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I was reading about calculating Odds of hitting the draw but i did not understood how they calculated the following data. Let say, if Outs is 1(which case would it be ? ), so how they wrote 45:1 ?? how they calculated it

Also, what does Smaller set vs higher set means

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"Set" is a term used to describe getting three-of-a-kind when 2 of them are in your hand (pocket pair) and the third one is within the community cards.

"Out" is a term used to count how many cards (out of the total remaining cards) can make your hand the winning hand.

In order to calculate the outs you need to divide the number of cards that will "save you" by the subtraction of all the known cards (cards that were already showed/revealed) from the total amount of cards. for example: if you looking for a spade-flush (13 spades in the deck), you have 2 in your hand, the flop shows 2 more and no other player (3 other players are with you in the table) has a spade in their hand (lets assume that for a sec). Your outs are 9 (13 total spades - 4 already revealed to you). and your odds of hitting that flush is 9/41 (41 = 52 - 2(your hand) - 3 (flop) - 6 (3 other players)).

That gives 22% of getting the flush on the turn plus another 22% of getting the flush on the river. Or a total of 44%

  • why are we considering that No one has a spade, that s something unlike situation ?? according to the chart why they wrote, 45:1 and other similar terms, can you explain that ? – Max456 Oct 3 at 12:10
  • It was for the sake of the example. Also, in a real game you dont really have a way to know other players' hands. So you can assume they dont have it. Unless you read them and can make an educated guess about their hand. – jackhammer Oct 3 at 12:17
  • @Max456, 45:1 and the other odds can be thought of as the number of favorable outcomes on the right and the number of unfavorable outcomes on the left. so if you had set over set 46 times, the smaller set would win once and the bigger set would win 45 times – Clarko Oct 3 at 18:32

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