24

In a cash game, never fold AA preflop. You're always ahead. The only time this might be reasonable is in a tournament, and the reasons would relate directly to ICM calculations. Even then, the situations will be rare where folding AA is reasonable.


16

Theoretically, no. For every dollar you and your opponent add to the pot, you stand to win your dollar back plus some of his, regardless of his hand. However there are a few practical edge-cases worth considering. Trusting the game If this is your first time playing in a home game, there are a few ways this could be a mistake. The first is cheating; ...


12

Your question is slightly all over the place but I'll try to answer it the best I can. First, it seems like you've fallen prey to a common mindset issue many, mostly recreational, poker players have. You shouldn't be measuring your results by what you're currently up or down during one session. You'd be surprised to learn that winning players are really ...


10

The only time you can consider folding AA preflop is: You are on the bubble in a tournament, and More than two players are all in, and one of them WILL bust, and Your stack is such that you could bust out if you call, and If you fold, you are guaranteed a place in the money. ALL of these things MUST be true to make folding AA the right decision. There is ...


10

Is there an inherent advantage/disadvantage to having a larger stack than your opponent in a cash game? No. There is no advantage nor disadvantage, because you play for his stack, not yours. If you have 75 BBs and he has 40 BBs, the maximum you can win is 40 BBs, the rest of 35 BBs being returned to you. I would think if you expect to have a skill ...


10

If your laying down AK to a loose cannon that is raising all in all the time you are making a huge mistake. These calls you made all in were just fine. You will get the guy sooner or later. The 99 he had you were slightly behind but for the Qx you dominated. I will sometimes get out of games like this, usually because I am not able to get the guy and ...


9

how would you play this hand knowing that the villain is an incredible calling station who will put his entire stack even on the 2nd pair? You did put all your stack when you were way ahead and he called: that is perfect! I'm not saying that's how you should always play KK like that: but versus an opponent which you know cannot fold, the goal is to go ...


9

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


8

Jam on the flop after the small blind bets $80 into a $210 pot. This is a perfect opportunity to semi-bluff. You have 9 outs to the nut flush and 3 outs to top pair. The only hands that are going to be comfortable calling your all-in are a completed straight or combo draw. You'll get a fair amount of folds from overpairs/top pair in this spot and many good ...


7

1) Did you find my thought on flop reasonable of calling? Yes, absolutely. You should only tend to count backdoor outs as 1 out though. Giving yourself 3 extra outs for a backdoor flush draw is a little too generous. Apart from that your calculation was perfect. He gave you a great price to call and if you pair your King/Queen or hit your gutshot on the ...


7

It is definitely profitable to be calling with AKo and AKs against someone shoving 100% of their hands. Using the Poker stove calculator, AKo will win 65.20% of the time against an opponent's random holding, and will still win 62.12% of the time against an opponent who shoves only with the top 20% of hands dealt. Similarly AKs wins 67% of the time against ...


7

I found some opening charts here which you might find useful: Semi-Loose Tight There is also a chart here with calling, 3-betting and 4-betting ranges:


6

You characterize the villain as very tight so with that in mind, his range is narrow and rarely includes any bluffs, if any at all. I'm guessing you think the same. That said, I'd split his range into two parts, his core range and a secondary range. His core range is likely [AQx, KQx, QJx, KJs, KTs]. His secondary range is likely [JJ ,TT, 99]. If i'm ...


6

If such a player is approximating a game-theoretic-optimal (GTO) strategy, then they are essentially putting their opponent in a situation where it doesn't matter what they do. In other words, whatever information you believe you could glean from their play will not help you alter their expectation (i.e., reduce their expectation while increasing yours). ...


6

It seems quite plain to me that the sequence of events it crucial to resolving this situation. The fact that villains hands is mucked, and that a live hand is in play means Hero should be awarded the pot. It seems irrelevant to me that the Hero's four hole cards aren't all exposed. It also seems disingenuous that the game runner should award himself half ...


6

*Range charts made with https://premiumpokertools.com/equity-calculator Here's my analysis! Assuming your opponent is min-raising about 80ish percent of hands preflop, a reasonable calling range against your small 3-bet size might be this: After the flop, removal effects make villain's range look like this: When you shove 3.5 times the flop, the villain's ...


5

Is there an inherent advantage/disadvantage to having a larger stack than your opponent in a cash game? It really depends on the other stack sizes at the table. If you buy in for the minimum and everyone else at the table is lower then its fine. If there are people with max buyins then you need to buy in at that. You want to be able to maximise your ...


5

It all depends on pot odds. If you have better than 50% pot odds and have 50% equity versus your opponent's range, and you have the bankroll to handle the variance, then you should be looking to play for stacks. This will always produce a long term winning strategy, because you're getting >50% return on a 50% bet. Do you see why? The only situation where ...


5

Should Hero have called villain's pre-flop raise, re-raised, or folded? The only thing you can do is call. You've labelled Villian as tight-aggressive and he's made a small reraise after you've opened under the gun. This is a fairly strong sign of strength. Let's look at your options: Jamming: KQs is doing badly against the average TAG players range in ...


5

The most important thing to note here is that it's very unlikely for him to have a hand better than yours. If you consider the entirety of his range, only a small portion of it are suited club hands. As such, the likelihood of him having a completed flush here is minimal. It's important to note that against a completed flush, you still have 34.49% equity ...


5

It depends on a lot of things. The first thing to consider regardless of your cards is how well do you manage your bankroll ? If you are playing for all the money you have in your life then the answer is easy here... Even with AA you should fold, and you should leave the table and play some lower stakes. Even if the math shows a positive expected value you ...


5

Judging from what you wrote in the question, I think you are misunderstanding a few concepts here. First, math is math. Math doesn't care if you play poker, running, feeding your dog or doing something else. Math's laws are universal. This means that the math will have the same precision both in the heat of the battle and after the session is over and you ...


5

Pre-flop, with six limpers coming around to me in the big blind (and no information about the personalities at the table), I wouldn't be too thrilled with any pocket pair. With a premium pair, I'd raise for sure, but I think with sevens, you made the right move by calling. If you hit a set, great; if not, you lost nothing. The flop was great for you. You're ...


5

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


5

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


5

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


5

Unless you think your opponent only ever does this move with AA, you're likely to be at least a 70-80% favourite to win the hand. Maybe not the bet to be making with your entire net worth, but with a portion of your poker bank on the table, I'd call this every time. Of course you're not going to win 100% of the time (and it hurts when you do lose - ...


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