New answers tagged

1

You are not going to prevent losing to the set. But you could prevent losing your stack to the set. preflop preflop mid just called so AJo is probably ahead or a coin flip to low pair AQ or better would have raised you bet 60 - raised 40 into 1 $50 pot so you are giving 110:40 pot odds = 2.75 : 1 that is going to chase off blanks in the blinds it is ...


0

You raised too small preflop, giving around 25% pot odds to a low pair to call you. He just have to call 40 more for a pot of 110 while he already limped 20, he's not going to fold, especially with a low pair. On flop you should have C-bet to find where you're of at least around 60%. Since you checked, he realized he's not going to get more money in the ...


1

I think you should be raising more here pre-flop, with that said I wouldn't say it's necessarily bad. Villain can't really fold, with what is likely in their early position limping range, for 40 more with 110 in the pot. Very much depends on your style, but I'd probably bet about 80/90 here. I would have bet the flop too. Depending on what the villain does ...


0

Tried to post this as a comment to chris's reply to User93, but i lack reputation. Chris is correct. The odds of both winning the whole pot and losing the whole pot are increased very slightly with a reshuffle, while the odds of a chopped pot are decreased very slightly. The extent of this increase to all or nothing outcomes depends on the situation. ...


1

Sorry for the sick bump. First off about me. I used to be an online pro between 2008 to 2014, with my main game being 10/20 6max of NL and PLO, though I have played as high as 200/400. Short stacking is often a misunderstood "strategy". It gets a bad rap because of ratholers, but it's not all that bad of an idea for most people (provided you know how to ...


6

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


0

Player 2 will win. It is always the best 5 card hand. Player 2's hand: A♥T♥8♥7♥5♥ Player 1's hand: A♥T♥7♥5♥4♥


1

Hands Overview Straight Flush Four of a kind Full house Flush Straight Three of a kind Two Pair Pair High card Why that order? The order is based on math / statistics. It is simply harder to make one hand versus another. Hole cards The cards in your hand. In hold-em two cards. Board Board is the common / shared cards. Best five cards Every hand ...


2

Each player in a basic game of poker is given five cards to make their hand. There are variants to the game where players receive more then five cards and players have community cards. However it is the best five cards of a players hand that make their hand. If the best five cards you have, are not better then another players best five cards you loose the ...


2

I'm not going to lay out the full mathematics, but here is a start that should get you started in the right direction. First, only the best 5 card hand counts, so find that hand and discard the two cards not in that hand. This should be fairly easy to do so I am not going to cover the algorithm for doing this. Next, if I understand the question you want ...


0

Your simplification is over simplified. If you want actual odds uses a calculator At the table it is simple. If you are getting 2:1 on your money AQ is only not getting pot odds against AA, KK, AK, and QQ. It is pretty easy to figure out the hands you are 2:1 dog to. KQ is actually close. The quick safe bet is any two cards Q or better. You are ...


0

if the 2nd table is left 2 handed this would explain why. In 2 handed game the button is the small blind


0

It will cost each player both missed blinds to return to the game. They are collected by the dealer and taken into the pot. I believe they also serve as that player having limped in for the current hand. So if no one raises, they can check and see a flop.


0

I think it can be proven in a rather straight forward fashion. Though the probability of any one hand being dealt to a player doesn't diminish with number of players, the strength of a hand should increase as fewer players are available. For example: a J7 hand would be pretty crap on a table with 10 players as there's a high probability that at least 1 ...


1

Just outs to improve on the next card is fairly straight forward. Probability to win is much more complex. If it is just you against a single player on the river then you can calculate. A starting hand against 3 random hands is very complex. I assume you mean chances (not change). You have poker calculators but there is no formula A straight can get ...


1

You can use this this calculator, but basically you would need to know your opponents hand in order to actually calculate the odds. The probability you have of hitting your outs however, can be calculated. Take a look at my other answer to learn how. If you have a solid read you could try to include the probability of him hitting his hand after you have ...


3

Your "paradox" arises from the fact that aside from your bet, the pot contains enough expected value already for each player that neither could improve their expected ending stack by folding. With too small of a stack, you can't bet enough so that the opponent loses money. However, with your bet you can still reduce the expected overall gain from his point ...


3

We need a bit more information. Starting stacks, bets pre-flop etc. From what it sounds like so far you should have pushed all in pre-flop or after the flop. One thing I disagree with however is when you said that in the long run you would lose money to a flush draw. If you are positive you have him beat and the only thing that will save him is if he ...


2

When you are short stacked you unfortunately don't have the chips to force a bad decision. Accept the opponent is not going to fold. 1/4 pot bet is not going to get them off a flush draw. If you are short stacked then you need to look at it as you are getting 4:1 and you are not going to get a better chance to get your money in. If you held back and ...


3

if your bet leaves you with the stack less than the bet itself, you should have gone all in on the flop. In general, if your bet takes the third of your stack you have to go all-in.


2

Absolutely not. If you are head-up (that is, there is just you and one opponent), then there's nothing wrong with showing cards like this. But once you have two or more opponents it's not just about you anymore. When you show your cards, you are giving information to opponent A that he might be able use against opponent B, and so opponent B is right to be ...


5

But even a call to a raise in early position is not a cheap flop. 2BB is 2BB and you have 4 players behind you that could re-raise. K-10 suited is not just outside the tight range in early position. That is a very loose call. That is only a calling hand in late position. That hand only wins 25% against 5 random hands. When do you raise? Build a big ...


0

There is a saying I've heard relating to poker and it is: "If you're not thinking you're gambling". Yes people will make these decisions because they claim to be a 'LAG','TAG', etc,etc player, but often they'll make these decisions without thinking. I would argue that it is the worst reasoning for playing a hand, unless you're just playing for fun and just ...


1

Frisbee's recent answer raises a good point. QQ just ain't that great here. You are talking about making a cold 5-bet shove without enough fold equity to accomplish your goal. Also because you're making a cold 5-bet, I think QQ is pretty close to one of the worst possible hands you would have in that spot. Showing the table that your hand is at the very ...


1

Technically I think if you are all in and show with other hands live then your hand is still live but this is very poor etiquette and should get a penalty Your odds are just off: The 70 bet is getting 3:1 pots odd to call The 30 bet is getting 2.1:1 pot odds to call And if the 70 bet calls the 30 bet is getting 2.8:1 pot odds to call All three ...


0

PREFLOP: call. Standard, too "deep". FLOP: check. Standard. TURN: shove. Honestly I don't think he is gonna check/pushing flop with FD that much, so he almost never has flash on turn, he probably has FD on turn with 1/2 overcards or pure bluff with random heart, your stack is too short this is not cash game, just PUSH.


1

PREFLOP: Raise to 5BB. In fact the pot is 2+2+1+2= 7, you should put in at least 7 more to steal it, expecially when you are bluffing (for example with A5s or KTs) so up to 2+7= 9. I prefer 10. FLOP: Check. In fact, as played, you should check your whole range in a 3 way. This hand is particularly good to do that since you really want to just check/call ...


1

In summary why in the world you you call that all in bet? Opponent has called three strong bets and then raised all in on an AAA7 board. At this point what could your opponent have other than A or 7? An Ace to me should have checked to stack you on the river I guess they did it before you had a chance to think about it A 7 might have been afraid ...



Top 50 recent answers are included