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5

If you had more chance to win by playing every hand, everyone would play every hand all the time and there wouldn't be much of a game.


5

Typically, you "race" for the chips. Players get a card for any chips left over. Those chips are then colored up and are paid out based on high card. You cannot be eliminated this way. If you don't have any chips left after the race, you'll get one chip. From Robert's Rules of Poker (Section 15 Rule 8) The lowest denomination of chip in play will ...


5

When you straddle in the traditional sense in a poker room that allows them, it's considered a "live" straddle. Several popular variations of straddling exist, but one common element is that they're "live." This means that the straddler is paying for the privilege of acting last in the pre-flop round of betting. If the dealer in your example is saying that ...


5

OK, let's break it down mathematically. I'm going to use a standard poker equity calculator for this. You have T⋄ 9⋄ You say the all-in player had a medium pocket pair. For this "exercise", let's pick 8♠8♣ Let's consider the third player a typical tight-agressive player, in this case with a standard 18% Range of hands preflop ...


5

Whomever had the most chips at the beginning of the hand places best in the tournament. The number of players or tables does not matter, it just the same as three people going all in on a single table and two bust out. Whomever had the most chips at the beginning of the hand places highest. On the bubble the same thing, if there are 101 players left and ...


5

If such a player is approximating a game-theoretic-optimal (GTO) strategy, then they are essentially putting their opponent in a situation where it doesn't matter what they do. In other words, whatever information you believe you could glean from their play will not help you alter their expectation (i.e., reduce their expectation while increasing yours). ...


5

Judging from what you wrote in the question, I think you are misunderstanding a few concepts here. First, math is math. Math doesn't care if you play poker, running, feeding your dog or doing something else. Math's laws are universal. This means that the math will have the same precision both in the heat of the battle and after the session is over and you ...


4

I'd say it's the players' responsibility to know the blinds. I think you were the one who raised here. I think a good dealer should help prevent these kinds of things, but ultimately it's you who should know the blinds. If in doubt, you should ask the dealer. You acted in turn, so I think your action should be binding. In theory, the BB hadn't actually acted ...


4

No one has answered the actual answer to the question. ICM. ICM stands for Independent Chip Model, taking storm in the late 2000's. ICM determines the value of chips at a given point in the tournament based on pay structure, and players remaining. In essence, the more chips you accumulate, the less they are worth, since the tourney is not a winner take all. ...


3

I haven't looked at the revealed answer yet, and I'm not experienced in tournaments, so YMMV. You haven't said anything about the button's tendencies. Two calls of raises in this hand pre-flop could mean that he's hoping to sneak in with AA or maybe he's a little looser pre-flop because he feels like his stack size gives him some freedom. He would probably ...


3

This depends on several factors... what's customary for the table, blind/ante sizes relative to stack sizes, who you are targeting with your raises. Early on, you can expect to get more loose calls when the blinds are low, so you'll have to raise a higher amount if you expect it to induce a fold -- maybe 3-4x if you're opening, and higher if others have ...


3

Since everyone started the hand with the same chip count and the tournament pays 5 places, the total prize pool for places 2 through 5 should be combined and then divided equally among the 9 people eliminated in the hand. It doesn't matter whose hands were better than others among the losers of the hand. The only relevant fact is the chip counts at the start ...


3

Nothing jumps out at me as being obviously wrong with your play. I agree that the pre-flop shove is a good alternative but I wouldn't necessarily think that your move was wrong. Regardless, you had a great draw and (unfortunately!) those draws aren't always going to work out. You got your money in good and your thinking is along the right lines. This is ...


3

There's a couple of things that come into play here: 1 - I think you need to clarify the action. Did you raise or did you go all-in? There is a huge difference between those two actions, the latter makes your hand seem stronger than the former move. Your post says you just raised - what was the action after that? 2 - you have to look at it from his ...


3

Definitely yes, its worth it. For example: you play MTTs, in the middle of tournament, and you've got a decent stack of chips (not short stacked). Blinds are going high, and a lot of short stacked players will start going all in. And that's where poker math comes into play. Its the best time to increase your stack by doing some calls, if odds / pot odds are ...


3

If he had only 12bb then he had a small, pushing M of 5 (M = stack / blinds + antes) and he was in Red Zone as described in Harrington's zone system. He was in a prime shoving situation since everyone folded before him, his cards consists in vast majority of high cards and any ace. The fact he shoved from hijack means he had even more lower requirements ...


3

I don't see how you could not busted here with AA in a 3-man table. You make a big raise preflop of 4.5x and they both called; that seems a big raise but also on a very loose table, since a guy is calling around 20% of his stack with merely Q7s, so your move of overraising was good, you probably read the table of being very loose, since with AA you want to ...


2

In the big scheme of things at the poker table there are upsides and downsides to math, as well as with intuitive play. For the sack of clarity, generally speaking intuitive play is doing what you feel is right, and mathematical play is what you figure out is right based on a range of factors. Neither is a strategy, they are how you approach the game. The ...


2

I think the player at your table was misinterpreting the rule. This is a raise. Rule 43 states: a multiple-chip bet is a call if there is not one chip that can be removed and still leave at least the call amount. To me, this says that in order for it to be considered a call, there cannot exist a situation where one chip is removed and the resulting ...


2

Of course it's worth it. Playing profitable poker comes down to two fundamental principles: Identify your opponent's strategy. Compute, and implement, the best response. You're falling prey to a common misconception about poker. Too many players try to justify only focusing on principle #1 because it's far easier and more intuitive than putting in hard ...


2

The player at your table is an idiot, obviously. Under his theory player B that raised the $500 bet to $1000 with 2 $500 chips should not have been allowed either since by removing one of his $500 chips wouldn't constitute a legal raise. He is completely misinterpreting the rule. The rule is simple. If you are facing a bet and throw in multiple chips, it is ...


2

Knowing poker math has helped me bet (and win) the occasional hand by understanding pot odds. That made it "worth it" for me. More to the point, it's worth it for someone who plays "occasionally" or more.


2

I think your question is an important one because antes is where I definitely see the most mistakes being made in a tournament. Your thinking is along the right lines. I'm assuming your tournament will have some sort of clock available; that clock should show you the antes and blinds. This clock is your friend, always make sure you know where you're at in ...


2

Those tournament fees, to me would be the determining factor. I am not even sure any player can grind out a living at tournaments when the fee is 25%. The 12% fee at Wynn is about the best tournament deal you can find anymore. If I am not mistaken both these tournaments are deep stack with half hour rounds and large starting stacks around 10K All other ...


2

Each table tends to have it's own emergent raising pattern. In my experience the amount of the raise depends on what the table considers "normal" - like a 3x raise - and how loose the table is. If you want to get an "effective" raise - one that will cause weak (or weaker) hands to fold - you need to find the raise amount that will get people's attention. ...


2

There is really not a standard. I have a standard that I used to use on my web site that I will share, the standard is not one I devised, it was around and used in most card rooms. It is a notation for describing game limits, and tournament levels. With the advent of online poker people started describing games in different ways and what standard there was ...


2

This was a terrible decision, and no competent poker floorman would ever have done that. The game is heads-up; a player has every right to show his cards at any time, and does not lose any privileges by doing so, because there is no third party to be affected. The dealer should simply have reminded the player "you haven't called", and been allowed to call ...


2

Often the reason you end up loosing before reaching a final table means you didn't put enough pressure or you pressured randomly. Knowing your opponents is the key to success in poker. You should maybe try to learn on playing against better players(it's called leveling yourself). You're really good playing against bad players but late stage most of the bad ...


2

As a dealer at a local bar for 40/60$ tournaments, I would consider a player throwing in his card protector as a motion of betting... without any verbal statement, it would count as a bet or a call if another player has bet that street already... This can also be classified as an illegal forward motion especially if the player is looking toward his opponent ...


2

Assuming random hand distribution and players of equal ability, the probability of winning is 1/x. Of course other factors are involved in real poker, so it's impossible to summarize this in a simple formula. If you are interested in the more specific question of how much cash equity you have in a tournament given the remaining players' stack sizes, you ...



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