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6

Focus on playing hands that have polarized showdown value. High flush draws and pocket pairs (preflop) are good examples. Basically, against passive callers, the difficulty is that you don't gain information about what they have during the hand, so you have to play only hands where you can be sure you're either leading or losing with high certainty, and ...


5

Ok. Let's take this one step at a time. You describe your opponent as a "maniac". However, that player displays no "maniac" behavior in this hand, so I'm not sure where to go with that. I'd like more information on how you get that read on the player. But we can still analyze the hand. So you wake up with A4os in middle position and decide to raise 6x ...


4

My initial reaction when reading this hand was that a push was the easy play. After thinking about it a little, I'm not sure that it's so clear. Make no mistake, a push is absolutely a good, profitable play, but maybe just calling is better for the following reason: given his range, (which btw, I think is too tight--you shouldn't ever totally discount ...


4

As I am not allowed to comment below 50 reputation I have to post an answer. I mostly agree with the points of Yang. I would consider playing a Tight Agrgressive (TAG) style of Play as the best optpion here. The general guideline of poker is to maximize your wins and minimize your losses. Meaning to extract the most possible value if you're ahead with smth. ...


3

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have to be $70. There are a few places I've been with a house rule that an all-in of more than half the proper amount does constitute a raise, and so in one of those ...


2

Often the reason you end up loosing before reaching a final table means you didn't put enough pressure or you pressured randomly. Knowing your opponents is the key to success in poker. You should maybe try to learn on playing against better players(it's called leveling yourself). You're really good playing against bad players but late stage most of the bad ...


2

Limit games are very tricky with this. If in a 3/6 Hold'em game, player A bets $3, and player B goes all-in with $4, then player C has the option to call the all-in, complete the raise to $6, or fold. If player C completes the raise to $6 then player A may call the $6, fold, or reraise to $9. Now, on the flip side, if player A bets $3, and player B goes ...


2

Bad beat Jackpots are zero sum. There is really no skill involved in hitting one. The hands you need to start with, essentially pocket jacks or better, you are usually going to be playing anyway. Then there are the small suited connectors. Many players play these hands for way to much on the premise that a jackpot justifies it. The big problem with a big ...


2

I am waffling on this. I think I could be convinced by any strategy that tries to get all of UTG+2's stack in the middle, and I could also be convinced to fold to a shove by UTG+2 if you call or min-raise the flop. I think this really comes down to reads you might have on UTG+2. If he's tight, then I'd be inclined to fold against a flop reshove from him. ...


2

The K high flush tried to trap the lower flush on the turn and lost that opportunity. If someone had trips or two pair, they are not slow playing to let the straight/flush come on the turn. The 'Hero' should have bet a little more on the flop. When the flush came on the turn, he should have again bet 1/2 pot to see if there was still interest in the hand. ...


1

Antes simply up your cost per round. In tournament play this means that you will need to gamble slightly more. You will need to be less selective and more aggressive because you simply do not have the time to be as selective as you were before the antes came into play.


1

To me there is nothing magic. And there is no mathematical proof on how to play a tournament. When you look at your stack determine how many orbits (blinds plus antes) you have left. Have some enter the pot practices based on number of orbits left. If the blinds will go up before you get to the blind then that should go into your current orbits left ...


1

On the flop you had top pair flush draw open ended straight draw you have 17 outs (counting trip jacks) Yes you could have bet more on the flop to chase off a draw but you got to figure you have a better draw and likely the best made hand. You are only behind a set, two pair, or TQ straight. If they had any of those they should have raised on the flop to ...


1

Sorry for the sick bump. First off about me. I used to be an online pro between 2008 to 2014, with my main game being 10/20 6max of NL and PLO, though I have played as high as 200/400. Short stacking is often a misunderstood "strategy". It gets a bad rap because of ratholers, but it's not all that bad of an idea for most people (provided you know how to ...


1

"Having made the assumption stated". You absolutely positively put him on AA or KK. If you really put your opponent on AA or KK then you should have folded to the pre flop raise. If you really felt you needed trips or 2 pair to win the hand you should have folded to the 5 bb raise. In that situation if you put your opponent on AA or KK then you were ...


1

You should ask a tougher question. The play was perfect, you put him accurately on a range of hands that made it prudent for you to check behind him on the flop, and you got all in when you had the best of it, with a push that would put your opponent in the chip and a chair position if he lost. You would rather have a call here from your opponent, but only ...


1

@Dutch.Boyd's answer contradicts the very TDA he posted with it. B: In no-limit and pot limit, an all-in wager of less than a full raise does not reopen the betting to a player who has already acted. Therefor, in a NL game, if you bet 500 and the action comes back to you, you may only re-raise if another player has made a full raise behind you. A full ...


1

The only way to get it out of the PT client is through their export command. It gives you a CSV file which you should be able to import to excel and play with the data, make graphs, whatever. I don't know of any programs that are specifically made for PT but it's just a pgSQL database running on your system which makes it actually easier than a program ...


1

For me, the best way to play Aces is to sometimes limp-in and other times raising preflop. In the games I play, if I raise 15 to 20 it doesn't surprise me to to get 3 to 5 callers. The problem I run into, is let's say I get 3 callers of 20 dollars, now there 80 in the pot and, even with a good flop for Aces, it's so hard to know where my opponents are at. ...


1

Two and a half additional points: 1) You do not mention what the buy-in is for those $2,500 in chips, but the style of play you cite indicates the players assign low value to those chips. So, to help change the "calling station" behavior, you should increase the buy-in or reduce the number of chips received. 2) Winning against such players is not about ...


1

Against these types of players you want to make a strong pair and bet big on all streets for value. If you get raised, just fold unless you have a stronger hand than medium two pair. You don't even need to continuation bet as a bluff against these players. Firing double or triple barrel bluffs is totally unnecessary and is just fancy play syndrome at this ...


1

The most common way to blow up a big stack is to get in a confrontation with an aggressive opponent who also has a big stack. If you enter a pot with such an opponent, make sure you either have position on him or a very strong hand. Your chip advantage is put to much better use pressuring small and average stacks. Make small bets and raises that could ...



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