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3

Frisbee's answer is correct. But it only answers for eight players (although the other numbers are hidden in that table). Since the OP asked for 8-10, I will add the answers for nine and ten players. The odds of an ace not occurring in the next x cards dealt (after you're dealt two aces) is ( 48!/(48-x)! )/( 50!/(50-x)! ). That's the probability that no one ...


0

--Even further, in his poker lessons at MIT, Will Ma states that most players bluff too much or don't bluff enough.-- This is a ludicrous statement. If you have calculated an optimum bluff frequency then half the players will be higher and half lower minus the very few who nail the frequency exactly. As several other posters have noted, the actual optimum ...


-4

Jack is definitely right, Frisbee, thus you're very wrong. The odds of getting dealt pocket aces are 1/221 (4/52*3/51). Odds that another ace has been dealt out preflop is 2/50, so roughly 4%.


2

Pick is it 8 or 10 At 8 I think it is 0.4114 Or 1.4306 : 1 This is for exactly one ace out - (not two) Using combination (2/1) * (48/13) / (50/14) (2 aces need 1) (48 non ace need 13) / (50 cards need 14) Both other aces out would be 0.0743 Add them for 1 or 2 aces out = 0.4857 You can get that same number with 1 - 48 / 50 * = ...


0

I have seen it on TV a few times Based on hand independent it is 0.000256 (quad) * 0.0017 (boat) = 0.00000044 But since they share a pair on the board less than that I think the real calc is 0.0017 * 0.00101 = 0.00000172 From the boat there are 45 cards out and need to match the pair on the board So the odds of getting quadded are: (2/2) / (45/2) = ...


0

Lol at the answers saying there isn't a correct frequency to bluff. I'll give a simple example where we have a polar vs bluff catcher range. This means that in the polar players range there are hands that are better than all of the bluff catching players hands and always win at showdown and hands that are worse than all of the bluff catching players hands ...


0

The idea is to bluff at a frequency that gives your opponent 0 EV f is frequency s is the fraction of the pot you bet What f gives your opponent an EV of 0? 0 = f(1 + s) - (1-f)s 0 = f + sf - s + sf 0 = f + 2sf - s s = f(1 + 2s) s / (1 + 2s) = f The mathematical number of s / (2s + 1) is a good number That is a bigger bluff frequency than most people would ...


0

Your simplification is over simplified. If you want actual odds uses a calculator At the table it is simple. If you are getting 2:1 on your money AQ is only not getting pot odds against AA, KK, AK, and QQ. It is pretty easy to figure out the hands you are 2:1 dog to. KQ is actually close. The quick safe bet is any two cards Q or better. You are ...


-1

You shouldn't have played it so aggressively. Someone with even a King is likely to call you if they are the only person left to act. At that point, having such low pairs, there a lot of different ways you can lose over the course of the next two cards. They could make a higher two pair. The board could pair, counterfeiting your two pair. Or like what really ...


1

Just outs to improve on the next card is fairly straight forward. Probability to win is much more complex. If it is just you against a single player on the river then you can calculate. A starting hand against 3 random hands is very complex. I assume you mean chances (not change). You have poker calculators but there is no formula A straight can get ...


1

You can use this this calculator, but basically you would need to know your opponents hand in order to actually calculate the odds. The probability you have of hitting your outs however, can be calculated. Take a look at my other answer to learn how. If you have a solid read you could try to include the probability of him hitting his hand after you have ...



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