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16

In all poker hands not only the highest card determinates the better hand, all cards do. The best five card hand you can form is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: 8:diamonds: 6:diamonds: 2:diamonds: (which is the board). The best hand your opponent can form however is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: T:diamonds: 9:diamonds: 8:diamonds: So, while you both have the King and ...


10

I have a friend who often relates a similar story to me. (The friend is not me, but has been in the past!) As always, as detailed as this is, it's never the whole story. My friend will be playing and winning at a reasonable rate, then the reverse... at a reasonable rate. When they're winning they often attribute it to the quality of their ability, and when ...


7

Check raising can be used to punish people who auto-bet in position too often. It's also good for semi-bluffing or building a pot when you've got a made hand vs normal betting frequencies. It's part of a balanced strategy. If every time you have a hand you donk and every time you check you either check-call or check-fold then your opponents can take ...


7

Open Limp: When the first player enters the pot by limping in. Explained When a player is first to enter the pot and simply limps they are making a call of the big blind. This is generally considered to be a weak-passive play typified by beginning poker players. Example The small blind is $5 and the big blind is $10 in a live poker game. The first two ...


6

Your preflop actions look fine. You have the second best starting hand in poker, so 4betting strongly is correct. The 3-5-6 rainbow flop is coordinated, but you worrying about hands like 2-4 and 4-7 is just silly. Think about it: would you call a 4-bet preflop with this kind of hand? Probably not unless you were super deepstacked (which you didn't mention, ...


6

I don't think you will find any "official" rules about this situation because in most "official" poker tournaments/cash games the players do not deal themselves anyway. It would be a bad idea to skip his deal because, as you already pointed out, this would disturb the seating positions. Just have someone deal for him - in the right order of course ...


5

I think the biggest mistake here is not raising pre-flop. With three people in the hand and AQ out of position I think this has to be a raise, relating to some comments that I read I would be raising here 100% of the time, I don't think playing AQ out of position is great (obviously you play it, it's a monster) and so narrowing the field would be the first ...


5

As you can imagine, your equity in a heads up hand with no rake, where you bet preflop and deal out all community cards without betting, will be 50%. Other variations of this, such as the dealer winning ties or the introduction of a rake, will lower your equity (and since this is a casino game, I'm willing to bet that they have something in their favor). ...


5

The books I have read by professional poker players discuss the check raise as part of a balanced strategy and discuss its use. The authors specifically point out that is perfectly acceptable. I surmise that those who object simply don't like having to cope with this particular tactic. If its a game among family or friends and someone objects, you might ...


5

The rule is: The cards must be shown in the case of all-in when there are no more possible moves (fold/check/bet/raise) to be made by any of the players that are in the hand. Now, this happens when: all the chips of the participanting players are in the pot there is only player in the hand that has chips. This is so because, since he's the only one left ...


5

You also have to take into account whether you are playing a tournament or Cashgame. For tournaments, the ruling is as described by Radu Murzea In Cashgames, there is usually no showdown until the river is dealt. The player who has gone all in has to show his cards first. The player who called can then still muck his cards if he cannot beat his opponents ...


5

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old poker adage: "You ...


4

I would definitely raise PF to see where I am. If you dont raise you allow trash to see the flop and secondly you have no idea if your AQ is the strongest A. If you are re-raised you can tighten your villains range PF without second guessing OTF. That alone puts you in a tough spot OTF. I would much prefer to be re-raised and knowing where I am. As someone ...


4

Depends on many factors. Like if you have any history on these players and how they play. Personally I would have raised pre with that hand to at least get rid of any silly hands for the big blind. He could be sat there with 2 7 for all you know. But back to the actual question. I would say that you have the strongest Ace. I would expect anyone else to ...


4

Your QQ hand has the greatest value before the flop because it is 1) a made pair and 2) a high one. Once the rocket comes on the flop, your hand loses most of its value, and you should check and fold (calling occasionally to keep people honest) if the rocket comes on the flop, and someone bets. Most people will stay in preflop with A-x. If you are first to ...


4

Hold'em Poker means having the 5 best cards available, your hand + board, and her hand + board. You both made a straight, doesn't matter what u have left over. This setup is a split pot, i guess u mixed something up. She probably had 10 and Ace or Ace Queen or Ace King for a Full House, which beats a straight.


4

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...


4

Should Hero have called villain's pre-flop raise, re-raised, or folded? The only thing you can do is call. You've labelled Villian as tight-aggressive and he's made a small reraise after you've opened under the gun. This is a fairly strong sign of strength. Let's look at your options: Jamming: KQs is doing badly against the average TAG players range in ...


3

Your "40% Strategy" label is a bit misleading. Often, aggressive strategies do well by making the opponent fold frequently. If you have a 40% hand, it's often very good to make your opponent fold! I take it that the spirit of your question is to ask what makes such strategies work, when to employ them, and whether people often do employ them. What makes ...


3

You have an interesting point of view about the short stacks, but this point tells me that you lack a few key things about short stack play. As you might know, in cash games, the blinds never increase. As you might know as well, in cash games you can buy in for any amount which is between two fixed amounts, set by the casino. However, in cash games the pots ...


3

The best way to deal with them in my opinion is to only call them with hands that have a good chance of winning a showdown. So any pair, any connectors, any suited cards preferably with a high kicker. If you act before them and have a decent hand, put in big raises to try and stop them shoving, if they do call then you hopefully chip up nicely :)


3

Checking in the dark is a high level play to reestablish position on the flop. Like someone else already mentioned, most of the time this is done with drawing hands, as someone with vulnerable hands like AA/KK would most likely never make this move. It is essentially a way of giving away less information regarding your hand and how it relates to the flop. ...


3

If you're playing a Zoom table where you don't necessarily get to pick up on the tendencies of other players, always try to take into account what the rest of the board looks like. For example, when the flop comes A-X-X, do the XX cards give a possible straight/flush draw? If the board is A-9-8 with two clubs and you're getting action, its likely the ...


3

Poker is a game about ranges. As such, there is no cookie-cutter answer to questions like this. You want to figure out the range of villain, and figure out how best to play against it. For example, if you opened in UTG and villain called from UTG+1 and he does this with a range of {AQ+,JJ-99} then it's probably best simply to check/fold on the flop: he has ...


3

I remember reading on pocket fives a long time ago that you will want one extra buyin, beyond the typical recommendation of 25-40 buyins, for each additional table that you will be playing. 20 buyins is a little on the low side unless you can afford to replace it if you go broke. If you start with 40 buyins, the chance of going broke (assuming that you are ...


3

This has to do with the fact that late-position players in a poker hand have an advantage, having seen what early position players did, or didn't do. A check raise represents an attempt by an early position player to reverse the order. That is, he will wait for the late position player to bet first, before showing his strength. If a player never check ...


3

It's not just home games that view check-raising as "pejorative" as you say. Most of the lowball games spread in Southern California flat-out banned check-raising. The other answers are generally correct... the reasons you would check-raise are the same as why you would bet out. Sometimes, though, check-raising makes a lot more sense than just betting out ...


3

An open limp is the first one that just pays the bigblind instead of raising. In most cases it is a weak gameplay because... ... if you've a good hand, you got to protect it and raise instead of just limping. ... if you've a worse hand, your get rid of it and not waste chips for it. Because it tells everyone on the table that you got a "ok"-hand, not ...


3

Someone who "open limps" is someone who DOESN'T raise with a very strong hand such as AA, but just calls "limps." He's hoping that someone behind him will raise with a "strong" (but weaker) hand, such as KK, QQ, or AK, so he can re-raise. This is a good tactic if there are a number of people at the table who will raise with a lot of hands, including some ...


3

I have to go against the flow on this one. I dont think you played it fine. I have not palyed the specific tournament and am not aware of the table dynamics at the given point but raising 2.5bb vs 2 limpers is not really ok in my opinion. Against 2 limpers you need to raise more (at least 3.5-4bb I think) in order to have fold equity. Since JQs is not an ...



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