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11

What are Pot Odds? Pot odds are the value of the pot (how much you stand to win) in comparison to the cost of you calling, and are most often used to evaluate the value of making the considered call. Calculating Pot Odds Pot odds are a ratio, Pot Value : Call Cost To convert this ratio to an equivalent percentage, divide the Call Cost by the sum of the ...


11

The simple case, for making your hand on the next turn, is to add up the number of cards that can give you the winning hand on the next turn, and divide by the total number of unseen cards left in the deck. This means that, in games like Stud, you need to remove any potential outs that have been folded by others from the cards that can give you a winning ...


10

After the flop you've seen 4 cards of your suit, and 1 of another suit. This leaves 9 cards of your suit, and 38 of a different suit; your odds of completing your flush on the turn are thus 9/47, or 19.14%. If the flop hasn't completed your flush, your odds of completing it on the river are 9/46, or 19.5%. This means that the total odds for completing a ...


10

Here is a nice tool called pokertablestats.com and propokertools.com to help you calculate your chances! A good rule of thumb I always use for calculating odds is multiply number of outs(13 with 4 on the flop and 2 on the turn. This way it will be much easier to remember and you are never that far away from the correct percentage. If you do not understand ...


8

(oh well instead of commenting I may as well post this as an answer) You're asking two different questions and they have two different answers. Are burnt cards significant in odds calculation? No. They're not different than any other card still in the deck. there is also the possibility that some of our out cards have been folded by our ...


7

No, those cards have no significance to odds calculation. If I shuffle a fresh deck, what is the chance the the top card is the Ace of Spades? 1 in 52. If I deal off the top 10 cards face down, what is the chance that the card on top now is the Ace of Spades? Still 1 in 52. The same probability will apply to the rest of the cards in the deck, including ...


7

I was thinking about how to explain my question a bit more and then realised I could work out the answer. I wrote a small python script to count all the badugis one can be dealt. 715 badugis in total 4 high: 1, 0.1% of tot. Cum 1, 0.1% of total 5 high: 4, 0.6% of tot. Cum 5, 0.7% of total 6 high: 10, 1.4% of tot. Cum 15, 2.1% of ...


7

Yes, you can and you should. The concept you're describing is called implied odds (the estimated profit you'll make if you make your hand). Notice is a much less concrete value as it is an estimation of whether your opponent will call when the draw comes and the amount he'll be willing to pay. There's also the concept of reverse implied odds which are the ...


6

The odds of getting a 4 of a kind given 7 cards (2 in your hand and 5 on the board) are (13 * (48 choose 3)) / (52 choose 7) or 0.00168067227. The probability of getting that specific 4 of a kind again are now (48 choose 3) / (52 choose 7) or 0.000129282482. The probability of both events occurring is 0.00168067227* 0.000129282482, which is ...


6

"Power" of a hand is in practice an oversimplified notion. I will touch equity and your sub-question about what it says about a hand's goodness. If you're just trying to code equity, the Coding the Wheel article others have mentioned is mandatory reading for poker coders: http://www.codingthewheel.com/archives/poker-hand-evaluator-roundup As for the ...


6

Your question can be re-written like this: What are the odds of having 4 cards with the same suit, from the 5 available community cards? The answer can be found by using basic probabilities and computing probabilities of composed events. You can have 5 boards in which 4 cards are of the same suit: XXXXY XXXYX XXYXX XYXXX YXXXX Here, X means the suit ...


5

To understand Implied Odds (IO) it's useful to clarify what It's counterpart is, Explicit Odds (EO).  EO describes how much you will win immediately in relation to what you have to risk. This is described in terms of a ratio, Total pot size : Amount we have to call. For example, current pot size is $50. Your opponent bets $50. Therefore, the current pot ...


5

There are many elements of information that are vital to know here. Some of them are, Is the call (T$700) the only chip amount you'll have to commit to call? Are any players All-In? Do you need to consider money from the blinds that is in the pot already? Is there a chance that you or your opponent will fold on later streets? and more... Technically, if ...


5

There are thumb rules for the preflop equity (against a single random opponent) of pocket pairs and suited-connected combos. For the equity of a pocket pair, you calculate how many cards away from 2 your cards are (for example, Queens are 10 cards away from 2), multiply by 3 and add 50%. So QQ's preflop equity is approximately: (10 * 3) + 50 = 80% For ...


5

As you can imagine, your equity in a heads up hand with no rake, where you bet preflop and deal out all community cards without betting, will be 50%. Other variations of this, such as the dealer winning ties or the introduction of a rake, will lower your equity (and since this is a casino game, I'm willing to bet that they have something in their favor). ...


4

In tournaments, there are often factors that trump pot odds or implied odds when making decisions. Your stack size (and the comparative positions you'll be left in if you call-and-lose vs call-and-win vs fold) is often first and foremost in that list. In no particular order, other factors include table dynamics (e.g. are you going to have opportunities to ...


4

If your opponent has 10 000 in chips and the blinds are 200/400 your normal raise would be something around 1000 - 1350 which means that it's with the blinds something around 20% of your opponent's stack. He can go All in now and win your bet + blinds which is not much but can lose a lot (everything) if he gets called by you (or even reraised all in). If he ...


4

For an open-ended straight draw, there are exactly 8 cards that will give you your straight: 4 of each suit at the low end, and 4 of each suit at the high end. However, to make a flush, you have 9 cards available that will make your flush, as there are 13 cards to a suit, and you have 4 of them in your hand. At 3 cards to the set (again assuming an outside ...


4

Pot odds are a way of determining whether it's worthwhile to continue with a hand. Suppose that the pot contains $10 at the river and your opponent bets $2. You think that there's a 20% chance that you have the best hand, and that if you raise your opponent will fold a worse hand or reraise a better one, so your options are to call or fold. What should you ...


4

It all depends on pot odds. If you have better than 50% pot odds and have 50% equity versus your opponent's range, and you have the bankroll to handle the variance, then you should be looking to play for stacks. This will always produce a long term winning strategy, because you're getting >50% return on a 50% bet. Do you see why? The only situation where ...


4

The article is correct in the way it uses 4:1 and 5:1. Under their assumptions (actual value given their example is more like 4.2:1), you are "4 to 1" to make it while you are getting "5 to 1" on your money. I'd say that this is precisely because both are written / pronounced / thought of this way that it's convenient. If you check the Wikipedia article on ...


4

You need to calculate the odds of getting the exact flop that you need. Since the order doesn't matter, the first card dealt would have three possibilities, and then if you got one of those you would have two possibilities on the second card, etc. It would look like this: 3/50 * 2/49 * 1/48 = 1/19,600 = 0.005% EDIT Updated based on your ...


3

A good rule of thumb I always use for a flush draw is multiply outs(13 spades - 4 spades) with 4 on the flop and 2 on the turn. This ways it's much easier to remember and you aren't that far away from the correct percentage. That is: On the flop = number of flush outs x 4 = (13-4)x 4 = 36% On the turn = number of flush outs x 2 = (13-4)x 2 = 18% ...


3

This is a good example that calling in poker is the worst thing you can do. You can't see if your opponent ist bluffing or having a big hand. Because you don't check your position by giving him a decision. First of all calling 7,5 blinds with JQ offsuit is questionable. The flop is good for you. You are holding 2 overcards and an open endet straight ...


3

I'm not entirely sure what you are trying to say with the math that you have in your question, but I think you are trying to show how you get the odds of hitting a flush or a straight on the turn or river when you have 4-to-a-flush/straight-draw on the flop. The same basic strategy of calculating odds can be done to see what your chances are to hit a set on ...


2

Let's take a concrete example, so it's a bit easier to understand. You are playing with Alice and Bob. The blinds are 50/100. You are the big blind, Alice is under the gun, and Bob is the small blind. You post 50, and Bob posts 100 blind. Alice calls 100. Bob raises to 400. Currently, the pot contains 550. To call, you would need to add 350 to your 50. If ...


2

When holding a pocket pair, you will hit a set one time in 8. That's 12%. Rough math at the table means that you can set-mine if you expect to make 10x your preflop call amount when the set comes (which is going to be a factor of bet-size, stack-size, and opponent tendencies).


2

People are puzzled by this because it is easier to make a straight starting to with two straight cards (8% of the time) than a flush starting with two flush cards (6% of the time). But GIVEN four of a flush on the flop and four to a straight (open-ended on both sides) it is easier to make the flush (35% of the time from the flop) than the straight (32% of ...


2

Many times it is fold or all in with low stack. In this case an all in would double up. I'm assuming your stack is small relative to the BB. Sometimes you have to take a chance if you don't want to die by the blinds. If pot odds were in my favor and I had a small stack (<15 BB) I would go all in.


2

In limit poker, implied odds refer to what you can collect in future bets from an opponent, if you complete your draw (e.g. to a straight or flush) and make your hand. Let's say that you are playing $5-10, and your opponent has bet $10 on the turn with say, a pair, making a pot of $90. If you are drawing to a straight or flush (4- to -1 against), those are ...



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