6

From what I know they track certain metrics to determine bots. Most bots are pretty damn weak but as individuals are often hard to detect. What they track tend to be the following: Repeated use of identical bet-sizings (some humans have this trait also) Repeated use of certain lines (especially uncommon lines) Relentless aggression in certain spots (bots ...


6

I have over 1M hands in my poker database and everything holds true for the RnG of any site. Stats I can look up are frequency I get hands like AA and odds of calling and shoving all in's. Everything is fine and well within the norm. The RnG is the same for all, there are no juiced hands. As vlzvl says if you lose regularly then the only person to blame is ...


4

Generally speaking there is limited scope to what happens. Generally, the house is not responsible for damage done by cheaters, and they really don't have a right to say confiscate chips or cash to redistribute them to other players. A private game on the other hand has about any remedy they choose, and have chosen various remedies up to, and including ...


4

The WSOP has rules against collusion and card throwing, the collusion rule is as follows b.Collusion is defined as any agreement between or among two (2) or more Participants to engage in illegal or unethical acts against other Participants. Collusion includes, but is not limited to, acts such as: chip dumping; soft play; sharing card ...


3

No it is not. The standard rule is "one player per hand".


3

No question is silly, and you are right, it is for preventing cheating. Let me elaborate on that. The main reason for burning top card is to prevent players from using a marked deck. For example, if someone is marking cards in one way or another they would be able to identify what would be the next card to come even only seeing the back of it. Without ...


3

I have seen this happen before, it really depends on the player who mucked their cards. They can either let it slide or call the floor over. It is definitely not cool to look at another players cards if they mucked them (from an etiquette standpoint). I believe dealers are also supposed to protect the muck, I have seen a lot of people try to turn over cards ...


2

At a casino, it would be difficult to mark the decks without being seen. In addition, the decks get swapped every few hands, so you would have to mark multiple decks, which increases your likelihood of getting caught. If you are talking about a private home game, the glasses and your actions would raise suspicions, especially if you won regularly with junk ...


2

So this really depends on the number of players in a hand. Ultimately the outcome will be the same but the number of players in the hand determines if a penalty will be applied or not. Lets just get the easy, no questions about it part done, if there are more than two players in the hand, under the industrial standard poker tournament rules (TDA or WSOP) a ...


2

The best way to handle this is for the dealer to call the floor over. The floor should explain that no player is allowed to touch another player's cards, and you're especially not allowed to touch the muck, which is in the dealer's possession. If it happens again, the player will be asked to leave. Handling it like this let's the offending player save face, ...


2

You alone cannot determine if a poker server is cheating. Making that determination for all but the most ridiculously obvious biases requires statistical analysis of a sample size of millions, perhaps even billions of hands of poker. So in the case of the Absolute Poker scandal, where a player could see his opponent's hole cards and was making no attempt to ...


2

Without any knowledge of their code, it is very difficult to find out how their randomness is generated. It would take knowledge in cryptography and most likely a very large number of hands. A method that anyone can use, however, is tracking it manually and looking for patterns. You can do this most easily by making a program that will gather the hand ...


1

This I think could simply be that two or more colluders would not only avoid being in the same pot against a third player but they would communicate which should drop out based on hand quality. This does not make sense as a rule, its not this simple. The players attempting the collusion would want to be together in the same pot against a third player to ...


1

You can measure the improbability of a sequence of events all you want, but you can never 100% be sure that these events are a consequence of tampering with the random number generator. As big as PokerStars is, they have a lot of incentive to run their games straight up. Imagine if it leaked that they are creating these big cooler situations to generate ...


1

Pokerstars (Amaya) is a multi- billion dollar company. They have licenses in different countries to operate in them. They will soon have over 200 billion! hands played on their site. It's all about variance. If you think that they arent honest, dont play there. But there is no chance to prove that they manipulate things. GL at the tables:)


1

This is a major breach of etiquette. If the player wanted to see your cards, they had the option of paying to do so, and they didn't. As a dealer, I would have ideally protected the muck proactively, as this is a game security issue generally, though for bigger reasons than maintaining etiquette. That it happened despite (the lack of) this, the supervisor ...


1

Some poker sites have code built into their clients that allow them to display a captcha challenge when the server requests it (which likely is manually triggered by the security team after reports from other users, or automatically if your playing behavior shows suspicious metrics as detailed by @Grinch91). And some also do track mouse movement to see if it ...


1

Interesting thought, I think it is possible but it would be very difficult to pull off depending on the method used. I believe the WSOP now uses RFID cards instead of hole cams to show the player cards on the live broadcast. Using a nano/micro-implant, one could imagine that a player could get information about other players cards. This is impossible at the ...


1

You need to talk to the shift supervisor away from the table. Sure it is cheating, but no proof enough for anything to happen with a ruling. So the supervisor may or may not do anything about it. But if he has had complaints before, your complaint will help the house in a future action to 86 the players. The dealer is not going to help here, it is not part ...


1

I would not use the word cheat. Not follow the rules is not always cheating. Call the floor if bets are not paid out properly. As for instantly muck after a call that may not be against the rules in a cash game but it is highly irregular. You could call the floor. Personally I would just not play there. Sounds like regulars that gang up on ...


1

Call me cynical, you could get away with it. I am constantly amazed by how comfortable and confident that poker players are by their faith in the security systems they believe the casinos have to protect them. I kind of think that it has something to do with the addictive aspect of the game that puts many players in denial about a lot of things, the ...


1

There would be the ink or dust the act of marking the cards the custom glasses inspecting the cards new decks dealers and staff trained at detecting players detecting surveillance cameras your actions In many states you would be breaking the law. In Vegas it would be a felony. Pretty sure you have not broken poker.


1

Firstly, just don't. People tend not to take too kindly to cheaters, and even more so when the cheaters are taking their personal cash. If and when you'll eventually be caught you'll likely end up in some trouble. Not to mention it's considered stealing and you can get in legal trouble. It depends on many things really, such as: How good you guys are at it ...


1

The biggest concern is that a card from the bottom of the deck may become exposed, which could give some players an unfair advantage. The other concern, as you mentioned, is that card manipulation often requires the card handler to do things like roll the deck. Being a good cheat is real hard work though, so I'm guessing you can be 99.999% sure the dealer ...


1

Why would a dealer not always keep a deck low and level? A dealer who does not keep the deck level is ignorant or lazy about good dealing procedure or cheating you. Rolling the deck is just plain sloppy dealing of the worst kind. What is going on when they roll a deck? Is the dealer cheating or just lazy? More likely then not the dealer is just lazy. ...


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