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0

I decided to run some numbers to confirm if this is a bad call. I did a simulation of around 500k hands, having the following as input: 3 players Pot size after villain pot-sized bet: +/- $ 2250 Villain bet: $ 1000 Board: J♠ T♥ 7⋄ 3♣ A♣ Hero hand: A⋄ K♥ Villain hands: random The result: ...


0

You asked would I do anything different? Yes I would. Raising by 1bb at a play money table, not a good idea. What's the raise trying to do? If it's to thin the field, not a chance. If it's for value, people would put far more in. Let's say instead of raising from 50 to 100 you raised to 650. I guarantee you at least one will call at a play money table - ...


0

Not going to dwell on preflop as others already have done and that's not the decision your interested in. Heros stack should be about 11,300 ish at this point. I think the turn 7 is a check/fold line for sure. It's fairly early on in the tournament and you have over 50 bb in what you say is a decent structured tournament. There will usually be much better ...


0

Let's think what could they hold. I think the most likely hands are connected pair for a straight draw, Ax or maybe a low pair. I don't think they hold high or even mid pair or a strong Ace or one of them would have raised PF. You beat all pocket pairs, you beat all but AK, tie AQ and the straight draw is 16% likely to hit. The obvious question is what if ...


2

There are a lot of questions outstanding in this, but a couple of things jump out at me. It's a micro-limit play money game - people will play anything Your raise to 2x BB with multiple limpers is WAY too small. It's too small of a raise to be considered a raise, really, even in a big real-money cash game. The pot-odds almost dictate that the other ...


1

Without the guy being forced to make a raise of much more then he thought, this hand is simple, I am going to raise the all in just to go head up. V1 is not all that short stacked, just short enough to start pushing with some aces or pairs when he can get it in first. His M is about ten, so he is not entirely desperate yet. Having another player in makes ...


3

Yes. And be careful, a friend lost a large pot at a casino this way. He held A9 against KK all in, and paired his ace on the river. The opponent was trash talking, and in the heat of the moment my friend mucked his 9 (since it wasn't needed to make his hand), tabling just the Ace to demonstrate his win. But the opponent objected, and the floor ...


0

No. Against unknown hands, cash or tournament, you'd be hard-pressed to have both the implied odds and the fold equity to play this hand. The only reason to play this hand would be if it was limped around to you in the BB (which is why open-limping isn't wise: BB can hit his trash he would have folded).


1

I once spent an afternoon analyzing 7-2 with Poker Probe (An old program by Mike Caro). I was curious if there was any situation that justified making a call with 2-7. PP was a pretty simple program, you could run a hand against a configurable hand, or a number of random hands. It for example could tell you how often a particular hand would hold up against a ...


0

Yes you have to show your cards. Every set of rules used in poker says that you must table your cards to have any claim to a pot. Tabling your cards is placing them face up on the table. This is perhaps one of the oldest rules in poker.


1

It's always nice to get a hard-to-detect draw (unless you occasionally land against a miracle full house along the way; the complete/check action often leads to this), but players often overrate the open ended straight draw (OESD). That is, an OESD is overrated and should played with caution; it's true that you have around 32-35% equity but this is only if ...


1

In Texas Hold'em, the hand order goes (Lowest to Highest): No Pair (high card) -> 1 Pair -> 2 Pair -> 3 of a Kind -> Straight -> Flush -> Full House -> 4 of a Kind -> Straight Flush -> Royal Flush. Now if any hand is in a category that is higher than another, that hand wins, no matter what the value of the cards are (example: 22245 beats AAKKQ). In the ...


1

(1) Poker hands have exactly five cards, so you haven't actually described their hands correctly. The first player has something like QQK75, and the second player has something like AAQ92. (2) If both 5-card hands contain one pair and no other valuable combination, the higher pair wins, in this case, the aces. Only if both hands have the same pair do you ...


-1

The two aces are the top combination, he wins. The high card is useful after the combinations are checked.


1

As others have mentioned, the reason the rule exists is to prevent collusion. However, there are legitimate times in both cash games and tournaments when it makes sense to check the nuts on the river, even when last to act, and in my opinion should not be penalized: In a cash game, it is not uncommon for friends to "check it down" once they are heads up. ...


1

You keep iterating but only taking the 5 best cards into account (which means up to 3 kickers in your example wit the pair). So in your example Frank wins while if they would hold A8 and A7 on a 22QJ3 board (no flush), it would be a split (both play a pair of deuces with AQJ as kickers).


1

Tie is neither win nor loss. Therefore, you should have a counter for ties the same way you have a counter for wins. In any case a round with a tie should be removed from your simulation.


0

Yes, you keep iterating through hands (their "best five cards") until someone has a better card. If not, this is split pot. In you example, Frank wins with his Q.


3

The Big Game. (PokerStars) extra characters


1

You're unclear when you say player 2 "doesn't call". Do you mean that he actually made some motion or verbal indication of intent to fold? If so, then the moment that happened, the hand is over and player 1 became the owner of the pot. What happens after that is irrelevant. If that's not the case, and player 2 still has cards in his hand and has not acted, ...


0

Current situation In normal conditions the answer should be 'Yes the player one get's his pot awarded.' But as i always say, some casino/home games have strange rules and you should know them before you sit in a table. Other situation If the player showed his hand and at least 1 other player still act, most of the time the last user can decide his action ...


0

Yes because showing your cards is not an davantage. He may suffers a penalty at the end of the end.


1

In fact this seems to be a very variable rule. Asking in a casino nearby about the house rule regarding this issue they said that they changed the ruling in february. Before that, you had to show your hand on showdown even if all other players had mucked. After that, they changed it that you don't have to show.



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