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9

On the contrary of the answer above, the answer is yes, is the right move. Calling 36000 to win 87000 means that you have must have at least 29% if equity. The hands that has this equity against AK are 22+, A2s+, KTs+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s AKo, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 92o+, 82o+, 72o+, 62o+, 52o+, 42o+ even taking in to ...


3

You should enter the tournament as early as possible. Presumably, you're participating in the tournament because you have some sort of edge against the field. In other words, you should be playing the tournament because it is profitable for you to do so. Playing the earlier stages of the tournament lets you play more hands against your opponents, which ...


3

As you said, it is easy. You want to start with the maximum BB's. Play tight in beginning to increase your stack. If you join as shortstack with around 30 bb's you can be an easy victim by someone who pushes you all in without any problems. That will not happen in the beginning phase, because everyone has the same amount of bb's.. as you said, easy. :)) now ...


2

I can list some "guaranteed prize pool" tips: Yes, you are absolutely right that poker rooms are attracting more players by "guaranteed" prize pools. The guaranteed prize amount depends on the average number of players in this particular tournament in certain time interval. I think that poker rooms definately have statistics based approach here. If the ...


2

The aim of poker is to have all the chips at the end of the tournament, so the more chips you have at any one time, the better. If you are one of the chip leaders then don't bother, you already have plenty of chips to boss people about with. If you are close to the chip lead and the add on is good value then I would probably take it. If you are low then ...


2

I guess the best answer to this is that you should join whenever you will have a stack that you are comfortable playing with. If you are comfortable playing with a short stack then join right at the end of the late reg. (This what i do quite often). As long as you have over 10bb then you have a little bit of play before you have to be in Shove Fold mode. ...


2

This sort of depends on the type of tournament as well. In a Turbo or Hyper I will shove any Ace when i get that low as you need a double up quick. It also depends on the table dynamic, if you have got people willing to call you with any two then you need to tighten up your range slightly. Otherwise your A5 will be victim to someones 2 7 offsuit when they ...


2

Well one way to check the math will be to use some equity calculator and evaluate your AX hand against (X-1) opponents with random hands. I used online calculator at http://propokertools.com/ This is what I got: A2 against 1 player : you: 55.5% equity; opp : 44.5% A3 against 2 players: you: 37% equity; opps: 31,5% A4 against 3 players: you: 28% equity; ...


1

I consider 12 big blinds as my "shove" meter. When I fall below that I'm shoving with live cards. So I always think to myself how much above I am from that amount. That usually helps me feel for how I'm doing since this measure will also change with each tourney level.


1

As a very quick estimation of where I stand, I do use the average stack as an indicator. But, if I'm in a tournament with more than a few hundred players left, I'm constantly aiming to have at least twice the average stack. Even then I'm not entirely comfortable. To put it differently, if I have average stack, I consider myself to be in a weak position ...


1

Most likely not. I know the minimum deposit for me is $10 USD and the minimum withdrawal is $10 USD so I'm assuming the same deposit/withdrawal restrictions would apply for you. Your best bet is probably to just deposit the minimum plus whatever you want to use for buy-ins. In this case, £7 + £1.00 + £0.10. Then after you play your tournament you can ...


1

No the second player does not have to show his hand. If a muck is allowed than he does not have to show. This should again be written in the "house rules". In some Casinos every hand has to be shown at a paid river. Last action shows first. Calling is not an action. So the guy who bets / raises lasts should show first. But if he is allowed to muck his ...


1

I don't think you would have to show your hand in this situation. Not sure why anyone would muck their hand without seeing what their opponent had though. Even if you were playing something stupid, you could still have a better hand than that of your opponent.


1

To be honest, that's generally done in poker. However, People overestimate low aces (A2 etc). The funny thing is that it goes the exact same way with low pocket pairs (but that's out of the question). Having A2 against a simple T7 (for example) would almost be a coinflip. People often think they are miles ahead when they get a low ace versus something KQ ...


1

I doubt that there is such a thing as a "standard practice" when it comes to the reseating process. I too have played in tourneys in which reseated players always take the cutoff seats. This is certainly fair for the players being reseated, but it does have disadvantages: It's not so fair for the current late-position players. Seating new players at the ...


1

To make it simple, Bear in mind that, for those who called your raise in pre-flop, very likely they have an Ace on hand. So basically if there's no Aces on flop, I would raise or even go all-in, not to allow them to draw the chance of catching a pair of Ace. But if an Ace came out, I would definitely just check.



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