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14

A redraw generally tends to mean that you have the best hand, and you have a draw to another better hand. In Texas Hold 'Em, the best example would be a set on the flop. If you get all-in against a flush draw, even though they have a draw to a better hand (a flush), you have a re-draw to a hand that can beat their draw (a full house). The term is more ...


8

For an open-ended straight draw, there are exactly 8 cards that will give you your straight: 4 of each suit at the low end, and 4 of each suit at the high end. However, to make a flush, you have 9 cards available that will make your flush, as there are 13 cards to a suit, and you have 4 of them in your hand. At 3 cards to the set (again assuming an outside ...


6

No. The player with KQ would win the whole pot. The winner of the pot is the player who can make the best 5-card hand from the 7 possible cards -- 5 board cards plus their two hole cards. Player 1 has KQ, so his 7 cards are KKKQ642. Ignoring suits, the best possible hand here is KKKQ6, or trip kings with a queen kicker. Player 2 has K9, so his 7 cards ...


5

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


4

Villain's range is weighted toward Qx given his lack of interest in maximizing fold equity, so you're something like 32% to win and being given 2730:1170 = 30%, slightly correct pot odds to call chip-equity wise. If you fold, your money equity via ICM is $411. If you commit, 32% of the time your stack will be 7,130 against 2,870, for a money equity of $585,...


3

Usually runner-runner probability is so low that it won't affect the consideration of pot odds. Thus, in most cases, realistically, you calculate the direct odds. The only exception would be runner-runner flushes OR runner-runner straights (flop-->river), where the possibility is slightly less than 4% for each one, i.e. you can consider it as an extra out, ...


3

So in this case let's first count our outs. We have 8 cards that can make us our open ended straight draw, we also have another 7 cards that will make us our flush. So a total of 15. We know of our two cards plus the 3 flop cards, so we know there are 47 cards left in the deck. So how do we work out the odds here? So we have 15 cards that make us win left ...


3

You have 3 pots $40 - player1, player2, player3, player4 $120 - player2, player3, player4 $100 - player3, player4 Hand order 1 - Player1 Player2 tie 9933A 2 - Player3 Player4 tie 3322A Player1 and Player 2 split the $40 pot Player2 wins the $120 pot Player3 and Player4 spit the $100 pot


3

You're looking at it from the skewed perspective where you already have four cards toward your goal. When you look at it from the point of view where you have five random cards, it's less likely that they will form a flush than a straight. So, it's more difficult to even get the four-flush than the open-ended straight draw. The odds for getting a flush ...


3

On a strict mathematical basis, no, this is not a good play. You are getting 1-1 odds on your money when you need more like 2-1 just to break even. However, you can introduce fold equity into this line of thinking. Fold equity in a nutshell: if you can get opponents to fold, then your hand/odds/draw don't matter nearly as much. So the part that I would ...


3

It depends on your impressions of your opponent, if he's tight he wouldn't ever call your bets on the flop and turn with only a draw. In that case bet because he has something and he's willing to call with what he has and you have him beat. If he's a loose player then he could have the flush. If you check he'll bet on the river 9 times out of ten. You have ...


2

Say you have two pair on the flop and your opponent has a flush draw. On the turn they hit their flush and you don't improve; you have a redraw to a full house.


2

Overall it is about twice as hard to make a flush compared to a straight. probability Yes the last mile might be easier for a flush but the first 4 miles are harder. A flush draw has 9 outs (13-4). An open ended straight draw has 8 outs. Any flush draw is open ended. You just need one of the 4 remaining of the suit. Actually on open ended straight ...


2

You are calculating pot odds a very unusual way. Your formula is mostly correct (but only works some of the time), and I'll get back to that in a moment, but typically you would just use two variables: costToCall and sizeOfPot. Pot odds don't depend on the number of players to have called the bet. One player putting 400 in is the same as four players each ...


2

I think it is marginal to play that from the BB 8-9 suited would be been (maybe) OK Preflop you were getting 3.5 : 2 A flush has the chance of stacking an aggressive player You would be playing it for the implied odds But since you only started the hand with like $65 you don't even have that great of implied odds You were getting pot odds to call the $6 ...


2

No, the value of raising (or betting a draw) is in winning the pot with the bet, IE a semi bluff or keeping the price of the draw down when you have aggressive players behind you whom will almost always bet late when it is checked to them. You would need a lot of players in to get any value from a bet, and you can never be sure any bet is going to get called ...


1

This is a split pot, as both players have a straight (TJQKA) as their best hand - there are no kickers involved. As mentioned in the comments, there is an existing question here which deals with how to evaluate hands against each other to determine the outcome of a hand and explains how the pot should be awarded.


1

It would certainly never be a value bet unless you think you are ahead. Mathematically on a draw you want to see cards as cheap as possible every time. It is not the same as call math. On call you only have to call or fold. Here you have option to check. To expect multiple callers after checked to you is silly. If there is a flush draw on the ...


1

From a strictly pot odds perspective, this would be similar to calling with a draw in that you want there to be enough money going into the pot such that the money you're putting in is at a good "price". For example, if you have a draw that is 33% to hit, you'd want a minimum of 2 callers to be OK with the bet (you're putting in 1/3 of the chips). In ...


1

I realize its the bubble and I think opening the BTN really wide here is fine, but I'm pretty sure this is a fold preflop. As for the flop it's really close but a fold since he might even do this with 5x or mid pairs if he decides not to shove them preflop.


1

People are puzzled by this because it is easier to make a straight starting to with two straight cards (8% of the time) than a flush starting with two flush cards (6% of the time). But GIVEN four of a flush on the flop and four to a straight (open-ended on both sides) it is easier to make the flush (35% of the time from the flop) than the straight (32% of ...


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