Hot answers tagged

6

A poker hand is 5 cards, so the dealer is showing that the winning hand is JJKQ7. If, instead, the winning hand had been AhKh for a flush, the dealer instead would have raised the Qh 4h and 7h.


6

The key is the button represents the dealer, the dealer doesn't deal himself/herself first. So, the first card goes to the big blind player in heads-up. According to heads up poker rules, the dealer posts the small blind and the other player posts the big blind. The first card is dealt to the player in the Big Blind. The dealer acts first pre-flop and ...


6

In a cash game, players can, if they agree to it, have multiple run outs of the board when one or more players are all-in. Basically think of it as two separate hands with the same flop. The idea here is that for the person whom has the higher equity it reduces their chances of outright losing the entire pot, while for the player needing to get lucky it ...


6

This doesn't apply universally, but anywhere that uses the TDA rules would use this: 34: Misdeals A: Misdeals include but are not necessarily limited to: 1) 2 or more boxed cards on the initial deal; 2) first card dealt to the wrong seat; 3) cards dealt to a seat not entitled to a hand; 4) a seat entitled to a hand is dealt out; 5) In stud, if any of the ...


4

In this case absolutely it's a misdeal from every place I've ever worked. But once every player has gotten a card the situations for a misdeal change. I have worked in some places that will call it a misdeal regardless of when a card is exposed during the deal, I.E. button's last card exposed, misdeal. Likewise I have worked in places where after every ...


4

The hand should proceed, and UTG+3's hand should be declared dead. The answers that say this is a misdeal are flat out wrong. So much action has already happened in the hand that it makes absolutely no sense to declare a misdeal unless you're using some very particular (and bad) house rules that everyone has had access to. In particular, in Robert's Rules ...


4

Yes. You must burn a card every street, I.E. before the flop, before the turn and before the river.


3

There is only really one thing that can happen. Reshuffle, burn and give everyone their 7th card. The only other option, and this is only because it's a home game, would be to have the players who have folded tell the dealer discreetly their cards, remove them to the muck and then just shuffle whats left. Assuming they can all remember their cards. At least ...


3

It sounds like you should just stop burning cards in home games since they cause grief without meaningfully affecting the game otherwise.


2

This is a miss deal. You can't just penalize the player who got dealt an extra card and continue play as if all is well. Once it has been declared a miss deal all players muck their cards (a few players usually complain because they have an ace/pair in their hand). Then the hand is re-dealt in the same position as if the miss deal didn't happen


2

You deal the cards normally until each player has 5, then the player in FL gets his other 8 cards. If you are playing Pineapple you give the FL player an extra card, which will be his/her's discard card. Side bit you may also want to know is that a FL hand is technically a continuation of the last hand, which means button does not move while FL occurs.


2

When a player in the blinds leaves the game. And a quote that caught my attention: When there are only two players The normal rules for positioning the blinds do not apply when there are only two players at the table. The player on the button is always due the small blind, and the other player must pay the big blind. The player on the button ...


2

If the card is known, you fix it if no action has taken place. If action has taken place, you continue the round using the card. You might also consider just letting it lay and play always, because you can never be quite sure the dealer actually did not burn. Unless someone happened to see them not burn it is never really clear. Note if you're on the flop ...


2

In the video, the dealer does in fact, deal 5 cards. It has no effect on the game's outcome, but a pro dealer will pitch all the cards in a showdown. The main reason is to not confuse the eye in the sky, or a recreational player. However, this dealer is making multiple mistakes. It's a case of a little knowledge being dangerous. She is clearly experienced, ...


2

I'd say the entire board is dealt in all cases, but I don't see why that earlier stop may cause any problem. There are no standardized inernational rules for poker, so I guess the house gets to choose


2

This is the general gaming rule typical at a casino: If a single card is exposed by the dealer in dealing the hole cards, the dealer must— (a) complete the initial deal; and (b) exchange the exposed card with the card that was to be the first burn card before the flop; and (c) give all players the opportunity to view the exposed card; and (d) use the ...


1

In principle, yes. The dealer should deal all five cards and that's what will happen in a serious event. But anyway, what's the difference? Who cares?


1

In fact the dealer does have to deal all 5 cards. Consider this: Player A: 10dJd Player B: AcAs Flop: QdKd2s Turn: Ad (Royal Flush Made) River: Ad So, there are 2 Ace of diamonds in the deck and the hand is not valid. If they'd not dealt the river, Player B would have been cheated out of their money.


1

If this were to happen in a casino it would be declared a misdeal and they would try to refund the money of everyone that had something invested. this is unlike the situation where someone who had the wrong number of cards and their hand would be declared dead and action would continue


1

Agree burn the turn and river serves no purpose if everyone is all in preflop. If the card is marked that information is of no value as betting is over. But it is still the rule. In a home game you are free to modify the rules. Same thing with running the board multiple times. Burning the card serves no purpose as betting is over but they still do it.


1

Burn cards are burned in live poker to prevent cheating. If somebody spies, loads the deck or otherwise has an idea of the order of the cards then burn cards help mix it up and make cheating more difficult. Mostly, it is a deterrent so that people don't think they can get away with cheating. This also prevents conflicts about loaded decks etc that could ...


1

The biggest concern is that a card from the bottom of the deck may become exposed, which could give some players an unfair advantage. The other concern, as you mentioned, is that card manipulation often requires the card handler to do things like roll the deck. Being a good cheat is real hard work though, so I'm guessing you can be 99.999% sure the dealer ...


1

Why would a dealer not always keep a deck low and level? A dealer who does not keep the deck level is ignorant or lazy about good dealing procedure or cheating you. Rolling the deck is just plain sloppy dealing of the worst kind. What is going on when they roll a deck? Is the dealer cheating or just lazy? More likely then not the dealer is just lazy. ...


1

Create a token that you can use as a "dealer button." Something that indicates the dealer position, and let someone else deal for him (player who just dealt, for example). Poker is a game for everyone. Make it so he can play.


1

The considerations are these: (1) Everyone must have equal information. The fairness of the game is paramount. (2) Once betting action has taken place, cards stand as dealt. (3) If at all possible, the cards dealt should be the same ones initially destined from the shuffle. Standard casino procedure is this: if the burn card is shown, and this is ...


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