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7

Yes, you can and you should. The concept you're describing is called implied odds (the estimated profit you'll make if you make your hand). Notice is a much less concrete value as it is an estimation of whether your opponent will call when the draw comes and the amount he'll be willing to pay. There's also the concept of reverse implied odds which are the ...


6

Probably but these "thinking procedures" only apply when given a hand to analyse. When you're sitting at a table, you're aware of everyone's stack sizes, positions, previous actions, table image, etc. all the time so the only things that you really look at in each hand are the pot size and the two cards you put players on. Then, depending on who's in the ...


5

You haven't provided enough information. This is entirely dependent on what the action was leading to the all-in, current stack sizes, and the frequency with which your opponent is taking said action. I can tell you, just from experience, that your opponent would either need to be very short stacked, ~13-15BB or less, or jamming all-in with a very wide ...


4

Say we have a $1 million raffle that has only two tickets: a winner and a loser. I give you a random ticket and tell you that you MUST sell it. How much money should you sell it for? (I.e. how much is it worth?) A. $1 million? No, because it could just as easily be worth $0. B. $0? No, because it could just as easily be worth $1 million. C. $0.5 million? ...


4

I think about my opponents range, my percieved range, previous action in this hand(Is the pot raised/limped preflop? What are their ranges for raise/limp preflop?), pot/stack ration, stack sizes, plan for future streets, timing. In tourneys/SNG you also need to think about other concepts: ICM, phase of tourney(early, bubble, in the money), NASH Would like ...


4

If one is a hold em player, after playing Omaha as a serious student for a time you will notice that with starting hands you will be playing less hands than in Holdem, and if you are playing 8 or better you will be playing even less hands then in Omaha high. Omaha is a drawing game. It is rare for pocket pairs to win straight out at showdown. Big pairs ...


4

I think it's important to not try to bite off too much at once. You're right that you have a lot of options, but focusing on one thing and really attacking that is IMO always going to be more productive than a casual perusal of a variety of topics. You might want to look at some of the online coaching sites like CardRunners, Run It Once, or Tournament Poker ...


3

What kind of plays could I make to convince my opponents that I have a polarised hand range? You don't make plays to convince your opponents that you have a polarized hand range, you just polarize your hand range. If they fail to pick up on that, you've profited greatly. There are generally three types of ranges: Polarized With a polarized range, your ...


3

You can only lose the low hand if you get counterfeit (when a low card hits the board that also pairs one of your low cards), so that you don't hold the nut low on the river anymore. If there is a low hand possible, and no A or 2 on the board, you always have the nut low. At worst, you will split the low pot if someone else also has a A2XX hand. With that ...


3

I think I would have shoved preflop. You only had 13bbs. So AKs shove in this position is good in my opinion. I dont think he would have been calling you once you shoved over the top either. So in my opinion yes you played it wrong.


3

Definitely yes, its worth it. For example: you play MTTs, in the middle of tournament, and you've got a decent stack of chips (not short stacked). Blinds are going high, and a lot of short stacked players will start going all in. And that's where poker math comes into play. Its the best time to increase your stack by doing some calls, if odds / pot odds are ...


3

First off, I think this is a GREAT question! I'm not sure if I have a procedure that I follow, but I definitely have reminders for myself. Little things that I tell myself to re-enforce concepts that I want to exercise. Some of mine include: "You're in early position, play tight, tight, tight!" "You're on the button, let's see if we can steal something ...


3

I'll give you my perspective as someone who has abandoned cash games in favor of only doing live MTTs. I think a lot of this will depend on your current level of experience and your game will change over time. Of course, you need to be sound in things like picking your pre-flop hands, but these are some things that I know I need to work on for my tourneys: ...


2

First of all it's important to explain that EV is a concept rooted in the law of large numbers, and which poker players use to calculate risk and reward. I'll get back to this concept. When calculating EV a poker player takes a few things into consideration: 1) The size of the pot 2) The probability of winning that pot 2) The size of the bet they're faced ...


2

When you say cutoff 3bet 6k i guess you meant he bet 6k. At that point you have 13bb you could push which would increase your stack of about 23% if he folds. If his stack is between 26k-46k your fold equity is pretty high. Against an unknown player it seems to me the best play for you is to push and don't see a flop. Playing post flop would be hard for you ...


2

this page does a very good job of explaining variance and expected value http://www.thepokerbank.com/strategy/other/variance/


2

I decided to have a go at answering this myself. The situation is you against one other player who has a made hand, and you have N outs. Before the turn, the 1-step EV (ignoring any bets on the river) is EV1 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * (-10) The two-step EV, taking river bets into account, is EV2 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * [ N/46 * (X + 20) + (46-N)/46 ...


2

Many years ago I struggled to play at micro stakes level because the level of the players was so bad... Anyway, once you adapt to it, it's actually really really really easy to win at those micro stakes. If you want to play ABC poker, then go play on low stakes, just outside the micro stake region. Remember, at any level there will be fishes, and one does ...


2

First, be aware that the Chen formula can only be a very rough guideline as to whether to play your hand. It is not the be-all and end-all. Also note that Bill Chen himself said that the formula can only help inform you what hands to play. It can't tell you when you should check, call, raise etc. That said, hands that score well on the Chen formula are ...


2

I have always followed the Sam Farha mantra: Against a good player I can outplay him, but against a poor player I need a hand. Good player recognize a situation in which they may not have the best likely hood of winning a hand. It could be argued it costs them pots, but on the long run it would be a profitable situation. Weaker players don't recognize ...


2

You remind me of a session I had with a poker coach. He had an interesting take on this same scenario and that's to go all-in on the flop - the call would be a "mistake". Your analysis is right on the odds, and yes, you would be frozen-out on odds if the opponent bet's 1000 into you. The thinking was to avoid the exact scenario you're describing. The all-in ...


2

I just read this section of the book and was surprised by the error addressed here. Agree with Stefan's analysis. Whilst it is true that to solve 5x - 0.2 = 0 is the calculation which matters - whether to call or fold, it certainly doesn't determine the expectation. The graph on page 49 is also wrong. If A bluffs 10% of the time, for example, then B has a ...


2

Knowing poker math has helped me bet (and win) the occasional hand by understanding pot odds. That made it "worth it" for me. More to the point, it's worth it for someone who plays "occasionally" or more.


2

Of course it's worth it. Playing profitable poker comes down to two fundamental principles: Identify your opponent's strategy. Compute, and implement, the best response. You're falling prey to a common misconception about poker. Too many players try to justify only focusing on principle #1 because it's far easier and more intuitive than putting in hard ...


2

There's a bunch of hard-skills (you mentioned some) which you will gain naturally as you play more poker. Specific plays, situations that always play out in certain ways, etc. But there are also a lot of soft skills which it's harder to figure out. (Note, I assume No-limit Texas Holdem below in concrete examples, but this applies to all versions of ...


2

In the big scheme of things at the poker table there are upsides and downsides to math, as well as with intuitive play. For the sack of clarity, generally speaking intuitive play is doing what you feel is right, and mathematical play is what you figure out is right based on a range of factors. Neither is a strategy, they are how you approach the game. The ...


2

Nothing, besides perhaps criminal investigation. Poker is not a sport with a sanctioning body like the NBA, NFL etc, that has sanctioning powers in this respect. Casino promoters, (Use this term as a catch all for the operators and organizers) have regular powers to disqualify players, but unless there was some kind of incident, like a fist fight at the ...


2

You start with yourself. Poker is broad, a few minutes to learn then a lifetime to master. You discover were you are weak, and were you are strong. Then exploit and learn accordingly. There are huge resources and no silver bullets. Your question is not a good question in the sense that it can not be answered simply. It cannot be answered easily because what ...


1

It's not a paradox. Loose and tight are distinct concepts from aggressive and passive. Loose/tight refers to how many hands a player plays. Aggressive/passive refers to how he plays them, specifically whether he tends to bet more or call more. A player who folds too much to aggression is called weak. Thus, there are many combinations of styles that you can ...


1

Example: You have A2, villain has A3. Board is: 24567. That gives you a low: A2456 Gives villain low: A2345 Basically, whenever one of your cards pairs, you might be in danger.



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