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seen Aug 12 '13 at 8:21

Jan
15
comment Name of five card Texas Hold'em game?
I'm in Australia. Apparently it's got around. First heard about it about a month ago.
Jan
10
comment Potential all-in rules, does any game use this rule?
"So they'd be live against the all-in player up to however much he had in his stack." That's the idea, but calling an all-in player doesn't protect your own stack. If you later fold, you lose your investment in the pot. The only difference is that because you called the all-in player you can still win their investment in the pot.
Jan
10
comment Potential all-in rules, does any game use this rule?
wilfra: Note that in you're example of raising an all-in after a call, if the calling player folds, you still take their call. Its just that the calling player has a chance to win the all-in player's contribution to the pot, not their own (as they've already lost it to the raising player by folding).
Jan
9
comment Potential all-in rules, does any game use this rule?
@TobyBooth: How do players b&c both fold after a is all-in? Once one of them folds, the action is over, they can't both fold.
Jan
5
comment What is the purpose of blinds?
not with blinds only. Often play is without an ante, only blinds. I agree it's a bit silly to have antes and blinds.
Jan
2
comment What is the purpose of blinds?
Jack: It's not particularly unfair because it rotates, also often you're forced to post a big blind when joining the table, so you can't join/leave to pay less blinds. It's just different. Also, in live play it's simpler, only two players have to worry about playing with their chips each hand, not all the players.
Dec
5
comment Why can't folded hands compete for sidepots?
Thanks for the answer. I think it gives too much advantage to short stacks, short stacks already have an advantage beyond their chips. Firstly, a short stack doesn't have the risk of being re-raised, and secondly, in a tournament that pays beyond 1st place, short stacks have an expected return beyond their stack size. To add the ability of being able to win three stacks in a one-on-one contest I think goes too far. Not that it bothers me too much, I'm much stronger in the push/fold stages of a tournament than I am when the stacks are deeper, so this rule helps me chip-up.
Dec
1
comment Why can't folded hands compete for sidepots?
This doesn't really answer my question of "why". All I can see is that it is "one of the rules of the game". I think my question made it clear that I knew that, so this tells me nothing new.