22

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old ...


10

This shouldn't even be a debate/question. It's a standard jam. There's nothing else to do here. Your hand is too strong, there are too many missed draws, and so on. You're truly, 100% overthinking this. You have a monster. Get it in. If Villian has a set or weird two-pair, rebuy and move on to the next hand. I've seen too many posts like this. I might be ...


9

Focus on playing hands that have polarized showdown value. High flush draws and pocket pairs (preflop) are good examples. Basically, against passive callers, the difficulty is that you don't gain information about what they have during the hand, so you have to play only hands where you can be sure you're either leading or losing with high certainty, and then ...


8

Yes, as I understand. Player 2 can either call the amount of the big blind or if they make a raise, they will have to raise to the smallest allowable amount. In this case that would be the twice the size of the big blind (4000).


8

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...


8

It depends! What are your definitions of "conservatively" and "good hand" and "couple of chips"? And how long had you been playing at this game, allowing your opponents to develop an impression of your play? First, you can't make any generalizations based on this single hand. The fact that you got dealt AA doesn't entitle you to win a big pot. It could ...


6

The point of hold-em is that your hand is the best possible five-card combination from all seven cards. So, in this case, yes, it is a split pot. All players (as you describe them) have a 6-high straight. That's the best possible hand, so that's their hand.


6

As I am not allowed to comment below 50 reputation I have to post an answer. I mostly agree with the points of Yang. I would consider playing a Tight Agrgressive (TAG) style of Play as the best optpion here. The general guideline of poker is to maximize your wins and minimize your losses. Meaning to extract the most possible value if you're ahead with smth. ...


5

Although physically the dealer is in place, the symbolic dealer is one of the players. They don't deal the cards but they have a "button" in front of them, indicating they are the dealer (and the blinds are the players to the button's left). After each hand, the (actual) dealer has the responsibility of moving the button to the next player. Often the ...


5

@Dutch.Boyd's answer contradicts the very TDA he posted with it. B: In no-limit and pot limit, an all-in wager of less than a full raise does not reopen the betting to a player who has already acted. Therefor, in a NL game, if you bet 500 and the action comes back to you, you may only re-raise if another player has made a full raise behind you. A full ...


5

Note 1 in the article on Hold'em Odds elaborates on this a bit further: [Note 1] By removing reflection and applying aggressive search tree pruning, it is possible to reduce the number of unique head-to-head hand combinations from 207,025 to 47,008. Reflection eliminates redundant calculations by observing that given hands h_1 and h_2, if w_1 is the ...


5

A preliminary remark. This situation (full over straight) is very common in PLO. Thus playing PLO might be a good way to get used to it. At low limits, players tend to play according to their cards, with some wild decisions from time to time. Preflop. The button could have tried to steal the blinds, but checking in the BB with Q9 seems to be reasonable. ...


5

I would agree with some of the previous answers on this one, although it is easy to be influenced by seeing the outcome. Preflop: no problem with your check here, but let's start to think ranges right away. Villian is just calling in position. His range is wide but eliminates strong premium hands. Button is going to raise frequently with A10-AK and ...


5

Ok. Let's take this one step at a time. You describe your opponent as a "maniac". However, that player displays no "maniac" behavior in this hand, so I'm not sure where to go with that. I'd like more information on how you get that read on the player. But we can still analyze the hand. So you wake up with A4os in middle position and decide to raise 6x ...


5

My initial reaction when reading this hand was that a push was the easy play. After thinking about it a little, I'm not sure that it's so clear. Make no mistake, a push is absolutely a good, profitable play, but maybe just calling is better for the following reason: given his range, (which btw, I think is too tight--you shouldn't ever totally discount ...


5

Here is another way to look at it: Gained if you call and win: 30+50 = 80 Lost if you call and lose: 50 Your Equity = 0.36 EV = Equity(Gained when win) + (1-Equity)(Lost when lose) EV = 0.36(80) + (1-.36)(50) EV = 28.8 + -32 EV = -3.2 Plug in 0.38 for your equity and you will see that its indeed near a break-even call. How did they get that formula? Lets ...


4

I have to go against the flow on this one. I dont think you played it fine. I have not palyed the specific tournament and am not aware of the table dynamics at the given point but raising 2.5bb vs 2 limpers is not really ok in my opinion. Against 2 limpers you need to raise more (at least 3.5-4bb I think) in order to have fold equity. Since JQs is not an ...


4

Well, IMHO, your analysis is pretty good. However, you see this kind of play all the time even in big tournaments. And in general, this play from the A8 is usually not a bad one. Whenever you have a super-short stack (really anything under 10 BBs) then they are capable of pushing with just about anything. In fact, there comes a time that it just doesn't ...


4

One of my favorite poker sayings is, "I guess the rabbit had the gun that time . . ." I think your play was just fine. You made the V take bad odds to get to the flush. So I wouldn't have changed a thing about your play. He laid you bad odds for what is, effectively 1.5 outs after the flop. Maybe your flop pot could have been bigger, but your bet was fine ...


4

I Made a ruling on this exact situation. The pot was small (1/2 NL, $5), there was an ace high straight on board, the ruling was that the pot was split. The ruling was technically incorrect. I made the ruling I did because the pot was small, and it was not a big deal to rule this way in the best interest of the game. However I also announced to the table, ...


4

The minimum bet size is one big blind. This bet is therefore legal. The minimum raise size is the amount you have to call, on top of the call. These rules apply always.


4

When opening a round of betting after the flop, this is called a bet. In Robert's Rules of Poker, "bet" is defined as "The act of making a wager before anyone else on a betting round". Additionally, a "raise" is defined as "To increase the amount of a previous wager". The important thing to note is that when you make the initial bet, your entire wager is ...


4

Betting starts over each round with a min bet and min raise of 1 bb.


4

Turns out the game was shortdeck, which is played with a 36-card deck, meaning: all of the 2s through 5s removed. So if you ever see weird straights in a tournament stream, it's shortdeck (commonly abbreviated by SD)


3

This is a difficult one, they all clearly have a hand of some description. To be making these kind of bets they have to have some sort of pocket pair like AA, KK(not that likely since you have it, but still possible), QQ, JJ etc. They could also have hands like AKs-A10s and are just trying to spike an Ace. There are no danger cards on the board that scare ...


3

Sometimes you realy can't avoid it It realy depends what type of game you are playing if it's super turbo or turbo where you are < 10 BB i guess shoving PF is the right play. If you have no information about your player and you have 20BB in a fast pace game i don't think you can avoid an all in either because of the 5-7BB PF raise. Tournament play and ...


3

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. • If a player goes all-in for less than the minimum legal raise after the open raiser, and is called by at least another player, the open raiser will only be ...


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