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13

When it comes to seat positions in poker, you have to keep in mind that it varies depending on how many players there are at the table. So, here they are: 2 players: Dealer, Big Blind (in this case, the Dealer is also the Small Blind). The Dealer acts first preflop, but last post-flop 3 players: Dealer, Small Blind, Big Blind 4 players: Dealer, Small ...


13

You're missing the whole betting process, which is key in poker. Cards are dealt randomly, but afterwards, the players will wager on the strength of their hand until one of two things happen: all players but one have folded their hands or; the latest bet have been called by everyone still at the table. So if you are a winning poker player, your betting ...


9

When I tell my non-poker playing friends that I play poker they thing I'm gambling - until I give them the following explaination. Poker, played correctly, is not gambling in my opinion. And I think this is a good way to explain EV to non-poker players or new players. The idea in poker is to do two things - make correct decisions based on available ...


8

There have been several posts already here explaining how to compute side-pots (note that the subject of penalty blinds has not been dealt with but that is another topic). Here's one such topic: How are side pots built? Question. Is the ratio against the total pot... or the other winners? Is this correct? Get a ratio compared to others? The ...


8

Probability: the chance of a particular outcome. More precisely, the probability of any given outcome is the ratio of all the favorable outcomes and every outcome that is possible. (so favorable / everything) The probability of throwing 6 with a dice is exactly 1/6 because all the sides are perfectly equal, there are 6 of them but only 1 is favorable in ...


7

I was thinking about how to explain my question a bit more and then realised I could work out the answer. I wrote a small python script to count all the badugis one can be dealt. 715 badugis in total 4 high: 1, 0.1% of tot. Cum 1, 0.1% of total 5 high: 4, 0.6% of tot. Cum 5, 0.7% of total 6 high: 10, 1.4% of tot. Cum 15, 2.1% of ...


7

The books your are reading are telling you to play this way as it will help you to exploit these kind of players and its correct. Its not telling you how they need to react to counter your play style. If you are playing against a tight player you can definately open up your range a lot more and make aggressive plays. If they miss the flop then they are ...


7

You can't adjust the "outs" because you don't have enough information (that's what poker is, a game of incomplete information) but that's perfectly ok because the outs themselves do mean absolutely nothing. If I tell you, you have 16 outs to win... are you ahead or are you most likely dead? You don't know, 16 outs means you're ahead in the flop but you're ...


7

Yes, you can and you should. The concept you're describing is called implied odds (the estimated profit you'll make if you make your hand). Notice is a much less concrete value as it is an estimation of whether your opponent will call when the draw comes and the amount he'll be willing to pay. There's also the concept of reverse implied odds which are the ...


6

The calculations given in your example make sense. Except you write 53/44 when you should have written 35/44 I believe. In the case that player A checks, the expectation value of profit will be: <(A)>=(35/44)*400 + (9/44)*0 = (35/44)*400 = 318 In the case that player B bets $60, and player A calls, the pot increases to 400 + 60 + 60. The expected ...


6

I think we should not consider heads up match here, when players are "tuning" their style to the opponent. This approach is reasonable against the average field. For example, if you play on a tight table, the aggressive style is beneficial, and on the contrary being neat is profitable against "loose" table on the average.


6

In my experience: One approach in this spots, is enter the pot only if you have position If you don't have position enter the pot only if the rest of players are very passive If you have premium then stab the pot strongly, since pot is very small you may want only one player to stay at it. Always take in mind the size of your stack, it may help you to take ...


6

Your preflop actions look fine. You have the second best starting hand in poker, so 4betting strongly is correct. The 3-5-6 rainbow flop is coordinated, but you worrying about hands like 2-4 and 4-7 is just silly. Think about it: would you call a 4-bet preflop with this kind of hand? Probably not unless you were super deepstacked (which you didn't mention, ...


6

Probably but these "thinking procedures" only apply when given a hand to analyse. When you're sitting at a table, you're aware of everyone's stack sizes, positions, previous actions, table image, etc. all the time so the only things that you really look at in each hand are the pot size and the two cards you put players on. Then, depending on who's in the ...


5

I think it's more of a convention than a rule of logic. That said, there are compelling reasons why this is the case. Mostly, it's to address the imbalance that would be created if, in heads-up play, the button was also the Big Blind (BB). Here are my thoughts: If you give the BB the button, then they act last pre-flop and post-flop. Acting last is one of ...


5

The correct bluffing frequency is a subjective measure. It all depends on the perceived probability that your opponent will call your bluff, and the estimated equity you have at that moment, whichever street you're on. Similar to the question How Do I Calculate EV Of Shoving..., you can work out how often bluffing would be a profitable play by manipulating ...


5

To convert backdoor draws into probabilities, you need to multiply the probability of hitting the first card by the probability of hitting the second card given that you hit the first card. How do I measure the probability that my straight backdoor draw will be realized at the river? It depends on the number of gaps you have in your draw; Suppose we ...


5

You haven't provided enough information. This is entirely dependent on what the action was leading to the all-in, current stack sizes, and the frequency with which your opponent is taking said action. I can tell you, just from experience, that your opponent would either need to be very short stacked, ~13-15BB or less, or jamming all-in with a very wide ...


4

If your opponent has 10 000 in chips and the blinds are 200/400 your normal raise would be something around 1000 - 1350 which means that it's with the blinds something around 20% of your opponent's stack. He can go All in now and win your bet + blinds which is not much but can lose a lot (everything) if he gets called by you (or even reraised all in). If he ...


4

Assuming the purpose of the simulation is to determine a useful ordering of hands, the first thing to know is that there is no one true ordering, due to the non-transitivity of hand strengths. So, all orderings are approximations. This subject has been tackled by many authors in print. A notably useful approach is in Kill Everyone by Nelson, Streib, and ...


4

there is a very clear rule regarding pots and side pots: you can earn according to the chips you risk. Lets assume that the chips you put in the middle are no longer yours... in the scenario above villain1 risk 45$ (40$ as an ante and 5$ as the big blind). If villain1 was the winner, he would have won 335$ (8*40 of the ante and 3*5$ from the pot). ...


4

For an open-ended straight draw, there are exactly 8 cards that will give you your straight: 4 of each suit at the low end, and 4 of each suit at the high end. However, to make a flush, you have 9 cards available that will make your flush, as there are 13 cards to a suit, and you have 4 of them in your hand. At 3 cards to the set (again assuming an outside ...


4

To have every nut hand in your range: 22+, 32s+, 42s+, 52s+, ATs (pocket pairs; suited 0, 1, and 2 gappers; ATs) 22+ covers all nut 4-board-card straight flushes, and the combination of {32s+, 42s+, 52s+, ATs} (ATs is a special case for KQJ) covers all 3-board-card straight flushes. Since it includes one of every rank, it covers quads with 3-of-a-kind on ...


4

Well, it's actually pretty easy. In Texas Hold'em you can combine them anyway you want. So the answer is yes, you can choose all the 5 community cards to form your hand1. In fact, in Texas Hold'em, the total number of ways you can combine the cards is: (7!) / ((5!) x (7 - 5)!) = (6 x 7) / 2! = (6 x 7) / 2 = 42 / 2 = 21. where n! = n factorial = 1 x 2 x 3 ...


4

TAG/LAG is all relative to the mathematical sub games. If a guy is an over aggressive calling station in 3bet pots then you need to craft a thorough strategy to exploit that specifically. This would probably involve opening smaller and less often so that your range has a much higher percentage of monsters while losing less on the weak part of your ...


4

As well as the link Toby has suggested above take a look a the following: the simple psychology of postflop play How to play after the flop Post flop strategy Post flop play after missing flop Top 15 Poker - Post Flop strategy Partypoker - Post flop play Pokerstars Pokerschool - Post Flop quiz The last one is a quiz. There are a lot of useful quizzes on ...


4

The betting behavior of players does not affect the order in which action takes place in later betting rounds. When new community cards are dealt (flop, turn and river), the new betting round starts with the first player left of the dealer, if he/she hasn't folded in the previous betting round. In the examples you give, nobody folds so this would be the ...


4

Say we have a $1 million raffle that has only two tickets: a winner and a loser. I give you a random ticket and tell you that you MUST sell it. How much money should you sell it for? (I.e. how much is it worth?) A. $1 million? No, because it could just as easily be worth $0. B. $0? No, because it could just as easily be worth $1 million. C. $0.5 million? ...


4

I think about my opponents range, my percieved range, previous action in this hand(Is the pot raised/limped preflop? What are their ranges for raise/limp preflop?), pot/stack ration, stack sizes, plan for future streets, timing. In tourneys/SNG you also need to think about other concepts: ICM, phase of tourney(early, bubble, in the money), NASH Would like ...


4

If one is a hold em player, after playing Omaha as a serious student for a time you will notice that with starting hands you will be playing less hands than in Holdem, and if you are playing 8 or better you will be playing even less hands then in Omaha high. Omaha is a drawing game. It is rare for pocket pairs to win straight out at showdown. Big pairs ...



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