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8

I think this question is a little different than the usual question that needs the standard Best Five Cards answer. In this question, the nuance is whether player 2 gets any special consideration for having his 10 counterfeited. Does player 2 get some sort of bonus for being able to play both of his cards to make the best five-card hand, while player 1 could ...


7

I am going to ignore the bet amounts and your stack size first and give you a general answer, you have no fold equity anyway. Well in live, yes you can, there is nothing stopping you from physically turning your hand over and if you're all-in your hand cannot be made dead. However it is extremely bad etiquette. I have been a poker dealer for 3 years, ...


6

No, B folded. They are no longer in the hand. Cards are tabled, main pot of 75$ goes to A or C, depending on who has the best cards. If a side pot exists it goes to C.


6

The best five cards play, so the remaining players at showdown split the pot. In the case of a full house, if somebody has a better pair in their hand or make of 4 of a kind the best 5 card hand wins. If there are 4 of a kind on the board, the highest fifth card wins. I flopped a full house once. Nines full of sevens. I lost when the turn and river ...


6

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


5

That was the wrong way to do it. It should have been a split pot. They both had the same best five card hand.


5

Both players tie and should split the pot. They have the same poker hand as each other: KK77A When in doubt, just remember that poker hands are always five cards.


5

Tournaments are different from live play. Once the all-in bet is called, both hands must be turned face up immediately. Neither player is allowed to fold. Both hands are live, and remain face up while the rest of the cards are dealt.


4

General dead-button or forward-moving-button rules apply when three or more players remain. When you get down to two players, whoever most recently paid the big blind posts the small blind, the other player posts the big blind, and the button is moved under the small blind.


4

Common casino rules are these: Pots are split as evenly as possible down to the smallest betting unit of the game. In a typical small game, that's usually a $1 chip, but in some games it might be a $5 chip or even bigger. The "odd" chip(s) left over after everyone gets the maximum equal amount are distributed differently depending on the game being played. ...


4

In this case absolutely it's a misdeal from every place I've ever worked. But once every player has gotten a card the situations for a misdeal change. I have worked in some places that will call it a misdeal regardless of when a card is exposed during the deal, I.E. button's last card exposed, misdeal. Likewise I have worked in places where after every ...


4

This doesn't apply universally, but anywhere that uses the TDA rules would use this: 34: Misdeals A: Misdeals include but are not necessarily limited to: 1) 2 or more boxed cards on the initial deal; 2) first card dealt to the wrong seat; 3) cards dealt to a seat not entitled to a hand; 4) a seat entitled to a hand is dealt out; 5) In stud, if any ...


4

No matter the subsequent actions of player 1, as soon as player 2 folds, player 1 should be awarded the side pot, even if his cards are never seen by anyone. Player 3 should never, ever be awarded the side pot, since he didn't have enough money in the pot to earn that from the other players. He was all in for less than the others had, so he should never be ...


4

Assuming you're referring to No Limit Texas Holden, the answer is yes. Player No.2 can go all-in in that situation. To make things clear, Here are the three betting rules in no limit Texas Holden: Any player facing a bet at any stage of the hand can fold, call, raise, or go all in. Any player facing a check, or he's the first to act, can bet, go all in, ...


4

The standard casino rule is that the dealer is not supposed to count the pot for you. He may, however, "spread" the pot on request so that its contents are more visible and easier for a player to count (especially if there are buried high-value chips). An exception to this rule is if you pre-commit to a bet. For example "I bet the pot" or "I bet half the ...


4

Depends on the rules in use. Two common sets are Roberts rules and Tournament Directors Association (TDA) rules. From Roberts Rules: IRREGULARITIES: If the dealer prematurely deals any cards before the betting is complete, those cards will not play, even if a player who has not acted decides to fold. Also Section 5 (HOLD 'EM): If the ...


3

From Robert's Rules of Poker: "Deliberately acting out of turn will not be tolerated. A player who checks out of turn may not bet or raise on the next turn to act. A player who has called out of turn may not change his wager to a raise on the next turn to act. An action or verbal declaration out of turn is binding unless the action to that player is ...


3

I am a little confused about your described hand action. The fact that you use A, B, and C to denote players implies to me that they're acting in that alphabetical order. If A bets 1000 and B calls 1000, then C calls all-in for 500, there's no reason for A to fold, because he owes no additional money to stay in the hand. Can you please clarify that action? ...


3

No. Player 2 can either call by putting in 100 to match the big blind here, or he can raise to any amount 200 (100 big blind + 100) or more. Then players 3 and 4 will have their right to act, during which they can each opt to call, raise, or fold when the action is on them. A player going all-in for less than the blind doesn't eliminate those players' right ...


3

It seems quite plain to me that the sequence of events it crucial to resolving this situation. The fact that villains hands is mucked, and that a live hand is in play means Hero should be awarded the pot. It seems irrelevant to me that the Hero's four hole cards aren't all exposed. It also seems disingenuous that the game runner should award himself half ...


3

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have to be $70. There are a few places I've been with a house rule that an all-in of more than half the proper amount does constitute a raise, and so in one of those ...


3

Repeat after me: poker hands have five cards. EXACTLY five cards. No more, no fewer. In Hold'em, each player plays the best 5-card hand he can out of the seven available. Vlad's best 5-card hand is A-8-7-4-2 of clubs. His opponent's best 5-card hand is A-8-7-4-2 of clubs. Split pot. If, perchance, our hero had, say, the 6 of clubs in his hand, then his ...


3

Each player in a basic game of poker is given five cards to make their hand. There are variants to the game where players receive more then five cards and players have community cards. However it is the best five cards of a players hand that make their hand. If the best five cards you have, are not better then another players best five cards you loose the ...


3

The pot belongs to player 2, and he can claim it with his face-down cards. However, called hands may be shown on request, so if either player asks the dealer to show the other hand, he will (if it is retrievable). In this situation, it would generally be considered rude to ask. Also note that player 2 asks at his own risk--since he is the apparent winner, ...


3

Player three wins the money from the other players that match player three's money. In this case player three is going to get the main pot, which is seventy five. That is twenty five from player one, twenty five from player two and player three's original betting. Player one or two only wins the seventy five in the main pot if he can show down a better ...


3

The button is dead for the next hand. Easiest way for you to see is for me to show you an example. Table looks like this before player busts: Player 1 is button Player 2 is SB Player 3 is BB Player 4 Player 5 Table after Player 2 busts: Player1 Dead button is moved to where player 2 sat(you can just leave it with Player 1) Player 3 is SB Player 4 is ...


2

It sounds like you should just stop burning cards in home games since they cause grief without meaningfully affecting the game otherwise.


2

Not Sure if it breaks laws, but you could give paying customers an advantage by adding to their chip stacks if they buy products. As long as it's obvious to everyone of course. However, that may mean it's not neccesarily a "Freeroll" anymore. Ethically speaking, "weeding" out non buying customers from winning may amount to cheating on the poker providers ...


2

I own a poker tour in Colorado that specializes in "bar poker". I feel your pain in the sense of not wanting people who aren't spending money to win anything, but the way the law is interpreted in my state it's just a change you are going to have to take. As an owner, I don't want non-paying customers to win any more than the venue (bar) does. Generally if ...



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