Hot answers tagged

10

For me it is not about body language when an opponent looks at his cards. I'm doing a few things when I'm waiting for my turn. Monitoring the players to act after me. There are players that will give away whether or not they want to play their hand or not before it gets to them. This has an effect of strengthening your position. If you are in mid position ...


9

If your laying down AK to a loose cannon that is raising all in all the time you are making a huge mistake. These calls you made all in were just fine. You will get the guy sooner or later. The 99 he had you were slightly behind but for the Qx you dominated. I will sometimes get out of games like this, usually because I am not able to get the guy and ...


9

On the contrary of the answer above, the answer is yes, is the right move. Calling 36000 to win 87000 means that you have must have at least 29% if equity. The hands that has this equity against AK are 22+, A2s+, KTs+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s AKo, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 92o+, 82o+, 72o+, 62o+, 52o+, 42o+ even taking in to ...


7

It does have some value (I feel as though the author's statement is a bit hyperbolic though he is trying to emphasize his point) but the types of hands that can be made postflop with your hole cards are more important because the pot grows exponentially with every street. Also note how the author starts the sentence with "deep stack." The deeper your stacks ...


6

It is definitely profitable to be calling with AKo and AKs against someone shoving 100% of their hands. Using the Poker stove calculator, AKo will win 65.20% of the time against an opponent's random holding, and will still win 62.12% of the time against an opponent who shoves only with the top 20% of hands dealt. Similarly AKs wins 67% of the time against ...


6

In the end, any formulaic starting hand strategy is going to suffer from major weaknesses due to the fact that it fails to make the proper adjustments for the specific players you are playing against. Chen's formula is no exception. If you're just starting out, this provides as good a strategy as any for giving you a place to start. It will point you in the ...


6

First, let's establish some parameters for what makes us pot-committed. Preflop, I like to stick with a 2-1 ratio, since the only way to be definitively more than 2-1 behind your opponent would be to know that his range is almost entirely made up of hands that have you dominated. We definitely know that this is not the case if we are short-stacked preflop. ...


5

There are quite a few things we need to address here. I'm going to do my best to break them down point-by-point. First off... AK is not favorite to win against so many players, is it really profitable in the long run? What should i look for in this 2 situations to decide if it's profitable on the long run? Should i consider play AQ as well in this ...


4

Well, IMHO, your analysis is pretty good. However, you see this kind of play all the time even in big tournaments. And in general, this play from the A8 is usually not a bad one. Whenever you have a super-short stack (really anything under 10 BBs) then they are capable of pushing with just about anything. In fact, there comes a time that it just doesn't ...


4

Try this link, Holdem preflop matchups. It's a zip file of all PF matchups in table form I think. Other than that, use a search engine using the terms "poker" "hand" "matchups", or some other variation with "preflop" and "probability" in there.


4

Since you didn't engage any money yet if you call you would do $2 but the minimum amount for a raise there is $4 since the $2 is from the max amount that was bet in the table and the next amount you can place is $2(max bet)+$2(BB). Answer:$4 Some casino's might have some rules and sometimes they aren't the same as in other casino's.


4

When the author of the post says "**Just** calling the big blind..." (emphasis is mine) he's referring to a strategy style where the only move some players make when opening the action is to call the big blind. I agree that it's a bad choice. I don't believe he was stating, as you say, that someone should always raise or fold preflop. His use of the phrase ...


3

pokerstove is the thing you are looking for!


3

First of all if you can get someone to commit all of their chips pre flop when you hold Aces then you are doing well. You should be fist pumping at this stage as you are the favourite. If they suck out post flop then thats just varience you did the hard part getting all of your chips in pre which is +EV. You should always play the hand aggressively, but try ...


3

I used to look immediately, but lately I've been waiting for my turn to look. The stanard reason cited by the pros to wait is that you don't give away any information to the other players watching your reaction. I say meh. Actually, Donkeyfish's response above summarizes more accurately why I now wait: it makes me think. Read this blog post for a little more ...


3

The logic of the question is on the wrong basis whatsoever. Mathematics are essential to poker, but if you try to apply them without taking into account all the other parameters you end up with simplistic dogmas, such as "You never fold kings preflop" or "If I have an ace on the button, I must open" etc. To try to approach your question, imagine a very ...


2

Gaz makes a lot of good points. The goal with aces is to get all the money in preflop, but you should absolutely slow down and reevaluate postflop. Board texture, opponent types and tendencies, reads, stack sizes, etc. all come into play after the flop comes out and your opponent is betting and/or not folding to your bets. Don't get married to aces postflop; ...


2

The short answer is that this is just the nature of things when playing for play money. When you get pocket aces, you often can (and should) get all of your chips in pre-flop because most play money players simply don't care. If someone before you raises, you can usually just shove all in and get multiple callers. Long term, you will still make (a lot) ...


2

Chen's formula is limited in the way that any formula is - as said above it doesn't take account of who you're playing against. Also, though, it has major flaws in logic (why under connectedness would Ace not count as high or low? Why would you get a bonus for making a straight with community cards higher than your hole cards, but not with community lower ...


2

Completely depends on your opponent. You can start out min-raising 90-100% but if he 3-bet shoves a ton then you can't do this. Or you can try limping and min-betting lots of flops, but he if shoves PF from the BB a ton, you can't do it (there is a hint as to how you should play against people who take those strategies themselves!). Against really good ...


2

The answer to this question is very situation dependent. In general, you need to look at what opponents will call with. If you are at a table full of nits, you can take down more pots pre-flop with a wider 3 bet range, but you will be risking a decent amount for likely smaller pots, where it might be a better risk/reward proposition to apply pressure later ...


2

Was this [calling all-in] good playing or bold (and mindless) move? This should be a snap call. AQs is just far too strong to fold. Villian would have to be 3-bet shoving a very tight range to justify folding here. Specifically, he would have to be jamming {33+, AQ+, AJs} for it to be unprofitable to call his all-in. The average opponent is 3-bet shoving ...


2

Your VP would still be 33% as you could have raised/called when you were in SB and BB - the tracker will only exclude walks where action was folded round to your BB. As for the PFR, this generally means 2-bets so will also be 33% given you raised once out of three hands where you had the option to. Your 3-bet and 4-bet stats are recorded separately and ...


2

I don't think your logic makes sense. I think you're right that if another player in late position calls, it will be leaving attractive odds for the players still to act. However, that's still a big barrier with the stack sizes of less than 50 bb. If there's just a single caller (say it's the initial raiser), there's 19 bb in the pot before the flop, so the ...


2

Based on figures from http://www.flopturnriver.com/poker-strategy/pyroxenes-common-flop-odds-19147, the odds of flopping 2 pair or better, not including draws, is just over 5.6%. Including flopping a straight or flush draw, the odds are just a hair over 27%. If your facing a raise and re-raise, you should probably fold, as you're not getting the right ...


1

As with every raise, pot odds will improve if there are callers before you. Nevertheless, pot odds will grow less fast, since the raise is significantly larger than the initial pot. Also, first you speak of a raise by 350, but in your calculations you use a raise to 350. I would not consider a raise to 350 extremely large. Furthermore, there are more things ...


1

The generally accepted response to playing against loose players is to tighten up. It's not easy to do, because it's hard to watch hand after hand being won with K8o and other garbage, but the numbers back you. Change your strategy once you have a much better read of the players around you.


1

As everybody buys in with 100 or more blinds, cash game goal is usually more lose than tournament. You have to enlarge your preflop range, especially in late position, to see more flops. You also have to strenghten your post flop play, as everything starts here in the hand. Get disciplined and don't play with your ego, the count is made at the end of the ...


1

I once spent an afternoon analyzing 7-2 with Poker Probe (An old program by Mike Caro). I was curious if there was any situation that justified making a call with 2-7. PP was a pretty simple program, you could run a hand against a configurable hand, or a number of random hands. It for example could tell you how often a particular hand would hold up against a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible