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10

This is a tiny little chart I made for a few friends who are very new to the game and often can't get their head around how much of a difference one or two pips can make! Reading the chart: If your hand is unsuited, match your hole cards in the lower left half of the table. If your hand is suited, match your hole cards in the upper right half of the ...


5

There are quite a few things we need to address here. I'm going to do my best to break them down point-by-point. First off... AK is not favorite to win against so many players, is it really profitable in the long run? What should i look for in this 2 situations to decide if it's profitable on the long run? Should i consider play AQ as well in this ...


4

In the end, any formulaic starting hand strategy is going to suffer from major weaknesses due to the fact that it fails to make the proper adjustments for the specific players you are playing against. Chen's formula is no exception. If you're just starting out, this provides as good a strategy as any for giving you a place to start. It will point you in the ...


2

Having such a memorization mechanism that allows you to have a decent starting hand chart in your head is only going to help you in very very early stages of learning the game. There are a lot of books and poker strategy websites where such charts can be found. I've noticed that those charts encourage you to play your hand if it's strong (medium to big ...


2

I generally will fold unless there is no bet to call. Investing in a bad hand generally gets you a negative return. If there is no bet to call in the big blind or it's an ante game, I would hold the highest ranks in the following: suited with a high card A♣5♣ before K♥ 6♥ suited connectors 7⋄ 6⋄ before ...


1

Putting any money in whatsoever constitutes "playing" the hand in this context. If you call a blind, bet, or raise, you are playing the hand. If you fold, you are not playing the hand. If you are the big blind and there are no bets, raises, straddles, or other additions of money beyond the blinds -- so you do not have to add any money to see the flop -- ...


1

Here's one way that it might have been derived - this won't be the exact method, but it might have been a jumping off point for Chen. First, take the Sklansky hand groupings - take it as given that this is what the Chen formula is trying to reproduce. Then produce a table of grouping for each hand, against a set of features that that hand might have (e.g. ...


1

I have been playing FL! 5 card draw for about 2-3 months. For FL, I would generally keep Ace or King. I was profitable at 0.2-0.5 level at that time, which was the highest level with more then 2 tables open at that time. (And propably also now...) In NL, I think just throwing away these cards can't be a big mistake, but I have no experience from that.


1

The Sklansky hand rating is also inclusive of post flop playability and implied odds. A simply equity calculation would render T8o better then 89s. This clearly isn't the case though. You have to consider how the hand flops relative to villain range, and it's post flop playability. Do not base hand ranking on pure jam equity because you will be ignoring too ...


1

Chen's formula is limited in the way that any formula is - as said above it doesn't take account of who you're playing against. Also, though, it has major flaws in logic (why under connectedness would Ace not count as high or low? Why would you get a bonus for making a straight with community cards higher than your hole cards, but not with community lower ...


1

Well, I will separate the answer to 3 parts: many players treat very low stacks table the way you treat "play money" tables. They just don't care. I believe you see many showdowns and all-ins. Its really hard to consider an action as good or bad in such situations. In many cases the one with the best hand pre-flop find himself loosing at the end ...



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