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5

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


4

Yes this is a split, since you always count the 5 best cards out of board cards + hand cards. you would have a street from board and your other 2 cards don't care if they don't help to upgrade that street. IF you had a king, you would have won here.


4

It depends on a lot of things. The first thing to consider regardless of your cards is how well do you manage your bankroll ? If you are playing for all the money you have in your life then the answer is easy here... Even with AA you should fold, and you should leave the table and play some lower stakes. Even if the math shows a positive expected value you ...


3

Well, IMHO, your analysis is pretty good. However, you see this kind of play all the time even in big tournaments. And in general, this play from the A8 is usually not a bad one. Whenever you have a super-short stack (really anything under 10 BBs) then they are capable of pushing with just about anything. In fact, there comes a time that it just doesn't ...


3

The answer to this question addresses the 100 hands before you got your AA, not the AA itself. If you get AA, then usually cram and press pre-flop. Unless, of course, you feel unusually lucky and feel like playing a subtle hand and try to outplay your opponents - good luck. As Doyle Brunson put it, AA is a great way to win a small pot or loose a big one. ...


3

Yes, definitely go all-in. Most people go all-in pre-flop with hands way worse than KK, e.g., AK, AQ, QQ, JJ. And statistically speaking, KK is only worse than AA, so you should definitely go all-in.


2

This is a very rough estimation based on this year. 35 levels passed = 70 hours of play. If they played 20 hands an hour this makes 1400 hands. For the last 5 years the number of players is roughly the same so I would guess the number of hands should be similar.


1

According to Sklansky, in this situation, you should play only with AA, KK, QQ, and AK suited. I might add a couple more; AK off, and AQ suited. The reason is (in limit), AA and KK only cover the "blinds." Your (marginal) wins (under Sklansky) come from AK suited and QQ. Hence, I would extend the hands to AK off, and AQ suited, whose expectation is nearly ...


1

If in doubt, call. But there is one situation where there is "no doubt" and you should fold. I disagree with others about the TAG (tight aggressive player). This person may have AA, but may also have AK or QQ. Against this "range," you are a favorite but will sometimes lose to AA. Weaker players will have wider ranges and greater losing frequencies. The ...


1

110$. 70 + 40. 70 is the last total amount, 40 is the last legal raise amount. 100$. 70 + 30. 70 is the last total amount, 30 is the last legal raise amount. Obviously a min 4bet is stupid here, but it is still a legal raise.


1

Personally, I'm limping 9 times out of 10 in this specific situation, depending on my table image and my history with those players. Such a wasted opportunity to push them out most of the time. Give them 4 chances to bluff or catch a decent but worse hand, and if they don't and you min-bet the river and turn over Aces, everybody will be wondering why you ...


1

These are all great answers. I use one of two strategies in this situation. I will always raise, it's just a matter of how much. The only time I don't raise pre-flop with AA is when I'm early in position and I know there is a wild canon to my left and I can come over the top. So I'm guessing the situation is that only the SB and BB remain to your left. ...



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