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9

On the contrary of the answer above, the answer is yes, is the right move. Calling 36000 to win 87000 means that you have must have at least 29% if equity. The hands that has this equity against AK are 22+, A2s+, KTs+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s AKo, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 92o+, 82o+, 72o+, 62o+, 52o+, 42o+ even taking in to ...


7

Yes, you can and you should. The concept you're describing is called implied odds (the estimated profit you'll make if you make your hand). Notice is a much less concrete value as it is an estimation of whether your opponent will call when the draw comes and the amount he'll be willing to pay. There's also the concept of reverse implied odds which are the ...


4

The article is correct in the way it uses 4:1 and 5:1. Under their assumptions (actual value given their example is more like 4.2:1), you are "4 to 1" to make it while you are getting "5 to 1" on your money. I'd say that this is precisely because both are written / pronounced / thought of this way that it's convenient. If you check the Wikipedia article on ...


3

Is this an accurate pot odds calculation? Preflop Pot: $60 (Hero) + $60 (Villian) + $10 (Small Blind) = $130 Flop Pot $140 (Flop Bet x2) + $130 (Preflop Pot) = $270 River Pot: $140 (Hero Bet) + $340 (Villian Reraise) + $270 (Flop Pot) = $750 Yep, looks good to me. Your math is correct, although I got $750 instead of $760. This results ...


3

Definitely yes, its worth it. For example: you play MTTs, in the middle of tournament, and you've got a decent stack of chips (not short stacked). Blinds are going high, and a lot of short stacked players will start going all in. And that's where poker math comes into play. Its the best time to increase your stack by doing some calls, if odds / pot odds are ...


2

Knowing poker math has helped me bet (and win) the occasional hand by understanding pot odds. That made it "worth it" for me. More to the point, it's worth it for someone who plays "occasionally" or more.


2

I decided to have a go at answering this myself. The situation is you against one other player who has a made hand, and you have N outs. Before the turn, the 1-step EV (ignoring any bets on the river) is EV1 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * (-10) The two-step EV, taking river bets into account, is EV2 = N/47 * X + (47-N)/47 * [ N/46 * (X + 20) + (46-N)/46 ...


2

In the big scheme of things at the poker table there are upsides and downsides to math, as well as with intuitive play. For the sack of clarity, generally speaking intuitive play is doing what you feel is right, and mathematical play is what you figure out is right based on a range of factors. Neither is a strategy, they are how you approach the game. The ...


2

Of course it's worth it. Playing profitable poker comes down to two fundamental principles: Identify your opponent's strategy. Compute, and implement, the best response. You're falling prey to a common misconception about poker. Too many players try to justify only focusing on principle #1 because it's far easier and more intuitive than putting in hard ...


1

Beyond the basic math of pot odds and hand odds, you should also understand what kind of percentages you should be calling/raising/folding in different situations simply to prevent others from exploiting you. For example, if you are folding more than X % in a certain spot, it can make it profitable for opponents to play any 2 cards against you and make a ...


1

I am confused in when do we use the word odds vs outs Outs only refer to how many cards can come down on later streets which will improve a hand's absolute strength. Odds refer to how likely it is an event will occur. In poker, we are frequently calculating pot odds, which tells us, if we call a bet, how often we need to win the hand for the call to be at ...


1

Since 4:1 are the correct odds for that scenario, it seems that the sentence "If you make this call four times, mathematics says that you will hit your draw once." was a mistake, rather than an error. Their intention was probably to say that for every four times you lose you'll win one, or for every five times you play you'll win one. In any case, your ...


1

I only read a part of your question but you can indeed call when odds are not in favor. Implied pot odds is what it's called. Basically you calculate that what you payed too much, you will receive back at the next street(s). An example: Hero and Villain play a pot. On the turn you have a flush draw (giving you 9 outs). This is more or less 19% chance of ...



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