn't ...


4

You were unlucky that Villain hits his flush on runner-runner. This frequently happen on micro-stakes where the play takes check-check and someones hits his K♠2♥ 2-pair on river and beat opponent's Q⋄Q♠ Your 3-bet raise PF was weak, you should 3-bet raise him $0.08 (3BB+1). $0.06 is a typical opening raise where no one limped ...


4

The point of hold-em is that your hand is the best possible five-card combination from all seven cards. So, in this case, yes, it is a split pot. All players (as you describe them) have a 6-high straight. That's the best possible hand, so that's their hand.


4

I Made a ruling on this exact situation. The pot was small (1/2 NL, $5), there was an ace high straight on board, the ruling was that the pot was split. The ruling was technically incorrect. I made the ruling I did because the pot was small, and it was not a big deal to rule this way in the best interest of the game. However I also announced to the table, ...


4

Note 1 in the article on Hold'em Odds elaborates on this a bit further: [Note 1] By removing reflection and applying aggressive search tree pruning, it is possible to reduce the number of unique head-to-head hand combinations from 207,025 to 47,008. Reflection eliminates redundant calculations by observing that given hands h_1 and h_2, if w_1 is the ...


3

The answer to this question addresses the 100 hands before you got your AA, not the AA itself. If you get AA, then usually cram and press pre-flop. Unless, of course, you feel unusually lucky and feel like playing a subtle hand and try to outplay your opponents - good luck. As Doyle Brunson put it, AA is a great way to win a small pot or loose a big one. ...


3

With the Villain playing fairly tight and limping frequently, I would suspect that he has been looking to set mine. He might be willing to call 5BB with any pocket pair (and a few other hands) since he's on the button, but from your description of his play I would say he most likely has a medium to high pocket pair 77+. His reraise on the flop makes me ...


3

I have to go against the flow on this one. I dont think you played it fine. I have not palyed the specific tournament and am not aware of the table dynamics at the given point but raising 2.5bb vs 2 limpers is not really ok in my opinion. Against 2 limpers you need to raise more (at least 3.5-4bb I think) in order to have fold equity. Since JQs is not an ...


3

This is a difficult one, they all clearly have a hand of some description. To be making these kind of bets they have to have some sort of pocket pair like AA, KK(not that likely since you have it, but still possible), QQ, JJ etc. They could also have hands like AKs-A10s and are just trying to spike an Ace. There are no danger cards on the board that scare ...


3

great question!!! when reaching near the bubble there are three types of players (=stack sizes): 1. those who struggle to just get into the money (and have small stacks). 2. those who have enough money to get in the money and do nothing unless they have really good hands (don't leave their comfort zone). and .. 3. those who have big stacks or medium stack ...


3

There's a couple of things that come into play here: 1 - I think you need to clarify the action. Did you raise or did you go all-in? There is a huge difference between those two actions, the latter makes your hand seem stronger than the former move. Your post says you just raised - what was the action after that? 2 - you have to look at it from his ...


3

If on the button and nobody has called, try to steal the blinds, if in early and middle position and nobody has raised limp. If in early middle position and somebody raised fold. If in the blinds and somebody is raising very late or on the button, make a call. If somebody raises in early to middle position, this hand is a fold. Raising this hand in early ...


3

When the book was written limit hold'em was the dominate form of hold'em, with significant differences then the way the game is played today. No limit was a rare game. I worked at the mirage from 90 to 98, and dealt no limit once, to Stu Unger and another player. S&M at the time probably did not even consider much what the differences were, and if they ...


2

Having such a memorization mechanism that allows you to have a decent starting hand chart in your head is only going to help you in very very early stages of learning the game. There are a lot of books and poker strategy websites where such charts can be found. I've noticed that those charts encourage you to play your hand if it's strong (medium to big ...


2

Gaz makes a lot of good points. The goal with aces is to get all the money in preflop, but you should absolutely slow down and reevaluate postflop. Board texture, opponent types and tendencies, reads, stack sizes, etc. all come into play after the flop comes out and your opponent is betting and/or not folding to your bets. Don't get married to aces postflop; ...


2

The short answer is that this is just the nature of things when playing for play money. When you get pocket aces, you often can (and should) get all of your chips in pre-flop because most play money players simply don't care. If someone before you raises, you can usually just shove all in and get multiple callers. Long term, you will still make (a lot) ...


2

First of all if you can get someone to commit all of their chips pre flop when you hold Aces then you are doing well. You should be fist pumping at this stage as you are the favourite. If they suck out post flop then thats just varience you did the hard part getting all of your chips in pre which is +EV. You should always play the hand aggressively, but try ...


2

Of course that you can beat both systems by calling with KK+, but we are here to win and exploit our opponents, so we won't play only the nuts. You can build your own calling ranges to get the preflop equity that you want, but remember that here there is a trade-off between equity and how many times you actually win the HU battle. If you play only AA, ...


2

The question, as always, is, "Why is this person still playing?" If you are up against someone whom you know chases wild draws, like drawing to a flush with only three suited cards, then you may well get busted when they actually do get lucky and flop a set. On the other hand, if the player isn't a loose cannon, but limped in and calls bets on the flop, ...


2

Sometimes you realy can't avoid it It realy depends what type of game you are playing if it's super turbo or turbo where you are < 10 BB i guess shoving PF is the right play. If you have no information about your player and you have 20BB in a fast pace game i don't think you can avoid an all in either because of the 5-7BB PF raise. Tournament play and ...


2

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. • If a player goes all-in for less than the minimum legal raise after the open raiser, and is called by at least another player, the open raiser will only be ...



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