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12

OK, so you have: Board: 3⋄ 9♠ A♠ 4♠ 8♠ Player 1: Q♠ 9⋄ Player 2: K♠ J⋄ Player 3: Q♣ 5♠ Well, combining the 5 best cards, each player will have: Player 1: A flush: A♠ Q♠ 9♠ 8♠ 4♠ Player 2: A flush: A♠ K♠ 9♠ 8♠ ...


8

This is called "rabbit hunting," or just "rabbiting." Many casinos and card rooms explicitly prohibit it in their "rules and regulations" document (example). If you want to try your luck with asking individual dealers to bend the rules... well, do so at your own risk. For home games, there's no single definitive rule about whether rabbiting is allowed or ...


7

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


7

The odds of getting aces do not at all depend on the number of cards remaining in the deck. They depend solely on the number of cards in the deck (52), how many aces are in the deck (4), and how many cards you receive from that deck (2 in holdem). You have a 4 in 52 (or 1 in 13) chance to get an initial ace. If you get that first ace, you then have a 3 in ...


7

I am going to ignore the bet amounts and your stack size first and give you a general answer, you have no fold equity anyway. Well in live, yes you can, there is nothing stopping you from physically turning your hand over and if you're all-in your hand cannot be made dead. However it is extremely bad etiquette. I have been a poker dealer for 3 years, ...


6

Focus on playing hands that have polarized showdown value. High flush draws and pocket pairs (preflop) are good examples. Basically, against passive callers, the difficulty is that you don't gain information about what they have during the hand, so you have to play only hands where you can be sure you're either leading or losing with high certainty, and ...


6

Comparing flush vs flush is exactly the same principle as comparing a high-card hand vs another high-card hand. The flush that has the bigger highest card wins. If they are the same, compare the 2nd highest cards in each flush, and so on. In your case, player 2's J9862 beats player 1's J9532, because the 3rd highest card of player 2's flush is better. This ...


6

No. The player with KQ would win the whole pot. The winner of the pot is the player who can make the best 5-card hand from the 7 possible cards -- 5 board cards plus their two hole cards. Player 1 has KQ, so his 7 cards are KKKQ642. Ignoring suits, the best possible hand here is KKKQ6, or trip kings with a queen kicker. Player 2 has K9, so his 7 cards ...


6

As @Chris said, this greatly depends on your stack. In addition, you don't say if you're playing cash or a tournament. At the moment you only have a 6 pair as a made hand. This may be sufficient or may not depending on your stacks. If you are playing a tournament and you're desperately low, say having 10-15 blinds, then shoving here is never a bad play. ...


6

No, B folded. They are no longer in the hand. Cards are tabled, main pot of 75$ goes to A or C, depending on who has the best cards. If a side pot exists it goes to C.


6

Five best cards win. Your five best cards would be TT222, hence indeed you have a full house which beats his TT66J hand. Best five cards is always best five cards for the player holding the hand!


6

The best five cards play, so the remaining players at showdown split the pot. In the case of a full house, if somebody has a better pair in their hand or make of 4 of a kind the best 5 card hand wins. If there are 4 of a kind on the board, the highest fifth card wins. I flopped a full house once. Nines full of sevens. I lost when the turn and river ...


6

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


5

In the example you give both players have 1 pair. Poker is the best 5 card hand. Your best hand would be 2,2,A,Q,6 your opponents best hand would be 2,2,A,Q,7. Therefore his 7 would "out kick" your 6. However, if the board was 2,2,3,3,Q You both would share the best hand 2,2,3,3,A and the pot would therefore be split


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


5

I think this question lacks a lot of context. It matters whether you're in a raised or three-bet pot. It matters who raised. It matters whether your hand is the unassailable nuts or whether draws exist. And whether redraws exist for you in the event that your opponent's good fortune usurps your hand. It matters whether you're in position relative to your ...


5

The dealer made a mistake here. If asked to show a hand, the dealer should ask the player if he exposed it, of otherwise try to determine if it was in fact exposed, perhaps enlisting the assistance of the floorman, but should not simply trust the players who asked. In this case you bet, the other player folded, so the hand is over. If you intentionally show ...


5

Such things are entirely at the discretion of the floorman/tournament director. In a situation as obvious as you describe, I would certainly penalize both players with time away from the table. I am less inclined to return chips or otherwise change the outcome of the hand itself unless I was totally convinced that the player would never have acted that way ...


5

There are 2598960 unique 5-card poker hands (C(n,r) = C(52, 5) = 2598960). 4 of those are royal flushes. So, the odds of one specific player flopping a royal flush would be 4-in-2598960, or 1-in-649740.


5

You lost because your opponent had a flush. If he did not have a flush, then you didn't lose. If neither of you had a flush, you tied, both with the same hand: AAJJ9


5

In general to calculate your percentage of hitting you can do the following: Count your outs. In your case: 13 cards of your suit minus the 4 you already see make 9 cards in the deck which will make your flush. Calculate the amount of cards left. Since we can not know the cards of our opponents, we include them in our calculation. Hence there are 52 -2 ...


5

But even a call to a raise in early position is not a cheap flop. 2BB is 2BB and you have 4 players behind you that could re-raise. K-10 suited is not just outside the tight range in early position. That is a very loose call. That is only a calling hand in late position. That hand only wins 25% against 5 random hands. When do you raise? Build a big ...


4

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


4

This question is considered by way to many players as relevant to building a bankroll. What you are winning or losing in any particular session has nothing to do with your expectation. One is going to have rushes and bad runs. These things even out. What the important thing to keep in mind is that you want to play winning poker for as many hours as you can. ...


4

Note 1 in the article on Hold'em Odds elaborates on this a bit further: [Note 1] By removing reflection and applying aggressive search tree pruning, it is possible to reduce the number of unique head-to-head hand combinations from 207,025 to 47,008. Reflection eliminates redundant calculations by observing that given hands h_1 and h_2, if w_1 is the ...


4

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


4

Your call preflop was good as you had the desired multi-way pot for set-mining. What i don't like is the donk bet against 3 opponents. These types of bets against multiple opponents are showing great strength, exactly what you don't wish to show right now! Give the aggressor a chance to C-bet this pot and some others to call. C-bets are more easily called ...


4

In real poker tournaments, when the lowest denomination chip is no longer needed, they chip-up all they can and then have a chip "race" for the odd ones. Cards are dealt in such a way that each odd chip has a 1/N chance of becoming the next larger chip, where N is the ratio of the larger chip to the smaller. That way, the total of chips in play stays the ...


4

As I am not allowed to comment below 50 reputation I have to post an answer. I mostly agree with the points of Yang. I would consider playing a Tight Agrgressive (TAG) style of Play as the best optpion here. The general guideline of poker is to maximize your wins and minimize your losses. Meaning to extract the most possible value if you're ahead with smth. ...



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