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25

In limit games, the only raise amount allowed is the big blind during preflop and flop play; double the big blind during turn and river play. The correct minimum raise in big bet games (no limit and pot limit) is to increase the amount of the bet by the amount of the previous bet (e.g. double the previous raise*), or to raise all-in if you do not have ...


16

In all poker hands not only the highest card determinates the better hand, all cards do. The best five card hand you can form is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: 8:diamonds: 6:diamonds: 2:diamonds: (which is the board). The best hand your opponent can form however is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: T:diamonds: 9:diamonds: 8:diamonds: So, while you both have the King and ...


14

If you are playing a 5 card game (like Hold-Em) then only the top 5 cards play. So, in this case, there are 4 on the table (6-9) and you each have a 10, for the best possible hand a 6-10 straight. It is also possible that you have AA, and friend KK, but the board comes out 3-4-5-6-7 and you split as you both play the best hand - the board.


13

The general rule of thumb from me would be to stick with the same raise you would make in the same situation with T9s. You want to balance your range so that you get a good mix of action with your great hands and folds with your steals. What that raise should be will depend a lot on your history with the blinds and on their stack sizes. Whether we are ...


13

The standard straddle is, in general, a losing proposition. You're trading 2BB for the right to play last preflop. You'll end up playing larger pots out of position, which is a bad thing. You have to have a huge edge against your opposition to make up for the positional disadvantage. Some special situations, where straddling makes sense: Trying to build ...


11

I think the only realistic options for villain are a missed draw or Tx. I think he'd have gotten more aggressive earlier if he had you preflop. Your line looks a lot like an overpair to me, and as such, he would want to get value out of you if he had trips or a full house. As such, I don't think he shoves the river here if he wanted a call. He knows you ...


11

Please, before you continue reading and make any decisions based on what I'm about to tell you, you must understand two important things: I'm not a lawyer. I can't even say that I dabble in law. I'm not an expert on these matters, and many people who are expert disagree with one another. As simple as your question may seem, it is not easy to answer. ...


10

Because the 555 are not just 555, it's a full house (fives full of queens). Elezra only has QQQ. In Hold'em you have to make the best five cards out of seven: using either 0, 1 or 2 of your holecards and either 3, 4 or 5 community cards. In the deal you linked to the community cards are: 3⋄5♠Q♠Q♣J♥ The best hand Eli ...


10

This is a tiny little chart I made for a few friends who are very new to the game and often can't get their head around how much of a difference one or two pips can make! Reading the chart: If your hand is unsuited, match your hole cards in the lower left half of the table. If your hand is suited, match your hole cards in the upper right half of the ...


10

My standard raise in this spot preflop would be something like $84. With reads that villains are bad (i.e. will call 3bets like this way too often) that number becomes bigger. So $110 probably isn't a bad raise size, but you should realize that you're putting in 1/3 of effective stacks and you really don't want to play postflop when that's the case. Under ...


10

I have a friend who often relates a similar story to me. (The friend is not me, but has been in the past!) As always, as detailed as this is, it's never the whole story. My friend will be playing and winning at a reasonable rate, then the reverse... at a reasonable rate. When they're winning they often attribute it to the quality of their ability, and when ...


9

Against a full table of random hands, AA will win under 30% of the time. Against any individual random hand, AA will win 85% of the time. Presumably, your tournament featured full tables. That means that if you play the hand in a way that keeps too many opponents in the hand, you are going to lose very frequently. In the long run, it will be slightly less ...


9

After the flop you've seen 4 cards of your suit, and 1 of another suit. This leaves 9 cards of your suit, and 38 of a different suit; your odds of completing your flush on the turn are thus 9/47, or 19.14%. If the flop hasn't completed your flush, your odds of completing it on the river are 9/46, or 19.5%. This means that the total odds for completing a ...


9

Your second question is unanswerable. Estimating what the mix of styles in a tournament will be on average is too inflexible an assumption for any strategic use. Your first question is more interesting and problematic. Can we play small-ball poker in a cash-game? Yes, but it takes far greater personal involvement from the player, and frankly doesn't lead to ...


9

Using PP's solely to flop sets isn't a winning strategy. (note: I'll stick to talking about open-betting pre-flop and not cold-calling which leads to similar post-flop situations, but infers different ranges for all players involved. Also, I consider small PP's 22-88; mid PP's 99-TT; and big PP's to be JJ-AA. JJ is a special case. Closer to being a mid ...


9

I am not a lawyer. What follows is my understanding of the facts, having been involved in the online poker industry since 2004: Summary: With the exception of a few states, no law is on the books to make online poker illegal. This means that it is legal in most areas of the United States. In the United States, our legal system operates on the concept of ...


9

The big four are definitely: Theory of Poker by David Sklansky - perhaps the best book for establishing an understanding of poker theory in general. This one is worthwhile no matter what poker game you're into. Super System compiled by Doyle Brunson - between this and its sequel, you can get a good ground-level understanding of any game. It's not something ...


9

If they are beginners, their play is completely haotic and makes absolutely no sense. In a weird and ironic way, this makes such players somewhat dangerous... I see this all the time if I play online and enter a tournament that has virtual money as entry fee (yeah, I still do that). In such tournaments, people often go all-in in the absolute first hand with ...


9

Theoretically, no. For every dollar you and your opponent add to the pot, you stand to win your dollar back plus some of his, regardless of his hand. However there are a few practical edge-cases worth considering. Trusting the game If this is your first time playing in a home game, there are a few ways this could be a mistake. The first is cheating; ...


8

First, a look at ranges: I think he has AA/KK/Tx/88/33 here no more often than he has JJ or a busted draw (to the straight or the flush). And sometimes he'll turn up with utter crap. So if we say it's an even money bet, we're getting good odds on a call. Second, let's look at history: You noted in the comments that Villian has not let a pot check around. ...


8

I'm iffy about your flop bet-size. There are not many hands that you are worse than even-money with on that board. Represent the strength that you have so that your decisions later in the hand are easier. A half pot bet looks like you are just c-betting to c-bet. Honestly, I prefer either a larger bet to maintain control of the hand, or a similar bet to ...


8

Honestly, I think that small ball strategy is significantly more effective in cash games. Many of the benefits it provides center around people adjusting to your image. In tournaments, that can all go down the drain when players are moved to different tables. By contrast, in cash games you are much more likely to play a large number of hands against the same ...


8

Unless explicitly noted, poker hands are only 5 cards. If you have 7 cards to choose from, you make the best 5 card hand you can, and the other 2 don't count. Your best possible hand in that situation was 6 7 8 9 T. Your friend's best possible hand was 6 7 8 9 T. Since they were the same, you tied and split the pot.


8

There have been several posts already here explaining how to compute side-pots (note that the subject of penalty blinds has not been dealt with but that is another topic). Here's one such topic: How are side pots built? Question. Is the ratio against the total pot... or the other winners? Is this correct? Get a ratio compared to others? The ...


8

I believe this to be a very complicated set of factors... I'll try to mention a few, but not all of them, since I'm not old enough to know them :D. First of all, Texas Hold'em is the variation of poker with the easiest mechanics to understand. All others are a bit more complicated: in Omaha there are too many cards, in Stud games there are those weird ...


7

The rule of thumb I've always heard is that tournaments tend to end when there are around 10 big blinds left on the table. You will need to know the number of players you will have, your starting blind level and stack size, and your desired tournament length. Generally, you will not want to start with deep stacks for a short tournament. The final blind ...


7

Annette Obrestad did this a few years ago. A quick google search finds an article where she discusses her win and a youtube video of the tournament she played: http://www.bluffeurope.com/interview/en/Annette-Obrestad-Eyes-Wide-Shut_3379.aspx http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dax6w3RgDWA


7

First, $110 is too much. $70 (~6 times more than the initial raise) would be enough here to make other players fold their hands (obviously, they are trying to catch something with Axs, small connectors, small pairs, etc. - it's hard to call 3bet for them here). KK is a good hand but it seems like hero is so afraid of losing with this hand, so he can't play ...


7

Check raising can be used to punish people who auto-bet in position too often. It's also good for semi-bluffing or building a pot when you've got a made hand vs normal betting frequencies. It's part of a balanced strategy. If every time you have a hand you donk and every time you check you either check-call or check-fold then your opponents can take ...


7

Open Limp: When the first player enters the pot by limping in. Explained When a player is first to enter the pot and simply limps they are making a call of the big blind. This is generally considered to be a weak-passive play typified by beginning poker players. Example The small blind is $5 and the big blind is $10 in a live poker game. The first two ...



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