14

This will be pretty messy if I don't define some variables, so here goes: P$ = Current size of the pot S$ = Minimum of your stack vs your opponent's stack F% = Chance of your opponent folding to your shove (this should be between 0 and 1; divide percentages by 100 to get corresponding value) W% = Chance of you winning when called (this should be between 0 ...


7

Q7x or "The Computer Hand" is the median poker hand in Texas holdem. If you really want to analyse these things in more depth, I'd suggest getting Pokerstove. You can run all hand matchups with numerous competing opponents through the free software.


6

The responsibility to show first lies on the person who put in the last bet or raise on the last betting round. In your example, this will be the person who shoved all-in. If the second player sees those cards and his hand is not a winner, he can safely muck and the pot will be awarded to the shover. If the second player has the best hand and wants to win ...


6

As you can imagine, your equity in a heads up hand with no rake, where you bet preflop and deal out all community cards without betting, will be 50%. Other variations of this, such as the dealer winning ties or the introduction of a rake, will lower your equity (and since this is a casino game, I'm willing to bet that they have something in their favor). ...


6

*Range charts made with https://premiumpokertools.com/equity-calculator Here's my analysis! Assuming your opponent is min-raising about 80ish percent of hands preflop, a reasonable calling range against your small 3-bet size might be this: After the flop, removal effects make villain's range look like this: When you shove 3.5 times the flop, the villain's ...


5

The more players, the more money on the table. The rake is less noticed. Be aware that: The rake is increased together with the number of the hands. If you play HU and on the first hand you both go all-in, the rake will be minimum. If you play many hands, the total rake is increased (and of course, the amount of money is decreased). If you play in a full ...


5

TL; DR - I shove the turn. Personally i would have taken a more aggressive line than check calling the flop, but Hero's flop line is reasonable. On the turn it gets abit dicey, H has a strong hand on a board that easily runs bad. If H calls the turn, would H call a jam if the river was a J? A heart? If V had a strong hand like two pair, would he value bet ...


4

I think you played this hand ok, the only thing I see a problem with is your bet on the flop. This flop is a terrible one for TT, not only are there connected overcards here, but there is also a diamond draw. If you bet this flop, hands like JT, AJ, AT, Kx, Qx, and any 2 diamonds will always call. Most of the time if you get called you will be in bad shape ...


3

TT, JJ, and QQ are all hard hands to play as you don't want to release them when you don't flop a set. You had a flop with 2 over cards out of position. You have a blockers on the straight so I would not be worried about that. I get taking one shot at the flop but after that give up. Or rep a Q and fire three times. If you are going to bet the turn here ...


3

Completely depends on your opponent. You can start out min-raising 90-100% but if he 3-bet shoves a ton then you can't do this. Or you can try limping and min-betting lots of flops, but he if shoves PF from the BB a ton, you can't do it (there is a hint as to how you should play against people who take those strategies themselves!). Against really good ...


3

I don't think anything is proven, not even that ev_sb >= 0, so the only bounds we have are trivial: -0.5 <= ev_sb <= 1. An easier question is "What ev_sb do people find solving abstracted versions of HUNLHE". It would be be interesting to know the sorts of values people are getting, i.e. 1) The value of the (abstract) game from the SB's point-of-...


3

Preflop is ok. Flop: I would prefer a much smaller flop bet ($0.55-$0.80) because a) TT has some showdown and im not looking to inflate the pot and b) OOP there are many bad turn/rivers, and not many good ones. A smaller bet can get ATo-AJo, maybe 88+ to call, which gives us some value. A flush draw, any K or Q is not folding to a 2/3 pot flop bet. I can ...


2

I play my hand. I look at what is on the board and figure out the hands that could beat me. Then I try and figure out if my opponents bets could make sense with those hands. If so I give him credit. Then I decide if it is worth the risk with the hand I have that my opponent may have played his hand like a genius(Phil would pronouce that idiot). If so ...


2

What type of player do you think he is? Is he smart enough to show you one play, perhaps to put you on tilt or set you up for a future move, and then make that move? In the end, it's one piece of information that you use to make your decision. I'd still go through the usual hand/position analysis, and make my decision that way.


2

Well, think about it: if you're heads'up, then the rake is basically from both player's stack since in most heads'up matches, almost all hands are played (super wide range). If you are in a full ring game (9 players), then maybe you play AT MOST 25 % of the hands. In this case, only in that small percetange of hands rake is taken from your stack / pot. So ...


2

KQ offsuit apparently has about 48 - 50 % equity against that range (I calculated this using an equity calculator). So, given that the all-in was preflop, you essentially have a coin-flip. So it's very hard to determine if a call here would be +EV or -EV, especially because figuring out that range is always very hard. So the calculation of equity can (and ...


2

Why are you only worried about quads? What beats you? 4 99 KK AA What hand might call that you beat? JJ - 33 (except 99) 2x 9x Hero should not have called pre flop with 2x Pre flop call with 4x is wrong. And he does not have 44 with 3 on the board. Pre flop villain should have raised AA, KK In heads up you would likely get a raise from 99 ...


2

It wasn't the worst move you could of made, that would of been check raising all in. You where right taking over the lead in the hand, I am assuming he was first in so the buttons range here is ATC, any two cards. I think your raise was slightly small, should of been at least three time his twenty and maybe slightly more. I really want someone motivated to ...


2

I think you brilliantly misplayed the hand. Here are my arguments: You say that: I admit I am no pro poker player. And I think your opponent isn't either, because you both are playing short stacked. Actually, it's a live, friendly cash game. You have 40 BB and he has 60. Why aren't you buying in for 100 BB, so you can win your opponent's stack? There ...


2

We have 52% equity against his range. Let's do a brief and rough ev calculation of all scenarios: Supposing bet size at 200$ in the 300$ pot. Donking 12% of the time we will be raised by a strong hand and have to fold: -200$ 40% of the time we will be called. Our raw equity is then around 45% of a 700$ pot. It will be hard to realize our equity as we are ...


1

Poker is not yet a solved game. An optimal strategy has not yet been found. Trying to implement your or someone else's knowledge into a computer program will only result in a sub optimal version of you/them. If you want to create a bot that can for example beat every human over a long enough sample, you want to take a different approach. Now regarding the ...


1

In poker, there are never identical situations, because even if you play with the same cards and the same opponent for days, you will end up creating history and dynamics between you. However, you will end up facing decisions similar to what you have faced in the past. And yes, in the long run if you want to be balanced and unpredictable you will end up ...


1

Bet/Fold > bet/call > check/call Checking the river you miss so much value because your opponent will never bet worse hands that its a blunder. bet/call you bet for value and call because he has some value hands in his raising range. mainly smaller flushes, remember we were trying to rep a straight on the turn. bet/fold mainly because most people, ...


1

The solution is actually known. I can solve it in 2-3 days using a server I rent for that exact purpose (studying poker) and some specialized software. To the answer from Ying Li: You misunderstand Nash Equilibrium in poker. If you played a perfect GTO strategy, you essentially would be unbeatable. There is no way your strategy would be beat by drunk ...


1

I am probably one of the few people with significant experience in all three fields (mathematics, Machine Learning (and AI), poker). To answer is it known, the answer is probably not yet. There are two approaches to beating an imperfect information game with AI. The first has really nothing to do with Nash Equilibrium. The first is basically in a way, a ...


1

When playing heads up I find you almost have to open with anything, if you are normally a conservative player, heads up can be hard, especially if short stacked. Try and adopt a really aggressive strategy, as if you continue to play conservatively and your opponent is marginally more aggressive, they will eventually win due to the swallowing of the blinds/...


1

Anyone who sits out just to skip the blinds doesn't understand what's really happening. If you sit out and miss both blinds, once the button gets to you, you'll have to pay both blinds before you're even dealt cards. Same if you skip the SB. You are absolutely not getting a free ride through. Sometimes it may seem like you get by without paying, but it will ...


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