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11 votes
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Risky home game hand, right or wrong move?

Before you bluff an amateur be sure they are willing to make a big lay down. Sounds like you put 435 at risk to win 130. You put him on a 2 pair or a big pair. If you really had QQ, TT, or QT would ...
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10 votes
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All-in, pre-flop with AK... twice. Was that a bad decision?

If your laying down AK to a loose cannon that is raising all in all the time you are making a huge mistake. These calls you made all in were just fine. You will get the guy sooner or later. The 99 he ...
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  • 5,473
9 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to go all-in when you have KK?

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their ...
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8 votes
Accepted

When to call all-in in heads-up game?

You haven't provided enough information. This is entirely dependent on what the action was leading to the all-in, current stack sizes, and the frequency with which your opponent is taking said action. ...
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  • 1,760
8 votes

Can "run it twice" be a +EV in a long run?

Running it multiple times does not move EV an inch. It only reduces the variance. I think the example from kiota is spot on (+1). On the river the number of down cards is 44. Even after you see 2 ...
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  • 6,849
7 votes

All-in, pre-flop with AK... twice. Was that a bad decision?

It is definitely profitable to be calling with AKo and AKs against someone shoving 100% of their hands. Using the Poker stove calculator, AKo will win 65.20% of the time against an opponent's random ...
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  • 835
7 votes

In a tournament if you walk away from the table when "all in" did you "abandon" your hand?

"A hand may be considered and mucked if player is not at his seat" - WSOP rules. This is hand abandonment. "At his seat" is defined as touching or in reach of one's seat. However, this rule only ...
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  • 541
7 votes
Accepted

Need analysis of flop bluff shove

*Range charts made with https://premiumpokertools.com/equity-calculator Here's my analysis! Assuming your opponent is min-raising about 80ish percent of hands preflop, a reasonable calling range ...
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5 votes

Flush draw against very aggressive player

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand ...
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  • 5,473
5 votes

Trips vs flush draw on the turn

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a ...
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  • 518
5 votes

Is it correct to go all-in when you have KK?

It depends on a lot of things. The first thing to consider regardless of your cards is how well do you manage your bankroll ? If you are playing for all the money you have in your life then the answer ...
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  • 51
5 votes
Accepted

Pot Odds Paradox in Short Stack

Your "paradox" arises from the fact that aside from your bet, the pot contains enough expected value already for each player that neither could improve their expected ending stack by folding. With ...
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  • 1,938
5 votes

Rules when blinds are all-in

In all games I've ever played, if a player is all in for less than one big blind, players must still call an amount equal to one big blind and the minimum raise is still to two big blinds as usual. ...
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  • 1,562
5 votes

Confused about pot odds

Here is another way to look at it: Gained if you call and win: 30+50 = 80 Lost if you call and lose: 50 Your Equity = 0.36 EV = Equity(Gained when win) + (1-Equity)(Lost when lose) EV = 0.36(80) + (1-...
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  • 166
5 votes

Can "run it twice" be a +EV in a long run?

EV does not depend on how many times you run it, only variance does. I will try to illustrate it with a simple example: Assume heads-up play. You play all-in on the turn and you have x outs to win ...
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5 votes

Can a player win an ante higher than his all-in bet?

This is an expert opinion and not expert answer. While were I am at we have been doing the blind ante in larger NLH games and NLH tournaments this question has not come up with me anyway. Yes the all ...
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  • 5,473
4 votes

Is it correct to go all-in when you have KK?

Yes, definitely go all-in. Most people go all-in pre-flop with hands way worse than KK, e.g., AK, AQ, QQ, JJ. And statistically speaking, KK is only worse than AA, so you should definitely go all-in.
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  • 169
4 votes

What is the minimum raise after an all-in?

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. ...
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  • 166
4 votes
Accepted

Why some people all-in in the VERY first hand?

This sounds like a play money game, am I correct? If so, then I can assure you these same people would not be doing this in a real money game in almost all typical circumstances, except maybe a ...
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  • 6,483
4 votes
Accepted

Raising and multiple All-Ins

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have ...
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4 votes

All in when you are chip leader

You lose as many chips as he had, the rest of chips are considered the same as an uncalled raise and are returned to you.
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  • 1,023
4 votes
Accepted

All-in rules in extreme cases

No. Player 2 can either call by putting in 100 to match the big blind here, or he can raise to any amount 200 (100 big blind + 100) or more. Then players 3 and 4 will have their right to act, during ...
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  • 3,858
4 votes

Why decide whether or not to run it twice based on what the opponent has?

It is true that running it multiple times will not influence the expected value and therefore the hand of the other player does not matter in the decision to run it multiple times. As an example: ...
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  • 750
4 votes

Betting in all in situation

Short answer: no, player 1 can't raise here. Assuming here that player 1 opens the betting in your example, player 2's all-in is less than an official raise, so it does not re-open the betting for a ...
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  • 3,858
4 votes

Burning cards after all-in

Yes. You must burn a card every street, I.E. before the flop, before the turn and before the river.
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  • 4,401
4 votes

Dead raise in tournament

Your right that ruling was wrong. A raise is at minimum is double the bet, when someone goes all in for something less then a "full raise" it is not technically a raise. There is not really a good ...
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  • 5,473
4 votes

Putting Crazy Players on a hand

Ok ok, this is literally a secret I learned form a whole year of surviving on poker before I got a job. This makes the difference between breaking even and winning and it's such a delicate change too.....
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  • 684
4 votes

All in or fold strategy

This all-in or fold play is most likely due to the fact that blind levels were moving fairly quickly for a live tournament. 20 minutes is only enough time to play around 10-15 hands, depending on ...
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  • 3,182
4 votes

All in betting when you are last in chips

Your friend is wrong, betting continues as normal for players still in the hand. No one else needs to go all-in, they can if they wish. Any extra chips that the all-in player cannot cover will be ...
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  • 4,401

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