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0

I have seen it on TV a few times Based on hand independent it is 0.000256 (quad) * 0.0017 (boat) = 0.00000044 But since they share a pair on the board less than that I think the real calc is 0.0017 * 0.00101 = 0.00000172 From the boat there are 45 cards out and need to match the pair on the board So the odds of getting quadded are: (2/2) / (45/2) = ...


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In cash playing 99 is completely and utterly standard in full ring utg and utg+1 and anyone who tells you different is a complete and utter nit. In an MTT it could be a fold if certain ICM effects are present.


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Your simplification is over simplified. If you want actual odds uses a calculator At the table it is simple. If you are getting 2:1 on your money AQ is only not getting pot odds against AA, KK, AK, and QQ. It is pretty easy to figure out the hands you are 2:1 dog to. KQ is actually close. The quick safe bet is any two cards Q or better. You are ...


1

I would definitely play 99 from any position (or even 88 from UTG). The hand itself is certainly not a strong one if it remains unimproved and pre-flop it might be near the bottom of my range (depending on table dynamics) but I don't think it's ever unplayable. Like all hands I will play, if I'm first to open (I'm either UTG or it's been folded to me), I'm ...


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My answer is no 99 against 7 random hands is 19% or about 4:1 There is a saying You win small pots with marginal hands and lose big pots And in this case it is so true Position, position, position Even if you hit a set you lose 1 bet by being out of position As first to act you don't know how many are going to be in the pot If you get 3 bet you ...


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I would play 99 in early position. I would do a standard raise from this position. If the flop contains a 9 you are golden. Anything below 9 you still have good odds. Anything above a 9 could be in your range (at least my range) for early position play.


1

Just outs to improve on the next card is fairly straight forward. Probability to win is much more complex. If it is just you against a single player on the river then you can calculate. A starting hand against 3 random hands is very complex. I assume you mean chances (not change). You have poker calculators but there is no formula A straight can get ...


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You can use this this calculator, but basically you would need to know your opponents hand in order to actually calculate the odds. The probability you have of hitting your outs however, can be calculated. Take a look at my other answer to learn how. If you have a solid read you could try to include the probability of him hitting his hand after you have ...



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