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1

No. The player with KQ would win the whole pot. The winner of the pot is the player who can make the best 5-card hand from the 7 possible cards -- 5 board cards plus their two hole cards. Player 1 has KQ, so his 7 cards are KKKQ642. Ignoring suits, the best possible hand here is KKKQ6, or trip kings with a queen kicker. Player 2 has K9, so his 7 cards ...


1

The only way to get it out of the PT client is through their export command. It gives you a CSV file which you should be able to import to excel and play with the data, make graphs, whatever. I don't know of any programs that are specifically made for PT but it's just a pgSQL database running on your system which makes it actually easier than a program ...


0

As the other answers point out: Yes and Yes. However, I might want to add "why" would one want to do this. Generally, raising blind is bad form - especially against seasoned players. There is, IMHO, a time and place where it's good play to do this. There are two different types of "raise" to be considered. An "all-in" raise and a relatively standard ...


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It's because your dealing with going from 3 handed to 2 handed. The blind structure reverses when you get to two handed. So when the structure reverses, the guy has to pay 2 big blinds. Pretty simple really.


1

As far as the math for determining this, it gets very involved and complicated. The basic formula is the same though, the cards you can hit to win / the total remaining cards unseen. Now I'm sure the problem your having in the situation you posted is that you don't know the other players hole cards. That throws a wrench in the works. Since you don't ...


1

A VP$IP (voluntarily put $ into pot) of 75%-85% is not just big, it's gravy. You're not just playing loose, you're playing in maniac status, just spewing money and i guess in very marginal situations due to frequency of plays. The VPIP is just the frequency of raising and calling preflop. I don't know if you're calling more than raising but calling too ...


0

Yes, you can raise the big blind, if everyone is just in calls. It is true for no limits.If there is nobody raised then it can be fold, re raise or call. In other words it can be said that you miss the big blind and come later, if you missed the big blind or you leave it. When you come again you didn't want to wait you can join the game.


0

The winner of a hand is defined by the best combination of 5 cards each user has. In this case the best combination each player has is a flush. The rest doesn't matter. If you have a pair 2♠2♣ and the board would be 8♣8♠7♣7♠A♣ you would not have 3 pairs. Because the best combination with 5 cards you can have ...


3

Repeat after me: poker hands have five cards. EXACTLY five cards. No more, no fewer. In Hold'em, each player plays the best 5-card hand he can out of the seven available. Vlad's best 5-card hand is A-8-7-4-2 of clubs. His opponent's best 5-card hand is A-8-7-4-2 of clubs. Split pot. If, perchance, our hero had, say, the 6 of clubs in his hand, then his ...


1

Checking when you have the nuts is generally okay, because some people like to slowplay. The only situation where you're not allowed to do so (and this is true in almost any tournament and casino) is if you're the last to act on the river. In this case, checking cannot be part of any reasonable strategy, so the assumption is that you're colluding. The ...


0

At all times in poker, you are ethically required to play your hand in a way that benefits you, and only you. If you make a play for the benefit or someone else at the table, you are cheating all of your other opponents at the table; this is called "collusion". "Soft play" is a form of collusion, failing to take as much as you can from your opponent (or ...


2

It's not ridiculous. It's softplaying. In this case the guy seems to have made a mistake recognizing that he had the nuts, or maybe he's a good actor. But in general this is illegal because it can be used as a strategy to keep shorter stacks alive in order to maintain some preferable dynamic at the table, or to favor one opponent over another. Perhaps the ...


1

I believe Pokerstars will allow you to play up to 5 play money tables at the same time. You could play on another site at the same time to add more. Most poker rooms will have a cap on the number of play money tables that you can play because you are not a paying customer of theirs and therefore you only get to use so much free bandwidth :)


1

You have to make a clear distinction about what you know up front and what not. If player #1 and player #2 get two cards, they have exactly the same chance that it's pocket aces. Now player #1 looks at his cards, but not player #2 and player #1 sees that he doesn't have pocket aces. Now he has knowledge about the deck and what was left: 50 cards, all aces ...


2

To be brief, In poker a player is never dealt two CONSECUTIVE cards. this in my view changes the odds, No. while also making the number of people at the table as well as the players position a material factor. No. Since the desk is randomly ordered, the order of dealing does not in fact change the likelihood of receiving any two cards. In ...


0

I agree with the other answers indicating that house rules are probably the most important factor here. The TDA tournament rules touch on this subject though (italics added by me): 59: No Disclosure Players are obligated to protect other players in the tournament at all times. Therefore players, whether in the hand or not, may not: ...


7

The odds of getting aces do not at all depend on the number of cards remaining in the deck. They depend solely on the number of cards in the deck (52), how many aces are in the deck (4), and how many cards you receive from that deck (2 in holdem). You have a 4 in 52 (or 1 in 13) chance to get an initial ace. If you get that first ace, you then have a 3 in ...


3

Bottom line: its the rules of the house. Know the house rules. If it's a tournament the tournament manager or another judge can make the decision if there is a dispute, or the dealer will be able to call someone over. If you're at a home game and this isn't addressed you should probably try to convince the host to do a little research and make an official ...


0

Yes you can. There is no rule that says you have to look at your cards before taking an action in poker. And also yes, everyone else will have to match your bet to continue. It doesn't really make any sense to raise the blinds without looking at your hand though. You are just giving the rest of the table free information that you have a random hand.


0

You can't get too fancy versus bad players. That is a recipe for disaster because it will go over their heads and they will just end up calling you down anyways. I have had the most success in really low stakes games on the internet and live by just sticking to an ABC style of play against them. Essentially, other than the flop CBet, I am betting only when ...


3

Depends where you play but in the end you need to ask the rules before you play a tournament or after something like that happens. Every casino/home game has its own rules. But most likely if no one plays after the third player and he shows his cards to someone it won't matter if he goes allin or folds. Most places would accept either decision because it ...


2

It sounds like you should just stop burning cards in home games since they cause grief without meaningfully affecting the game otherwise.


1

Although several of the answers above have certainly covered the rules of the game, I believe your answer may be this: "I have played the free Texas Holdem in one online poker app." Many of the free online apps have been poorly written and therefore have lots of bugs like the one you are describing. Keep that in mind, and as long as you got the rules down ...


3

Repeat this 100 times until it really sinks in: All poker hands have exactly 5 cards, no more, no fewer. EXACTLY 5 cards. In Hold'em, you play the best possible 5-card hand you can make out of the 7 available to you, and your 5 cards are compared against your opponent's 5 cards. Exactly 5 cards, no more, no fewer. If two players both have two pair, the ...


0

If both players have cards of the same rank (eg. 77 vs 77,JJ vs JJ), and they're the only ones to see the showdown (where your cards are finally shown) then they split the pot. That means they share the current pot, 50-50. Although, there are cases where both players have the exact same pair and one of them wins if the board helps them. For example: ...


2

There's a big number of applications out there, ready to ease your massive multi-tabling such as Table Droid (as mentioned by @XVirtusX) or Table Ninja. Keep in mind that these programs don't not do anything more than positioning your tables, open new ones and may/or not optimize your bets. Poker companies are very picky to extra real-time information like ...


2

Certainly customizing hotkeys and layouts for automatic table placements on screen is of big help for anyone seriously considering multitabling. I recommend you to use automatic Table Droid. It has all this features and it is free to use playing in microstakes.



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