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Are there any metrics out there that determine the average length of time you have to make a decision in live poker?

For example, let's take a tournament scenario, the antes and the blinds are out there and you are in middle position - how many seconds (minutes??) do you have before you have to make a decision? How much time do you have in late position/button?

Does anyone know if metrics like this exist? I'm assuming the answer is just a few seconds - maybe less than 10 secs for most positions but I want to know if anyone has studied this or if there are sources I can cite.

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    The WSOP no-limit official rule is one minute after someone has requested the clock on a player. (wsop.com/poker-rules/rules_nlpl.asp) It seems likely that other cardrooms could have their own policies. – Chris Farmer Dec 1 '14 at 14:07
  • @ChrisFarmer thank you. I understand that those are maximum times but I'm looking for the average time. In other words, between the time your hole cards reach you and when the action is on you. – Unknown Coder Dec 1 '14 at 16:36
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    Ah, that makes sense. It would be interesting to see that info and how that number changes throughout the course of a major tournament. My guess is that it might be hard to come by. I'm sure online poker providers could easily produce those stats in an online scenario, but in a live setting it seems unlikely that data are available except in cases like the WSOP main event final table where it was televised in its entirety. Good luck. – Chris Farmer Dec 1 '14 at 18:08
  • @ChrisFarmer Indeed, I think it will be very hard to find this info. I'm guessing that it's measured in seconds - but I would love to find a source that I can actually cite. I agree with you though, I doubt many people have studied this formally – Unknown Coder Dec 2 '14 at 16:36
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I think this is unanswerable. If you have n players before you, and the maximum time they have to decide is t seconds, then you have at most nt seconds. But we all know that most players won't take that long to decide. I would guess that the distributions of time taken is uniform, meaning that the average time you get to decide is nt/2. If the distribution is different (but this depends on so many variables) and the average time was v, then you get n*v (seconds) to decide.

I doubt there are any metrics available - you could produce your own if you want to.

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