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Here is the maths for you. Or well my maths anyway. With 7 cards to choose from in hold'em, your hole cards and the board, the odds of making quads is about 1 in 595. (13 * (48 choose 3)) / (52 choose 7) which = 0.00168067227 or 1 in 595. This is over the entire 7 cards. So for another person to have quads in the same hand we figure out how many possible ...


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Yes, this is a bug. Hold'em rules are pretty universal on this point: when the game is reduced to two players, the big blind for the next hand is paid by whoever paid the big blind least recently, and the other player posts the small blind and takes the button.


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You're looking at it from the skewed perspective where you already have four cards toward your goal. When you look at it from the point of view where you have five random cards, it's less likely that they will form a flush than a straight. So, it's more difficult to even get the four-flush than the open-ended straight draw. The odds for getting a flush ...


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Yes, the probability of that is very low: <0.01%. And, things like that usually happen in an online poker. You want see this stuff much in a live poker.


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It is the best 5 card hand. Player 1 has 7,7,Q,Q,J Player 2 has 7,7,Q,Q,9 Player 1 has a better hand, they win the pot.


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Anyone who sits out just to skip the blinds doesn't understand what's really happening. If you sit out and miss both blinds, once the button gets to you, you'll have to pay both blinds before you're even dealt cards. Same if you skip the SB. You are absolutely not getting a free ride through. Sometimes it may seem like you get by without paying, but it will ...


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This pot is split since the kickers never get a chance to be used. Texas Hold'em is all about making the 5-best combination of cards, regardless of how many of your hole cards are used. In this particular example, the players have this hand: Player 1 hand: T♥ T⋄ A♣ A⋄ J♠ Player 2 hand: T♥ T⋄ A♣ ...


3

Some casinos have a betting line on the table or other house rules that may differ from the norm. But generally, a player in turn is bound by his first action, whether verbal or by movement of chips. A player may count or assemble chips immediately in front of his stack, but if he makes a forward betting motion with chips in hand, that is a binding bet. In ...


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Usually action in turn is binding. The gray area would be whether he actually pushed the chips out as if to signify a bet. Players generally have a right to use the space in front of them to manipulate and count out chips, but once there is a forward motion with those chips, that signifies a bet. Some poker rooms have a line on the table which signifies ...


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I actually do not suggest doing cash tables if you are new to the game. You need to learn position poker and what it means to be utg, sb, bb, and dealer. I say this because when you are playing microstake cash games people don't do the normal or usual play they would do in say a 5/10 dollar game then a .05/.10 cent game. When you play at these small stakes ...


4

I am going to ignore the bet amounts and your stack size first and give you a general answer, you have no fold equity anyway. Well in live, yes you can, there is nothing stopping you from physically turning your hand over and if you're all-in your hand cannot be made dead. However it is extremely bad etiquette. I have been a poker dealer for 3 years, ...


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This is open to discussion, but you generally need to have thousands of hands and i mean 2 digits, like 50k+, to determine your real winrate, filtered by all the lovely downswings, tilt, luck, boredom. I don't know what is your sample size but if you're starting now as you said, i recommend to stick to microstakes a long time. That is because in microstakes ...


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Given the fact that he's voluntarily participating in the pot (VPIP) pre-flop, what's the probability he has the ace? P(Ace | VPIP) = (Prob(VPIP| Ace) * P(Ace)) / Prob(VPIP) So, in order to solve the problem, you need to know not only the probability of being dealt an ace given that you've seen two (it's about 9.5% percent, let's round to 10 for easy ...



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