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10

K7 steals one winner from A2 K7 wins 3456 and K8 does not K8 does not steal 4567 as A2 does not have a piece of it


7

I am going to ignore the bet amounts and your stack size first and give you a general answer, you have no fold equity anyway. Well in live, yes you can, there is nothing stopping you from physically turning your hand over and if you're all-in your hand cannot be made dead. However it is extremely bad etiquette. I have been a poker dealer for 3 years, ...


7

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


6

No. The player with KQ would win the whole pot. The winner of the pot is the player who can make the best 5-card hand from the 7 possible cards -- 5 board cards plus their two hole cards. Player 1 has KQ, so his 7 cards are KKKQ642. Ignoring suits, the best possible hand here is KKKQ6, or trip kings with a queen kicker. Player 2 has K9, so his 7 cards ...


6

No, B folded. They are no longer in the hand. Cards are tabled, main pot of 75$ goes to A or C, depending on who has the best cards. If a side pot exists it goes to C.


6

Five best cards win. Your five best cards would be TT222, hence indeed you have a full house which beats his TT66J hand. Best five cards is always best five cards for the player holding the hand!


6

The best five cards play, so the remaining players at showdown split the pot. In the case of a full house, if somebody has a better pair in their hand or make of 4 of a kind the best 5 card hand wins. If there are 4 of a kind on the board, the highest fifth card wins. I flopped a full house once. Nines full of sevens. I lost when the turn and river ...


6

You didn't specify suits so I'm assuming there aren't any flushes or straight flushes. Best hand Player 1 can make out of his hand and the board is: A Q Q 10 10, or two pair (Qs and 10s) Best hand Player 2 can make out of his hand and the board is: A A 7 7 Q, or two pair (Aces and sevens). Player 2 wins with the higher two pair (Aces beat Queens).


5

I think this question lacks a lot of context. It matters whether you're in a raised or three-bet pot. It matters who raised. It matters whether your hand is the unassailable nuts or whether draws exist. And whether redraws exist for you in the event that your opponent's good fortune usurps your hand. It matters whether you're in position relative to your ...


5

The dealer made a mistake here. If asked to show a hand, the dealer should ask the player if he exposed it, of otherwise try to determine if it was in fact exposed, perhaps enlisting the assistance of the floorman, but should not simply trust the players who asked. In this case you bet, the other player folded, so the hand is over. If you intentionally show ...


5

Such things are entirely at the discretion of the floorman/tournament director. In a situation as obvious as you describe, I would certainly penalize both players with time away from the table. I am less inclined to return chips or otherwise change the outcome of the hand itself unless I was totally convinced that the player would never have acted that way ...


5

There are 2598960 unique 5-card poker hands (C(n,r) = C(52, 5) = 2598960). 4 of those are royal flushes. So, the odds of one specific player flopping a royal flush would be 4-in-2598960, or 1-in-649740.


5

You lost because your opponent had a flush. If he did not have a flush, then you didn't lose. If neither of you had a flush, you tied, both with the same hand: AAJJ9


5

In general to calculate your percentage of hitting you can do the following: Count your outs. In your case: 13 cards of your suit minus the 4 you already see make 9 cards in the deck which will make your flush. Calculate the amount of cards left. Since we can not know the cards of our opponents, we include them in our calculation. Hence there are 52 -2 (...


5

But even a call to a raise in early position is not a cheap flop. 2BB is 2BB and you have 4 players behind you that could re-raise. K-10 suited is not just outside the tight range in early position. That is a very loose call. That is only a calling hand in late position. That hand only wins 25% against 5 random hands. When do you raise? Build a big ...


4

There are a lot of questions outstanding in this, but a couple of things jump out at me. It's a micro-limit play money game - people will play anything Your raise to 2x BB with multiple limpers is WAY too small. It's too small of a raise to be considered a raise, really, even in a big real-money cash game. The pot-odds almost dictate that the other ...


4

When he was bluffing or weak he only broke open the Oreo, but didn't eat them. When he had the best hand or was strong he'd eat the Oreo. Basically he was rewarding himself with a cookie when he made the best hand or was very strong. Also there are a bunch of other tells from the first scene where Mike and KGB play. They're constantly talking trying to act ...


4

In this case absolutely it's a misdeal from every place I've ever worked. But once every player has gotten a card the situations for a misdeal change. I have worked in some places that will call it a misdeal regardless of when a card is exposed during the deal, I.E. button's last card exposed, misdeal. Likewise I have worked in places where after every ...


4

This doesn't apply universally, but anywhere that uses the TDA rules would use this: 34: Misdeals A: Misdeals include but are not necessarily limited to: 1) 2 or more boxed cards on the initial deal; 2) first card dealt to the wrong seat; 3) cards dealt to a seat not entitled to a hand; 4) a seat entitled to a hand is dealt out; 5) In stud, if any ...


4

No matter the subsequent actions of player 1, as soon as player 2 folds, player 1 should be awarded the side pot, even if his cards are never seen by anyone. Player 3 should never, ever be awarded the side pot, since he didn't have enough money in the pot to earn that from the other players. He was all in for less than the others had, so he should never be ...


4

My initial reaction when reading this hand was that a push was the easy play. After thinking about it a little, I'm not sure that it's so clear. Make no mistake, a push is absolutely a good, profitable play, but maybe just calling is better for the following reason: given his range, (which btw, I think is too tight--you shouldn't ever totally discount ...


4

Depends on the rules in use. Two common sets are Roberts rules and Tournament Directors Association (TDA) rules. From Roberts Rules: IRREGULARITIES: If the dealer prematurely deals any cards before the betting is complete, those cards will not play, even if a player who has not acted decides to fold. Also Section 5 (HOLD 'EM): If the ...


3

Some casinos have a betting line on the table or other house rules that may differ from the norm. But generally, a player in turn is bound by his first action, whether verbal or by movement of chips. A player may count or assemble chips immediately in front of his stack, but if he makes a forward betting motion with chips in hand, that is a binding bet. In ...


3

The Big Game. (PokerStars) extra characters


3

Yes. And be careful, a friend lost a large pot at a casino this way. He held A9 against KK all in, and paired his ace on the river. The opponent was trash talking, and in the heat of the moment my friend mucked his 9 (since it wasn't needed to make his hand), tabling just the Ace to demonstrate his win. But the opponent objected, and the floor ...


3

As you and others have pointed out, there's a myriad of factors to consider in this situation (as in every hand), so I'll share some real general tips. The nice thing about flopping an unbeatable hand or practically unbeatable hand is that you no longer have to worry about your cards, improving your hand, pot odds or any of that--you're free to turn 100% of ...


3

Interesting, tough hand. I think I would fold here. I'll assume there isn't any relevant history with the opponent as that may change your strategy here. I think everything is pretty straightforward up until the flop where you are faced with the check-raise. I think a call here is good, but I'm uneasy about it as it doesn't lead to the rest of the hand ...


3

From Robert's Rules of Poker: "Deliberately acting out of turn will not be tolerated. A player who checks out of turn may not bet or raise on the next turn to act. A player who has called out of turn may not change his wager to a raise on the next turn to act. An action or verbal declaration out of turn is binding unless the action to that player is ...



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