21

Casinos in the US generally have the "cards speak" rule. That is, when a hand is properly tabled--exposed to everyone at showdown--it is the responsibility of all players, the dealer, floormen, and anyone else present to see that the pot is awarded to the best hand shown, regardless of what the players might say. Some players object to this rule: they ...


7

No, there is no common gesture. There is, however, the "one chip rule": If you are facing a bet, and throw into the pot a single chip worth more than the amount to call, you have called. For example, if the bet facing you is $10, and you throw in a $100 chip, that's a call, and the dealer will make change for you. If you want to raise, you are required to ...


7

TL;DR: Please just say the word "call." I suspect different house rules might apply here, but in my experience, these are general rules. YMMV. Also, I'm basing this answer on the TDA rules, which is a common but not universal set of rules. It's acceptable to just put in a single chip to represent a call. If that chip represents more than the bet ...


6

It depends whether the hand was in progress or not. I think you are free to tell tells if you like, you will lose out though and will annoy people hoping to exploit this tell. If this happened in the middle of a hand, however, it's different. In general it is considered bad etiquette and may even be against the rules to talk about the hand in progress. The "...


6

In casinos I’ve played in, it’s always “cards speak”. So if you have a straight flush but verbally indicate a straight, the dealer will acknowledge the straight flush.


6

From my experience as a dealer when closing out a tournament, the player whom ended up winning would give the 'loose change' from their win as a tip. I.E. say you take down a 100$ tournament in your local card room, and the top prize is something like $1,675, I've often seen players give the 75$. Normally second place would follow suit too. In bigger prize ...


5

The reason it is penalized is to stop collusion and giving an unfair advantage to other players. Let me just give you two examples to the above reasons. Player A and player B are working together to try win, this could entail anything from soft playing each other to just straight dumping of chips. So lets just say in a hand we get to the river, maybe 3 ...


5

In the several casinos I've played in the cards speak for themselves, but you have to be careful to show down or you can get burned. In particular, I saw the following hand at Mohegan Sun where the apparent best hand lost: Two players are all-in. The called player (who should have showed down) instead asks the caller what he has. The caller announced he ...


5

So I'll preface this answer with that as a former dealer I've always applied the rules and I've never really cared too much for what the players believe is the rules, or what is good etiquette around when cards get mucked. Let me first just post the WSOP rule from 2019, which while not universal across all tournament spaces it's often referenced and or ...


4

Once you get into action then never. Pre flop with just some small raises maybe. Once you see a flop then mum. It could be construed as code words for discussing the hand. It distracts a player in the hand. It slows down play. On a big hand you should not even be chit chatting with other players not in the hand.


4

No, it's not bad etiquette to want to try win a pot. You'd be surprised how many players don't realise an obvious split-pot.


4

Your scenario sounds like a dealer that is either really new, not trained well or a blackjack/pai gow dealer switching over to poker. What surprises me is that the other players at the table where not immediately correcting the dealer while this was happening. Dealers make mistakes all the time. Stuff happens. Hands get mucked by accident, etc - I've seen ...


4

Generally speaking there is limited scope to what happens. Generally, the house is not responsible for damage done by cheaters, and they really don't have a right to say confiscate chips or cash to redistribute them to other players. A private game on the other hand has about any remedy they choose, and have chosen various remedies up to, and including ...


4

Yes it's rude, or rather many players will consider it rude. However you're playing I assuming to make money and not friends, so if you want to cash out and buy-in again that's your business. However many card rooms will have policies that forbid this, as effectively you're taking cash off the table, which they tend to not like. The wording of these type of ...


4

Yes, that would probably come as disrespectful. Not to mention that if you want to be successful in your games, you should be paying attention to what's going on at the table.


3

From Robert's Rules of Poker: "Deliberately acting out of turn will not be tolerated. A player who checks out of turn may not bet or raise on the next turn to act. A player who has called out of turn may not change his wager to a raise on the next turn to act. An action or verbal declaration out of turn is binding unless the action to that player is ...


3

It's important to realize that running it more than once does not change the odds at all. It will only reduce the variance for you and your opponent. If you want to reduce your variance as much as possible, you could run it as many times as the stub (remaining cards in the deck) would permit. Even more efficient would be to just chop the pot based on your ...


3

This is a very good question. In a very technical sense a hand is not "folded" until it is released over the line. They key word being released. As long as a player is holding their cards or has them protected with chips on top of them it is not a dead or folded hand. That's not to say you might not get a ruling otherwise, you might depending on where you ...


3

So as a dealer, I've had this situation occur many many many times. To put it bluntly if it's angle shoot, as you said to try get a reaction out of a player, I'm informing the player not to do so and calling floor to get a round penalty once the hand is over. No questions asked. Now I'm certain most dealers, and myself included, would give any player a ...


3

I have seen people do this before, in my case they would usually draw/sketch on their phone or an ipad when they are out of a hand. I do not find it to be bad etiquette as long as they are paying attention to the action and not causing delays. @David makes a great point by mentioning you should pay attention to what's going on at the table if you want to be ...


2

I've had a fair bit of experience with nootropics - I'm narcoleptic, and a lot of what people use as nootropics are on-label prescriptions for me. I'd say that if you feel like you can focus on the game, pay attention to the players around you, and do the basic statistics math (pot odds / outs / etc), then you're not at a disadvantage. Without exlporing the ...


2

Nothing, besides perhaps criminal investigation. Poker is not a sport with a sanctioning body like the NBA, NFL etc, that has sanctioning powers in this respect. Casino promoters, (Use this term as a catch all for the operators and organizers) have regular powers to disqualify players, but unless there was some kind of incident, like a fist fight at the ...


2

I own a poker tour in Colorado that specializes in "bar poker". I feel your pain in the sense of not wanting people who aren't spending money to win anything, but the way the law is interpreted in my state it's just a change you are going to have to take. As an owner, I don't want non-paying customers to win any more than the venue (bar) does. Generally if ...


2

Not Sure if it breaks laws, but you could give paying customers an advantage by adding to their chip stacks if they buy products. As long as it's obvious to everyone of course. However, that may mean it's not neccesarily a "Freeroll" anymore. Ethically speaking, "weeding" out non buying customers from winning may amount to cheating on the poker providers ...


2

Definitely not bad form in my opinion and I've never seen anyone berated for doing so in the way you described. I also usually do this, for the reasons you have given, and will continue to do so.


2

If you and your opponent are heads up, you can say something like "I'm not folding", which basically communicates the same thing (if you raise, I'm going to call), and avoids the rule stated above in Dr.Drfbaglll's post (you haven't stated any action, you are just stating what you won't do). If there are more players in the hand, you should not say anything ...


2

If you're out of the hand it is definitely considered bad form to discuss the hand being played. If it's not poker related, like in this situation, it's not out of line. Unless, the opposing player has a doctorate in psychology (and likely even if he does,) I find it very hard to believe that spearmint vs peppermint would give him too many clues.


2

When the nuts is actually on board, like T♠J♥Q⋄K♣A♠, I would say it's probably bad etiquette to continue raising in a cash game where the rake will be affected accordingly (although I have in the past seen people fold on the river in situations like this, albeit infrequently, but it happened!). In a tournament (where rake ...


2

I agree with @Danny in that the cards should always be burned. This should apply even in the case of all-in preflop, for 2 reasons: while pre-flop, you can see the top card of the deck, so you might make a decision to do the all-in move you mentioned based on that information it's a dangerous precedent to introduce exceptions to the rule (or any rule) ...


2

It is proper to burn cards if there is no further action? Yes, absolutely. There is no case where it is not considered proper to burn cards if there is no further action. Some Context: Cards are burned to prevent live cheating. There is no scenario where this should not be done. Reason: Players can see the top card of a deck. If the next card has any ...


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