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0

The rulings on this particular thing vary according to where you play. Some places let you show your cards in a hand to another player only if you are head up. Others do not and in particular this is generally not allowed in tournaments. The way you describe this incident most places would rule this hand dead. The problem is the player as you said "threw ...


2

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


0

Absolutely. As you say, if you bet your bluffs big and your value bets small, you have exploitable bet sizing tells. You fix this by 'balancing your range' - essentially being capable of any one play with both a good hand and a bad hand. This way none of your bets 'polarise' your range so good players find it more difficult to put you on a hand, allowing ...


0

This is a dilemma. The thing is most players mix up their betting patterns. If your always betting particular hands one way, players pick up on this and react accordingly, usually having a negative effect on your bottom line. There is a best way to play every hand, but it is not as simple of an equation as it seems. When you call, what you call with, when ...


3

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

Why did you play a hand like this junk in the first place and especially against an aggressive player which you know well keep betting? The probability to hit a flush draw on the flop is about the same as to hit a set (around 11%), although when you're planning to do this with rubbish hand as 95s you need to enter and see the flop cheaply and as much ...


1

His holding looks suspiciously like Tx9x (draw from the flop) rather 2 diamonds that he elected to call on the flop. The only play suited for this would be A⋄J⋄, since both K and Q were on the board. You can't expect a nitty/passive guy with A⋄T⋄ to donkbet you on this flop. He has something strong and his 21/0 shows that. ...


2

I do not know if you call, I do know that you do not automatically fold. The majority of boards in hold'em like this have cards that are connected enough and suited enough for someone to hold a hand better then yours. What it really boils down to is the dynamics between you and the other player that will dictate rather or not you should call. Besides the ...


0

When I read your question, I thought you were saying "the board is showing QQ33x and a particular player is holding 77 in the pocket." If that interpretation is correct, then yes, the queens and sevens two pair would beat the queens and threes two pair. When multiple players have two pair and the higher pair is the same, the lower pair is used as the ...


0

Its a split pot 9944X. You make the best 5 card hand you can, using 0, 1 or both of your pocket cards, and correspondingly 5, 4 or 3 community cards. So does your opponent. In this example you both come up with numerically equivalent hands, so the pot is split.


1

Assuming you mean the community cards were something like K♥K♠4♥4⋄J♣ with player 1 having say Q⋄7♥ and player 2 Q♣3♣ then its a split pot, winning hands being KK44Q.


5

In the example you give both players have 1 pair. Poker is the best 5 card hand. Your best hand would be 2,2,A,Q,6 your opponents best hand would be 2,2,A,Q,7. Therefore his 7 would "out kick" your 6. However, if the board was 2,2,3,3,Q You both would share the best hand 2,2,3,3,A and the pot would therefore be split


1

Zeb, this question just might get closed, because if your wondering why you get bad beats at the river is not really an answerable question. Everyone gets bad beats, and you are no exception. You might however get more bad beats then average and it might seem to you that you are getting more bad beats. This may be because of the way you think, and the way ...


4

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


3

First of all, it seems you were in a very trappy table. The lads had lots of VPIP and some traces of PFR, which mean you were in a calling, weak table rather than a value bet table. When i'm in such a table, and especially when the action ended in a limp, my first thought is that my opponent can have literally anything, except premium hands. You would ...


4

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


0

Probability is about information. It is a measure of certainty: how certain can you be that a future event will or will not happen. It is dependent only upon the information you have. You are dealt two cards. The other 50 are unknown. Whether they remain in the stub, or are dealt to 9 other players, or 20 other players, is irrelevant unless you can somehow ...


0

To add to the other answers I think you're confusing two probabilities here. The first one would be the odds of being dealt any two given cards. That probability is constant and doesn't get affected by the number of players. Now when the game goes through the different streets usually the probability that matters is "given my current hand, what are the ...


-1

I think the most direct answer at the question is: yes, it absolutely affects the odds. But in most theoretical calculations relating to poker, we disregard that fact and simplify because we cannot for sure what the other cards are. Ergo, we regard the deck as containing 50 cards, namely all the cards in the original deck minus the two we're 100% certain are ...


3

There are five board cards in hold'em. Since you start with two known cards, there are 50 unknown. That means there are 50x49x48x47x46 ways the board can come. Since the order of the cards on the board doesn't matter, divide that by the number of ways 5 cards can be arranged (120), that's 2118760 total distinct boards. There are 47x46/2 of those boards that ...


2

Action is the one word answer! Antes were common in all higher limit (5/10 and better) Seven Card Stud games, and variants like Eight or Better, and Razz. Very rare in Texas Hold'em games. I also believe that most higher limit five card draw games like lo-ball and jacks or better also commonly had antes. The downside to Antes are that they slow down the ...



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