7

Generally a donk bet is when a players leads out with a bet (often on the flop, but could also be turn or river) before the preflop raiser has acted (i.e. when the preflop raiser was in position relative to the now donk-bettor), as you have alluded to. To answer your specific questions: Yes Yes Yes Originally the term was used to describe any bet which ...


4

Checking in the dark is a high level play to reestablish position on the flop. Like someone else already mentioned, most of the time this is done with drawing hands, as someone with vulnerable hands like AA/KK would most likely never make this move. It is essentially a way of giving away less information regarding your hand and how it relates to the flop. ...


4

How to open from button heads up pre flop? That's up to your strategy, really. In heads-up matches, keeping in mind that you play deep-stack, it is common practice to play a wide range of hands in position. This way you apply huge pressure to your opponent, because in order to defend he needs a) either to call wider and play lots of hands out of position (...


4

I would play 99 in early position. I would do a standard raise from this position. If the flop contains a 9 you are golden. Anything below 9 you still have good odds. Anything above a 9 could be in your range (at least my range) for early position play.


4

Ok ok, this is literally a secret I learned form a whole year of surviving on poker before I got a job. This makes the difference between breaking even and winning and it's such a delicate change too... Identify the play BEFORE you have to make it. If you saw her reraising you preflop, you need to gather data and think about what % she might be bluffing you ...


4

As always, rules may vary by cardroom, but generally yes. The common rule is that an out-of-turn action is binding if the intervening action does not change (whether that action is a check or call). If an intervening player raises, then the out-of-turn player is off the hook and may take any action. So in your scenario, player 1 checks, player 2 is silent ...


3

Position is so important in PLO, even more so than NHL (of course not to say position isn't important in NHL) for several reasons. PLO being a capped betting game (meaning you can't just shove live NHL) means that by being in position you can close the betting by just calling, thus better controlling the size of a pot can actually become. Unlike NHL, even ...


3

The only options P1 has are to call, raise, or fold. P1 could only check if he had already matched the highest bet (which he hasn't, because of the raise). P2 then has to call the highest bet, raise it, or fold, for the same reasons. The fact that P4 folded has no impact on what options P1 and P2 have. Edit based on comment: The round (pre-flop, flop, turn,...


2

This depends A LOT on: the player's body language baseline in the past, what kind of hands he showed at showdown after doing this whether or not he was happy if other players folded to him in the same situation. Being happy usually means your bluff worked. Being sad means he didn't extract all the value he wanted from the hand and others (obviously, it's a ...


2

There's a 23.30% chance the other players have one of {66+, A7+}. Yes, there is an easy way to calculate the chance of a dominating hand behind you. You can use a program like ProPokerTools Odds Oracle to model the scenario and determine the probabilities. There is a free trial available. Below is a screenshot of the calculation as well as the log file. ...


2

A donk bet occurs whenever a player bets post-flop, while there is another player who has the betting lead.


2

The one with the dealer button always acts last in post-flop play and the big blind is last in pre-flop play. Therefore, since in heads-up the small blind had the dealer button, Danny acts first pre-flop and last post-flop. This is one of the reasons heads-up is verry different from multiplayer matches.


2

Not agreeing with your analysis of cannot put her on a monster because she only called the big blind pre-flop. She 3 bet your raise. That is a sign of strength. Check raise the flop is a sign of strength. Getting 8:1 you have to call with top pair in that spot. When a table is loose play tight.


2

Against players that play anything from any position, the easy answer is that you can not put them on a hand. If they are taking lines that are unusual and they play any hand in any position, putting them on a hand would be challenging if not impossible. I think you did the right thing by trying to get a live read, that will certainly give you some ...


1

I'm assuming this is Texas Hold'em. In Texas Hold'em, you play the best 5-card hand you can, regardless of whether those cards come from your hole cards or the community (board) cards. That means a player could make a hand with any of these combinations: 3 community cards + 2 hole cards 4 community cards + 1 hole card 5 community cards + no hole cards ...


1

Clarko's answer is correct but I think a bit misleading, especially for games with unusual blind structures. The correct way to determine betting is this: in every betting round but the first, the player to the dealer's left ("age") acts first, and the dealer acts last. On the first round, except when head up (that is, any number of players other than two), ...


1

The blinds are late position preflop, but they should be treated as early position when deciding what hands to play. The blinds give you the advantage of seeing what all the other players do preflop before you make your decision, but after you make a preflop decision you will be first to act. Essentially, the blinds allow you to get more information from ...


1

Donk is also used to describe a weak player or weak move. I think it derives The aggressor is the last raise from the previous round. Donk bet has come to mean opening out of position against the aggressor. Typically only applies to the flop. Number of players, board, and defend blind does not matter. Donk bet is not always a bad move. Out of ...


1

How often should a bot call a human in this situation given different bet sizes is what I now understand the question to be, and with no previous information or statistics to go on. The goal then is to stay the least exploitable as possible while calling enough to start gathering stats to use in further hands. Here's one possibility that I thought of that ...


1

I would definitely play 99 from any position (or even 88 from UTG). The hand itself is certainly not a strong one if it remains unimproved and pre-flop it might be near the bottom of my range (depending on table dynamics) but I don't think it's ever unplayable. Like all hands I will play, if I'm first to open (I'm either UTG or it's been folded to me), I'm ...


1

When faced with what you believe to be a tough play such as this one it is helpful to review the hand and narrow your opponents range. You did not give specifics (it would be helpful to know action), but lets assume this is a 10 handed game and take some liberties to demonstrate. UTG +2 raises to $20 (4xBB) in this spot we can often assume he is playing a ...


1

It of course could be both. If you just sat down in the game and you don't know the player you are kind of in the dark with this one and need to have a very narrow range of hands that you are going to call with. Like playing online, you calculate your risk. However after you have played with the player for awhile you will be able to be more accurate with ...


1

After P4 folds, P1 and P2 has to check or raise P3's bet to continue in the hand, otherwise they have to fold, have it be the flop, turn, or river. If P1 or P2 raises the hand, P3 would then in turn need to check or raise. This would keep the round going for as long a it should until all players are equally matched in the pot. Thus said if either P1, P2 ...


1

Interesting question. A good thought experiment perhaps. Firstly, something to consider is was he closing the action pre-flop when he called? This really isnt something you'll encounter very often, so i'd be inclined to give it almost no significance, until I could establish how my opponent was using it in their own unique way. Obviously, that's not going ...


1

People use to blind check when they don't want to show their weakness. they are sitting on a draw and are hoping to complete it. when they first see the flop and then check they are showing "weakness". so your info is, that he is setting up a trap or he has a draw. when they instantly checking you will never know if they probably completed their "draw". I ...


1

For me, the best way to play Aces is to sometimes limp-in and other times raising preflop. In the games I play, if I raise 15 to 20 it doesn't surprise me to to get 3 to 5 callers. The problem I run into, is let's say I get 3 callers of 20 dollars, now there 80 in the pot and, even with a good flop for Aces, it's so hard to know where my opponents are at. ...


1

To make it simple, Bear in mind that, for those who called your raise in pre-flop, very likely they have an Ace on hand. So basically if there's no Aces on flop, I would raise or even go all-in, not to allow them to draw the chance of catching a pair of Ace. But if an Ace came out, I would definitely just check.


1

I'm saying player stats and history are random here. In a 6-seater SNG with 50 BBs, the best plays subjectively are: 1) Call 2) 3-bet small 3) Fold 4) 3-bet large If I was deep in an MTT holding AT on the BB and button shoved with a similar stack, well, with 50 BBs against a random opponent it's an ...


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