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I heard that playing shortstacked PLO in cash games can have a big advantage. Say ~50BB deep. I have a couple of question about this.

  • How can this be a big advantage?
  • What would be a good general strategy? (especially pre-flop)
  • What would be a good counter strategy against a 50BB deep stack when I have 100BB?
  • Can you clarify for me what you mean against a lot of broken stacks? - I'm pretty sure you mean all the stacks started big but not a bunch of them have lost a lot and are similar stack to short? Just so I can answer this part to be relevant. – Grinch91 Dec 11 '17 at 10:51
  • @Grinch91 by 'a lot of broken stacks' I just mean against stacks that by far are not the standard 100BB deep. I'd say anything between 30BB-70BB. – Raymond Timmermans Dec 11 '17 at 11:31
  • Good answer - short stack means play tight up front, and get your money in aggressively, early. If your large stack opponents play the same general strategy, you will win more often because they will occasionally bet each other out of a side pot, propelling you into first place for the main pot. – Jerome Pride Jun 7 '18 at 23:22
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The general strategy for Omaha is the same for playing short stacked in any poker game. Play tight aggressive. The concept is that you put your money in when you are against a large field with the best hand. Because you are short stacked, sometimes you will have situations when you get it in and can't be made to fold, and you somehow win hands you might have otherwise folded. Compare to having a large stack, where you will have to occationally fold in situations that would have won. This is the essence of the short stack advantage. So Omaha, Stud, whatever... short stack means play tight up front, and get your money in aggressively, early. If your large stack opponets play the same general strategy, you will win more often because they will occationally bet each other out of a side pot, propelling you into first place for the main pot.

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