1

Texas Hold-em, betting after the turn had commenced, then the dealer accidentally flipped the river card before the final player acted. What is the proper procedure to remedy the situation (by rule, if possible)?

  • I would put it back in remaining cards and shuffle – paparazzo Apr 6 '16 at 23:43
5

Depends on the rules in use. Two common sets are Roberts rules and Tournament Directors Association (TDA) rules.

From Roberts Rules:

IRREGULARITIES:

  1. If the dealer prematurely deals any cards before the betting is complete, those cards will not play, even if a player who has not acted decides to fold.

Also Section 5 (HOLD 'EM):

  1. If the dealer turns the fourth card on the board before the betting round is complete, the card is taken out of play for that round, even if subsequent players elect to fold. The betting is then completed. The dealer burns and turns what would have been the fifth card in the fourth card’s place. After this round of betting, the dealer reshuffles the deck, including the card that was taken out of play, but not including the burncards or discards. The dealer then cuts the deck and turns the final card without burning a card. If the fifth card is turned up prematurely, the deck is reshuffled and dealt in the same manner. [See “Section 16 – Explanations,” discussion #2, for more information on this rule.]

From TDA Rules, Recommended Procedure 5-C

C: A premature river card is placed back into the remaining stub, and the premature river burn card is left in place as the river burn. Once action on the turn is completed, the stub is reshuffled and the river is dealt without a new burn card.

  • 1
    The TDA procedure you describe is pretty much the universal rule in all casinos I've ever been in. – Lee Daniel Crocker Apr 8 '16 at 17:31
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It depends on the house rules :) Usually they put it back, shuffle up and deal :)

  • By this same logic, you could say that the winner at showdown is the person who talks loudest, due to depending on house rules. Sure, normally accepted rules would state that it's the cards that speak and thus determine the winner at showdown but this is a house rule. (But when not depending on the house to make things up on the fly, there are standards one typically depends on.) – mah Apr 8 '16 at 23:58

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