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13

Your question is slightly all over the place but I'll try to answer it the best I can. First, it seems like you've fallen prey to a common mindset issue many, mostly recreational, poker players have. You shouldn't be measuring your results by what you're currently up or down during one session. You'd be surprised to learn that winning players are really ...


9

On the contrary of the answer above, the answer is yes, is the right move. Calling 36000 to win 87000 means that you have must have at least 29% if equity. The hands that has this equity against AK are 22+, A2s+, KTs+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s AKo, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 92o+, 82o+, 72o+, 62o+, 52o+, 42o+ even taking in to ...


9

how would you play this hand knowing that the villain is an incredible calling station who will put his entire stack even on the 2nd pair? You did put all your stack when you were way ahead and he called: that is perfect! I'm not saying that's how you should always play KK like that: but versus an opponent which you know cannot fold, the goal is to go ...


7

You did not play the pot correctly, you managed to lose the maximum amount possible. Your pre-flop raise was OK. With queens I would much rather have two aces hit the board then one, but that only means my hand is a little less likely to be beat at this point because there is one less ace in someone's hand. It does not mean anything other then that, you ...


7

The top 6-max cash game guys playing zoom500 will happily get 100BB in pre-flop with AKo. However the playerpool is really tough and aggresive, so maybe against some tighter live players it is not optimal. Let's discuss how you should play AKo in this spot. You are 200BB deep. This is probably too deep to get AKo in pre-flop. However, he raises to 8.3x the ...


7

*Range charts made with https://premiumpokertools.com/equity-calculator Here's my analysis! Assuming your opponent is min-raising about 80ish percent of hands preflop, a reasonable calling range against your small 3-bet size might be this: After the flop, removal effects make villain's range look like this: When you shove 3.5 times the flop, the villain's ...


6

The best way to beat this kind of player is tight-aggressive. you're not going to outplay this one, you're not going to bluff them, and you're certainly not going to be able to control them. All you can do is beat them. But it requires very disciplined uncreative play. You let them self destruct right into your stack. This kind of player is going to raise ...


6

In my opinion, the most important decision you made during this hand was to call the $85 raise preflop. $85 is a huge 3-bet and will commit you to this pot if you call it. calling the $85 3-bet with this hand would set you up for a shove on any flop where JJ is an overpair, and it would still be hard to fold if JJ was not an overpair. After reviewing ...


5

Should Hero have called villain's pre-flop raise, re-raised, or folded? The only thing you can do is call. You've labelled Villian as tight-aggressive and he's made a small reraise after you've opened under the gun. This is a fairly strong sign of strength. Let's look at your options: Jamming: KQs is doing badly against the average TAG players range in ...


5

It all depends on pot odds. If you have better than 50% pot odds and have 50% equity versus your opponent's range, and you have the bankroll to handle the variance, then you should be looking to play for stacks. This will always produce a long term winning strategy, because you're getting >50% return on a 50% bet. Do you see why? The only situation where ...


5

The only way to lose with a King high straight flush is to a royal flush of the same suit. That means that the KQJT must all be community cards. The last community card is either the 9 or you have it as a pocket card. Case 1: 9 is on the board. The odds of this are the same as getting dealt a royal flush in 5 card stud: 20/52 * 4/51 * 3/50 * 2/49 * 1/48 = ...


5

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


5

You've played the hand fairly weak up to this point: betting $30 into a $200 pot and checking the Ace on the turn. He can't give you much credit for an Ace at the moment - maybe he thinks you have a flush draw or a PP? He is likely to continue bluffing if you just call. Generally how you proceed depends on your table image - if you aren't likely to be ...


5

I agree with vtzl that this was the wrong hand to defend with, not only because of the bad math of the hand, but it also really messed with your table image with this guy if you had to show this hand down. Once this kind of player sees you show down a hand like that he is coming for you. He will be at your blind and he is upping his aggression every time you ...


5

Unless you think your opponent only ever does this move with AA, you're likely to be at least a 70-80% favourite to win the hand. Maybe not the bet to be making with your entire net worth, but with a portion of your poker bank on the table, I'd call this every time. Of course you're not going to win 100% of the time (and it hurts when you do lose - ...


5

Yes, you might be 80% against a random hand, but unless he really is just gambling on his last hand (how can you know?) his likely range will significantly lower your odds. For example: You're getting pot odds of 42%. Your card odds are around 18% if he's only ever shoving AA in this spot, around 23% if he's shoving AA or KK, and 50% if he's shoving AA, KK ...


5

Ok. Let's take this one step at a time. You describe your opponent as a "maniac". However, that player displays no "maniac" behavior in this hand, so I'm not sure where to go with that. I'd like more information on how you get that read on the player. But we can still analyze the hand. So you wake up with A4os in middle position and decide to raise 6x ...


5

No matter the subsequent actions of player 1, as soon as player 2 folds, player 1 should be awarded the side pot, even if his cards are never seen by anyone. Player 3 should never, ever be awarded the side pot, since he didn't have enough money in the pot to earn that from the other players. He was all in for less than the others had, so he should never be ...


5

My initial reaction when reading this hand was that a push was the easy play. After thinking about it a little, I'm not sure that it's so clear. Make no mistake, a push is absolutely a good, profitable play, but maybe just calling is better for the following reason: given his range, (which btw, I think is too tight--you shouldn't ever totally discount ...


5

I would definitely bet the turn, maybe 2/3 of this small pot. With a max straight you are ahead of the range of your opponent. You want to put money in the pot to let Villain draw for a flush (if he holds two ♥) or to a full (if he has a 4), or to a lower straight, all with negative EV. The only dangerous hands at the moment are quads or a made ...


5

At 1/2 1/3 cash games, it's fish central, a lot of good (average shark) players will min-raise nuts (or close to nuts) thinking you can never get out of it. Sharks know one thing, fish can't fold. Going all-in with QQ after being the preflop aggressor is a "give up" move; you basically give your fate to the other guy. Your range is so well identified, if ...


5

So first part of this, we need to in my opinion, breakdown and acknowledge the differences between a straddle game and a larger stake game. In the example you mentioned both may have the same amount of chips in preflop and preaction, but both are extremely different games. First and foremost, typically the average person will sit at a cash game with ...


5

So I'll preface this answer with that as a former dealer I've always applied the rules and I've never really cared too much for what the players believe is the rules, or what is good etiquette around when cards get mucked. Let me first just post the WSOP rule from 2019, which while not universal across all tournament spaces it's often referenced and or ...


4

The hand should proceed, and UTG+3's hand should be declared dead. The answers that say this is a misdeal are flat out wrong. So much action has already happened in the hand that it makes absolutely no sense to declare a misdeal unless you're using some very particular (and bad) house rules that everyone has had access to. In particular, in Robert's Rules ...


4

Critical points to consider: You are on bubble and you are second biggest stack. Player with a lower stack just went all-in having 5 players in front of him In double or nothing all winners get same reward ammount What this should tell you: You should avoid any play which risks loosing a whole stack Opponent has something really strong There is no need ...


4

Regarding the issue with the ante: yes, the dealer will give you back a chip of 500. (S)he will take it either from the current pot or ask another player to make the exchange. But only put the 1000 chip in if you don't have anything smaller to pay for the ante. As long as you have the required chip denominations, use them. As for exchanging chips: yes, it'...


4

I think the player at your table was misinterpreting the rule. This is a raise. Rule 43 states: a multiple-chip bet is a call if there is not one chip that can be removed and still leave at least the call amount. To me, this says that in order for it to be considered a call, there cannot exist a situation where one chip is removed and the resulting ...


4

This looks like a flush. Let's take a look at the action: Preflop We raise 4BB and he calls. Nothing out of the ordinary. Because his VPIP is so low, we can probably put him off of random suited connectors (even the 9dTd elephant in the room!). ATo+, KTs+, QJs, 66+ is a comfortable range I can put him on. Flop He opts for a 1/2 pot bet. Because he is a ...


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