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9

The dealer changes every hand in games that don't have a dedicated dealer. It is the way poker began. The button represents who should be dealer when there isn't a dedicated dealer. Dedicated dealers are only used for convenience, they are in no way a specified part of the game. I suppose they're used online just to keep things simple, with cards coming ...


6

A poker hand is 5 cards, so the dealer is showing that the winning hand is JJKQ7. If, instead, the winning hand had been AhKh for a flush, the dealer instead would have raised the Qh 4h and 7h.


6

The key is the button represents the dealer, the dealer doesn't deal himself/herself first. So, the first card goes to the big blind player in heads-up. According to heads up poker rules, the dealer posts the small blind and the other player posts the big blind. The first card is dealt to the player in the Big Blind. The dealer acts first pre-flop and ...


6

From my experience as a dealer when closing out a tournament, the player whom ended up winning would give the 'loose change' from their win as a tip. I.E. say you take down a 100$ tournament in your local card room, and the top prize is something like $1,675, I've often seen players give the 75$. Normally second place would follow suit too. In bigger prize ...


6

In this specific case, my opinion is that the dealer didn't do anything wrong. Especially because there was no more action, but also because he was just trying to be helpful to the new player. The rules for dealers are enforced by the floor, and if the player really had a problem with the dealer, calling the floor over would be the best course of action. ...


6

I don't have much experience live, so these answers only apply to online poker, but I believe the answer should apply the same either way. I'm not sure how this works in ring games, I assume that there is no dealing while everyone is sitting out. Tournaments and SNGs are different. Players can't truly sit out, as they can in a ring game. The deal continues,...


5

Although physically the dealer is in place, the symbolic dealer is one of the players. They don't deal the cards but they have a "button" in front of them, indicating they are the dealer (and the blinds are the players to the button's left). After each hand, the (actual) dealer has the responsibility of moving the button to the next player. Often the ...


4

The key factor in this case is that the betting is over and the hands have been tabled. Once you get to showdown "cards speak", and everyone at the table has an obligation to ensure that the correct hand wins. OK so the hand hasn't technically reached showdown yet but the principal still applies.


3

This of course depends on the location. There are of course standard poker rules that are applied pretty much everywhere, but most poker rooms have various rules that apply only to them. Without knowing more details about what happened, we can only speculate/guess. If I were to guess, I'd say that the poker room has some form of "bad beat promotions" going ...


3

As a former dealer, you can tip whatever you want to tip. Let me give you some guidelines for lower stakes games, that myself as a dealer would expect (i.e. $1-$2 up to $2-$5): If the pot is won pre-flop without any major betting, tip $0. If the pot is a small pot, i.e. $25-$50, tip $1. If the pot is on the larger side, i.e. $50-$150, tip $1-$2. If the pot ...


3

There is only really one thing that can happen. Reshuffle, burn and give everyone their 7th card. The only other option, and this is only because it's a home game, would be to have the players who have folded tell the dealer discreetly their cards, remove them to the muck and then just shuffle whats left. Assuming they can all remember their cards. At least ...


3

A1 is the small blind and B2 is the big blind. The F6 seat is the button, even though it's empty, as it would have been the button had the players stayed — it's a dead button. We can't skip having A1 as the small blind — that would just be giving him a discount. G7 and H8 can't come into a game in the middle of the blinds so they'll have to wait to play ...


2

In a casino (or any other poker game with a professional dealer) the dealer will deal every hand, however they are actually dealing for the player, who would normally be dealing if they weren't there. In games like Texas Holdem, the dealer moves clockwise one person every hand so that each person will experience the advantages/disadvantages of their table ...


2

It is custom betting so there is not (yet) a standard. Basically win the pot wins the button. You will need to defer to house / casino rules. If you are to the left by 1 or 2 positions of a big stack dominating the table you could get killed on blinds. A small pot is no longer just a small pot as the button comes with it. It messes with pay a bb ...


2

In the video, the dealer does in fact, deal 5 cards. It has no effect on the game's outcome, but a pro dealer will pitch all the cards in a showdown. The main reason is to not confuse the eye in the sky, or a recreational player. However, this dealer is making multiple mistakes. It's a case of a little knowledge being dangerous. She is clearly experienced, ...


2

I'd say the entire board is dealt in all cases, but I don't see why that earlier stop may cause any problem. There are no standardized inernational rules for poker, so I guess the house gets to choose


1

Yes, in states that allow(ed) player-dealt poker (as did California in years past), there are such rules. California didn't have hold'em back then, but the lowball rules were like this: Dealer shuffles, age cuts, then dealer deals everyone five cards. Dealer then sets down the stub and puts a chip on it. Players declare their draw in turn, after which the ...


1

As a dealer, I would never not be holding the deck from the moment it was cut and picked up, until the stub was being mucked. The biggest concern is what can be done when the deck is picked up and released, repeatedly. The dealer should ideally pick up and hold the deck throughout the hand, but for a home game this may not be feasible, and therefore the deck ...


1

It depends on where you are playing. There are two distinct sets of procedures for moving a button. One is called forward moving button, the other set of procedures does not really have a common title in slang or other wise. The forward moving button is increasingly rare. It has been extinct in Las Vegas poker rooms for at least three decades. It is used ...


1

In principle, yes. The dealer should deal all five cards and that's what will happen in a serious event. But anyway, what's the difference? Who cares?


1

In fact the dealer does have to deal all 5 cards. Consider this: Player A: 10dJd Player B: AcAs Flop: QdKd2s Turn: Ad (Royal Flush Made) River: Ad So, there are 2 Ace of diamonds in the deck and the hand is not valid. If they'd not dealt the river, Player B would have been cheated out of their money.


1

I believe just an ego issue here. Nothing wrong with dealer telling the player, when there is no action left behind.


1

So technically the hand was over nothing the dealer did influenced the play of the hand so no big deal. Does not warrant disrupting the game for a floor decision, if the complaining player wants they should go talk to the floor away from the table. The player who complained he seems to be a piece of work so to speak. Obviously he is not in charge of ...


1

I like @Grinch91's answer for its level of detail and rationale. The tip amounts also pretty much agree with what I've seen and with the amounts I tend to tip myself. On the second half of your question; I've never seen nor heard of dealers fixing a hand so that a bigger tipper would win the pot. First of all, doing so would probably be more trouble than it ...


1

Notice that under the Moving Button rule A1 will post SB and becomes button, while both B2 and C3 will post BB! After that hand B2 becomes button and both B2 and C3 will post SB, G7 posts BB. Next hand brings sanity: C3 - button, G7 - SB, H8 - BB.


1

On the first hand, F6 is SB and A1 is BB. Don't look where button go but look where BB go on new hand (rule of the dead button). Second hand, B2 is BB, A1 is SB. Button is theoricaly at F6 (empty seat) and no player can enter betwwen button and SB, so Button stay in a empty seat and new players (G7 and H8) can't play this hand (no deal and no ante for ...


1

In home games, the player with the Dealer button deals out the cards.


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