4

In general, I don't think there should be lots of changes. If you have x dollars in your bankroll now, and if you have the financial situation where you can afford to add y dollars per month to your roll over z months, then your virtual bankroll z months in the future is x + yz. You still need honestly to assess your win rate and variance to know whether ...


4

This question is considered by way to many players as relevant to building a bankroll. What you are winning or losing in any particular session has nothing to do with your expectation. One is going to have rushes and bad runs. These things even out. What the important thing to keep in mind is that you want to play winning poker for as many hours as you can. ...


4

Generally bankroll management for cash games determines how many buyins you want depending on how much risk you are willing to take that you could lose your entire bankroll - despite playing profitably - due to variance (i.e. "bad luck"). Firstly, you're unlikely to find online games where you can buy in for 1,000 big blinds anyway, but even if you did, you ...


3

I like Grinch91's answer about clarifying what your goals are and looking at the money as buy-ins--I just wanted to add a couple perspectives. One skill that would really help you is to be able to disassociate money from your chips at the table. Think of them as chips--just a tool for keeping score. When you start with 100 chips, whether they cost 1 cent ...


3

Reloading to the max enables you to win the max possible amount from other players. If you think you have an edge over others at the table, you should be happy to have the largest possible amount of chips in front of you. When you first sit at a table or whenever you sink below that max buy-in threshold, you should want to top off your stack. On the other ...


3

I remember reading on pocket fives a long time ago that you will want one extra buyin, beyond the typical recommendation of 25-40 buyins, for each additional table that you will be playing. 20 buyins is a little on the low side unless you can afford to replace it if you go broke. If you start with 40 buyins, the chance of going broke (assuming that you are ...


3

If it doesn't cost you anything to withdraw or deposit (no fees), I don't see any benefit of keeping a large bankroll online. Plus it could be a form of money management by keeping a % of your bankroll on a site. If you bust and can't buy in over and over, it will force you to take a break by redepositing and hopefully getting of tilt.


3

Wanted to comment on Clarko's answer but ended up too long so here's my own. 1,000 buyins is way too much. If you're making a good $15 per hour on 1/2, you're only making $12,000 after a year of playing (800 hours). This is 6% ROI, some banks almost give better returns. My own recommendation is 20 buy ins. Since the buy in for some games is 200-300 BB, ...


3

You recover by thinking of your next session as position zero, square one. Heaters and downswings are irrelevant of your future sessions so don't think about them. Don't change your strategy based on a small sample size of winning or losing sessions. You mention about 5 sessions. That's absolutely nothing. Sure you need to look into your overall graph to ...


2

I used to have my bankroll split between various sites and my winning on MoneyBookers (called "Skrill" nowadays). Then I ended up keeping my bankroll mostly on one big site and withdrawing my winnings to my bank account. A huge problem with splitting on different sites is that it's great while your clear bonuses (and reload bonuses) but besides that, it's ...


2

Bankroll questions always have to take into account more than just what you currently consider your bankroll. So you have $1100 right now and are playing a $300 max buyin game (I'll deal with whether this is a good idea or not shortly), which makes it quite likely that you could lose that entire $1100 in a few bad sessions (even with your stop loss and ...


2

LIFE You might reconsider if it's worth taking 4 hours travel to go play poker. Unless you do it once a month or so. I'd tell you to find a better way to make money perhaps. Poker is a tyring, stressfull game. If you play too long and have to travel 2 hours to go and 2 hours to come back you might consider that one day you might get an accident because you'...


2

This is called ratholing and is generally not allowed. If you want to remove money from the table you will probably at minimum be forced to sit out for some amount of time.


2

Stop thinking of it as "I won 1$, that's not much" and start thinking of it as I won a buy-in or two buy-ins. Start asking yourself what you want to use poker for? If you're playing cash games and want to play them for the sake of earning a side income or main income you need to change that attitude. You need to decide in x months I want to be player y level ...


2

The Official PCA site on How To Qualify hints that: "The PCA page on the PokerStars Blog page has blog posts from Team PokerStars Pro, which give poker strategy advice that's designed to help you in your qualification campaign." But when you actually go to the site (Here is the generic .com version but it can depend on your region; as you can see in ...


2

It's true that so-called "action flops" can increase the size of pots and therefore increase the rake dropped for each hand. It's also true that there is the potential for financial gain to be had for a poker site in tweaking the "luck" that certain classes of players have on a site. But... these are hard problems. How do you inject action flops into your ...


2

If you have a little background in calculus, you'll notice that the dg(x)/dx line is the derivative of g(x) and then is set equal to 0 to find the critical point which in this case will be a maximum point and thus the optimal fraction of the bankroll to bet. Here is a little background/refresher on performing derivatives with log functions. Whether or not ...


2

A hustle is really easy to spot, someone you don't know very well or at all will ask you to do something involving money. Usually something involving a little easy money for you. In the case of the player trying to sell a large chip at a slight discount, or sports ticket, or slot ticket or any gaming instrument of value, there are many things that can go ...


2

An experienced winning player could opt to chose an aggressive bankroll management style. An advantage of this is you can wager a higher percentage of your bankroll and thus hopefully winning fast and moving up to higher stakes quickly. The disadvantage is you can lose a lot quickly too and you'd have to move down again or deposit more money into your ...


2

I am also an undergrad and I have been playing in my free time as well. The most important thing to realize about bankroll management is that you will most likely not win when you start playing. Always keep the long term in mind, and focus on improving your game rather than short-term results. When you first start playing, don't deposit money that you ...


2

This is not accurate for a 1/2 cash game, 1000 buy ins would be a very large bankroll. To be very safe, aim for around 100 buy ins for cash games. Just remember that the lower # of buy ins you have the higher your chance of going broke (assuming stakes do not change), no matter how good of a player you are. This is due to a phenomenon called gambler's ruin. ...


2

Some of the things you say in your question say a lot about how you view your situation: I'm particularly concerned because of how hard I chased in the two losses. I went off the rails and bought in for way more than I had planned. I knew I was not in a good place mentally going into the home game. The first step to managing your bankroll correctly during ...


2

As I pretty much always say in questions around a home game, yes go ahead, as long as something is agreed by everyone it's fine. It's important everyone agrees and that it's above the table as a deal. As Jon said in his comment, as long as the chips and cash match at the end it's all good. Likewise as you said too, there is nothing stopping you from using ...


2

There unfortunately is no silver bullet type of answer for your question, but there is some things that you can do to help you achieve your goal. Most importantly, study and get really good at 6-card PLO, this will take time. away from the table study and at the table practice. Get some type of software to track your progress, review hands, and keep ...


1

I'm certain you cannot calculate the risk of ruin this way. You'll get some kind of number, but it won't be related to ruin. If your data merely contains the hands PLAYED, and it's limited to pre-selected winning players, what kind of information does it represent? By definition, your players are never ruined. I suppose you could get some kind of metric ...


1

Not a directly answer of which satellites And I know you know poker math but math on shove fest If you only play AA, KK, and AK you will get that every 47.35 hands Round it up to 48 In 120 hands (15 orbits) you will get it 3 times (on average) Against 2 others in shove fest you are 50:50 to win and triple up If you can survive three coin flips (1/8) ...


1

I haven't played limit in a long time nor have I been to Vegas in a while, but I find it surprising that there wouldn't be any 5/10 limit games available--there's so many poker rooms--but I'll take it that you've looked into it. Generally, I've heard that around 300-400 big bets is considered a good bankroll for live limit hold'em for a decent, winning ...


1

Normally you should keep playing as long as you feel you have an edge over the table. If you do want to work with a certain cut-off point, it would be better to specify it in time than in winnings or loosings. For instance, you might know from experience that you can't keep focused for more than 4 hours, so you quit after 4 hours, unless you are at an ...


1

You should maximize your winning by entering with $300, 100 BB. Entering with less forces you to be very selective with your cards, even in late position, which is not what you may want in cash game. I personnaly don't like rules about when to leave, because it may put you on autopilot and neglect to think about what is really happening in the session. More,...


1

Before choosing what to do, you should ask yourself a few questions: What is the average stack? Did I loose 12 caves because I am unlucky or are the others better than me? Do I have some kind of edge on my opponents that can makes me win over them for the rest of this session? If those 1000 can allow you to see more flops and put pressure, you should stay ...


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